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Global Museum Management Software Market 2021

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Museum Management Software Market

Museum Management Software Market Overview 2021:

Latest research report titled ‘Museum Management Software Market’ added by Straits Research provides the reader with a comprehensive overview of the Museum Management Software Market industry and acquainted with the latest market trends, industry and market share information. The content of the report includes industry drivers, latest technological advancements, geographic trends, global market statistics, market forecast, raw material producers and suppliers.

The report offers a combination of qualitative and quantifiable information focusing on aspects such as key market developments, industry and competitor challenges in gap analysis, and new opportunities in the Management Software Market. Museum.

Digitization has made it easy to display antiques and increase overall sales. increased investment and government initiatives for museum development stimulates the market.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sports announces an investment of around US $ 62.03 million per year over the next five years for the maintenance and development of museums in the UK.

Impact of COVID-19 on the Museum Management Software Market:

Last but not least, we are all aware of the ongoing covid-19 pandemic and it continues to impact the development of many markets around the world. However, the direct effect of the pandemic differs depending on market demand. While some markets may see lower demand, several others will remain unscathed and present potential expansion opportunities.

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This free sample report contains:
• A detailed introduction to the in-depth research report.
• Graphic summary of the regional overview and analysis.
• Best manufacturer in the market with its sales and revenue analysis.
• Special illustrations of market information, constraints, drivers and trends.
• Examples of report pages.

Detailed segmentation of the global museum management software market:

By component: Solution, Collection management, Contact management, Event registration management, Ticketing solution, Membership management, Services, Consulting services, Training services

By deployment: cloud-based, web-based

By End User: Museum and Institutions, Fine Arts and Crafts, History, Legal Services

Regional Overview of Global Museum Management Software Market

Geographically, the Museum Management Software market report studies key producers, importers / exporters, and consumers, focuses on capacity, production, value, consumption, market share, and growth opportunities for the products in these key regions, covering: North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Central and South America, Middle East and Africa and others.

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Quantifiable data:

Breakdown of market data by key geography, type and application / end user
• By type (past and forecast)
• Sales and growth rate of application specific to the Museum Management Software Market (Historical and Forecast)
• Museum Management Software revenue, sales and growth rate by market (history and forecast)
• Museum Management Software market size and growth rate, segmentation like application and type (past and forecast)
• Year-over-year revenue, volume and growth rate (base year) of the Museum Management Software Market.

Museum Management Software Market Competition by Major Manufacturers as follows:

Various leaders as well as emerging players have been featured in this report, such as PastPerfect (US), Skin Soft (France), Museum Space (Bulgaria), CollectionSpace (US), Lucidea (Canada), Vernon Systems ( New Zealand), Versai, Modes (UK), Zetcom (Switzerland), Collection Harbor, which are an important part of the industry.

5 Crucial Insights Addressed In The Museum Management Software Market Report

Best Plans From Industry Experts Implemented During COVID-19 Pandemic
Regional overview and analysis taking into account that socio-economic factors
Government regulations that have a positive / negative impact on the industry in the future.
The latest technological developments and innovations concerning the article
Technological advancements that can shape the industry today and in the future.

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Table of Contents: Museum Management Software Market

Chapter 1: Museum Management Software Market Overview

Chapter 2: Market Status and Forecast by Regions

Chapter 3: Market Status and Forecast by Many Segments

Chapter 4: Market Status and Forecast by Downstream Industry

Chapter 5: Analysis of Market Drivers and Constraints

Chapter 6: Market Competition Status by Major Suppliers

Chapter 7: Major Manufacturers Overview and Market Data

Chapter 8: Upstream and Downstream Market Overview and Analysis

Chapter 9: Cost, Sales and Gross Margin Analysis

Chapter 10: Marketing Status Analysis

Chapter 11: Conclusion of Full Market Report

Chapter 12: Research Methodology and Reference

Continued……

Browse the complete table of contents @ https://straitsresearch.com/report/museum-management-software-market/toc

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The design of the exhibition by SITE

By Exhibition design No Comments

The WilliWear Men’s Showroom, c. 1982.
Photo: Andreas Sterzing

“I don’t design clothes for the queen; but for the people who wave to her when she walks by, ”said fashion designer Willi Smith, who drew many of his best ideas from street life in New York City. His label, WilliWear, was the first streetwear brand, and his clothes, released in the late 1970s, were modern, comfortable, and expressive – think oversized blazers and pants that all body types could wear, chunky knits and fabrics sourced from all over the world. (One of his most popular pieces was a one size fits all cargo pants with adjustable waistband.) Smith often sold models of his designs, so people could make his clothes at home. So, in the early 1980s, when he wanted to open his own showroom, he told James Wines, founder of the architecture and environmental art studio. TO PLACE, to make it “as far away from Ralph Lauren as possible”. Smith took Wines to his favorite haunts on the west side – Christopher St. Pier and nightclubs close – and as they walked around the area, he pointed out all of the materials and textures he loved. Wines thought: Let’s make the street.

Willi Smith (left) designed what he called “democratic” fashion. The streetscape-inspired showroom was a backdrop for the type of clothing he made (right). From left to right : Photo: Courtesy of Kim SteelePhoto: Peter Gould / Courtesy of Fashion Institute of Technology

Willi Smith (left) designed what he called “democratic” fashion. The streetscape-inspired showroom was a backdrop for the type of clothing he …
Willi Smith (left) designed what he called “democratic” fashion. The streetscape-inspired showroom was a backdrop for the type of clothing he made (right). From above: Photo: Courtesy of Kim SteelePhoto: Peter Gould / Courtesy of Fashion Institute of Technology

Under cover of night, Wines drove his Ford Explorer through the same areas Smith took him – which was being redeveloped and highway removal at a breakneck pace – and picked up all the trash he had. could find: rolls of chain link fencing, bricks, metal siding, shipping pallets and even stack cleats. The entirety of Smith’s office – which featured a huge desk that looked like two unfinished brick walls topped with glass – came from a single construction site. Every once in a while, they hit the jackpot: an overturned fire hydrant or a broken lamppost. “We were very careful not to affect public safety, but it was really like a game,” says Wines, whose job it is to abandon architectural conventions. “I like this idea of ​​the unwanted world, because you can do something with it.”

Set foot inside Smith Women’s Showroom, which opened on West 38th Street in 1982, was like stepping into an industrial downtown street, painted entirely in dark gray. The “Ghost cityscape”Was as much an artistic experience as a place to shop for clothes, as Smith intended, and paved the way for concept shops like Dover Street Market and Opening Ceremony. The stores belonged to the same universe for which the clothes were designed. He hung clothes directly on the chain link fences and posed mannequins sitting on concrete blocks, just like a person would on the street. When Smith held fashion shows in showrooms, models climbed fences, hung on pipes, and sat on fire hydrants. “It was an absolute genius to have designed, for the first major boutique of African-American fashion designers, an environmental framework that not only spoke to the designer’s creative vision for clothing, but also defined the man, the woman. politics and the social conditions of the time ”, the architect Jack Travis, writing. “The results were undeniable.

The WilliWear women’s showroom opened in 1982.
Photo: James Wines

So when Cooper Hewitt mounted a retrospective of Smith’s daring career in “Willi Smith: street sewing”, Which is open until October 24, there was no question of who would design the exhibition. It had to be SITE. Alexandra Cunningham Cameron, curator of the exhibition, said: “The SITE and WilliWear collaboration so perfectly represents two complementary value systems that collide to challenge the status quo, both transforming basic materials – a shovel, a skirt , a brick, a blazer – in an act of rebellion, a moment of becoming built by style and intelligence.

SITE traveled to the western part of Manhattan to find materials and inspiration for Smith’s showrooms. Here are some of the photos Wines took on his scouting trips in the 1980s. Photos: Courtesy of James Wines.

SITE traveled to the western part of Manhattan to find materials and inspiration for Smith’s showrooms. Here are some of the photos Wines took during her sc …
SITE traveled to the western part of Manhattan to find materials and inspiration for Smith’s showrooms. Here are some of the photos Wines took on his scouting trips in the 1980s. Photos: Courtesy of James Wines.

An exhibit on Willi Smith had to include his showroom in one way or another. But representing architecture in a gallery setting is always a challenge, as the experience of architecture requires a body in space. The photos, videos or models of a Smith showroom can go no further. So Wines, now 89, worked with Chermayeff Studio, production studio Supermatic, and his daughter Suzan’s wines, to recreate the most iconic elements of Smith’s showrooms and office – the collage of street artifacts, the masonry desk – in the gallery.

But for Wines, there was also an inherent tension in replicating this concept in the museum. “The whole environmental art movement in Soho in the ’70s and’ 80s, which I was a part of, was based on leaving galleries,” says Wines. “Our whole philosophy moved away from all these projectors, brackets, plinths and frames. We are all either in the landscape or in the street. (Some of SITE’s most famous works have been to transform big box retail stores into works of art which made the buildings appear to be collapsing or peeling off.) Plus, Cooper Hewitt is a Georgian mansion that once belonged to Andrew Carnegie. An iconic Upper East Side building is about as far removed as possible from Wines’ philosophy, which rejects architectural formalism, and the aesthetic of downtown Smith. Smith’s showrooms and office were set in large, raw industrial spaces with cement floors, exposed beams, and large windows. The gallery, meanwhile, has parquet floors, ornate carved moldings, coffered ceilings, and stained glass windows. “The idea of ​​exhibition space is a formalization of space,” says Wines. “It became this big problem of … How am I going to keep this in mind? How am I going to honor the artist?

Wines’ conceptual sketches for Cooper Hewitt’s exhibition on Willi Smith represented streetscapes in a state of dematerialization.
Illustration: Courtesy of James Wines

Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

Part of the appeal of the original exhibit hall was that the artifacts all existed in the city before they were assembled into a recreation of a downtown street. “In the 80s a lot of the energy was related to the harshness and the reality of the whole thing,” says Wines. “We tore up entire facades of buildings and were lucky enough to find all of these jagged buildings, so we had pretty much everything we needed to slip into the showroom and do this freewheeling collage. And Willi loved it, of course, and it was handy because you can hang clothes anywhere.

But SITE couldn’t attach anything to the museum’s wooden walls, or put artifacts directly on the floor, so they designed stand-alone exhibition platforms. In addition, the objects in the exhibition are now all precious. Ephemera like magazine articles, invitations to fashion shows and posters had to be placed in display cases to protect them. Wines was particularly shocked to learn that curators couldn’t always hang clothes directly on the exhibit structure, as Smith would have done in his shop. “How could touching pipes hurt a t-shirt?” »Notes on the wines. (Some of the Smith T-shirts once sold for $ 40 now go for $ 1,400.)

Wines designed a smaller version of Smith’s desk for the exhibit.
Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

SITE built Smith’s office in 1982 with materials salvaged from a Manhattan construction site.
Photo: James Wines

Wines also couldn’t surreptitiously source materials like they once did at midnight, as those abandoned buildings and demolished piles of materials no longer exist in the city. But Cat Garcia-Menocal, the construction manager at Supermatic, competed over materials from construction suppliers to get closer to what was in the original showroom. It was brand new, of course, not rough from years of wear and tear on the exterior. When it came time to recreate Smith’s site office, the designers scaled it down and used it to display some of his personal items, like his round plastic glasses.

Until the end, Wines wondered how the scenography of the exhibition would unfold. But when he was finally able to visit the exhibit in person (the museum reopened this summer after having to close for COVID just a week after the exhibit began), he was delighted to find that all Georgian adornments were ‘were faded into the background, as he’d hoped, and he felt as close to Smith’s world as he could be in 2021. I felt that, too. Walking from the wood-lined hallway of the museum and rounding the corner of the exhibit was exhilarating. He did not have the exact sense of reality that Wines described as having the original showrooms, but that’s understandable, and there was a feeling of awe. “It still looked like Willi Smith, there was still that sense of bonding,” Wines says. “We managed to do it, so it at least preserves the memory of the showroom.”

Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

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21st Century Museum Management Conference for Omani Specialists

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Entitled “The History of the Representation of Cultures in Museums and Cultural Centers”, the virtual webinar was moderated by Dr Paul Michael Taylor, Research Anthropologist at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Director of Asian Cultural History , European and Middle Eastern museum. Cultures and Director of the Asian Cultural History Program and Curator of Asian, European and Middle Eastern Ethnology.

Muscat: The National Museum, represented by the Learning Center and in collaboration with the United States Smithsonian Institution and the United States Embassy in Muscat, hosted the second in a series on Museum Management in the 21st Century for Omani specialists and students in the field of museums. .

The series is another sign of the strong partnership between Oman and the United States. Entitled “The History of the Representation of Cultures in Museums and Cultural Centers”, the virtual webinar was moderated by Dr Paul Michael Taylor, Research Anthropologist at Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, Director of Asian Cultural History , European and Middle Eastern museum. Cultures and Director of the Asian Cultural History Program and Curator of Asian, European and Middle Eastern Ethnology. It targeted employees of the National Museum, employees of public and private museums, employees of private art galleries, employees of cultural agencies and administrative divisions under the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Youth, in plus tourism students from Sultan Qaboos University and Oman University Tourism.

Dr Taylor will also be presenting three other lectures this year on a range of topics: “Virtual Exhibitions and Other Museum Uses of the Web”, “Program Development: Dynamic Program Development and Visitor Engagement” and “Museum or Museum Activities”. cultural centers “Modern: prosperity in the 21st century. In addition to a sixth talk on “Exhibition Development: A Case Study of Money as Material Culture: Acquisitions and Organization in the American Museum of Money”, by Douglas Mudd of the Colorado Museum of Money in the United States.

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Augusta’s First Amendment Museum secures exhibition design grants

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A render shows what the First Amendment Museum should look like once its renovation is complete. Image courtesy of the First Amendment Museum

AUGUSTA – The First Amendment Museum, located in Guy P. Gannett’s former home in Augusta, has won a grant of nearly $ 250,000 to complete the design of what officials say is its cutting-edge exhibit intended to inspire visitors to understand, practice and preserve their First Amendment rights of religion, speech, press, assembly and petition.

The federal $ 249,000 Museums for America grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services will be used to complete the design of the museum’s exhibit, which is slated to be installed as part of a $ 14 million overall restoration and expansion of the building.

The planned interactive exhibit, officials said, will allow visitors to meet, interact with and reflect on their rights by reinforcing the notion that citizens use and engage with the freedoms protected by the First Amendment. Each room in the museum will interpret a particular aspect of the First Amendment. A dystopian kitchen will show what life could be like in a society without the First Amendment, a “Censorship Library” will highlight books, movies and music that have been banned, a teenage bedroom will explore the discourse of youth and social media, and an exercise The Room will “engage kinesthetic learners,” according to a press release.

“This major grant will help us create a unique, interactive and relevant visitor experience” Co-founder of Genie Gannett and Chairman of the Board, and a granddaughter of Guy Gannett, said in the statement.

The non-partisan the museum is already open, with temporary exhibitions and guided interactive tours focused on the First Amendment and the five freedoms it protects: religion, speech, press, meeting and petition. Admission is free and the museum, located at 184 State St. next to Blaine House, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and, until September 4, Saturday.

Deborah Williams, director of outreach engagement for the First Amendment Museum, said on Monday that the exhibit will be worked on alongside the physical restoration and expansion of the 1911 building, which will likely begin next year with the aim of open the new exhibit at the end of 2023 or early 2024..

The exhibition will be created by the designer Helen Riegle of HER Design in Boston, whose portfolio includes “Dear Boston: Messages from the Marathon Memorial” from the Boston Public Library, “A Whole New Game” from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and “America on The Move” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

“The museum exhibits will show how Americans have used their First Amendment rights as a tool to move our society forward and to create that ‘more perfect union’ which is our civic burden,” said Christian Cotz, Managing Director of the museum. “But perhaps more importantly, these dynamic, stimulating and interactive exhibits will inspire people to live their freedoms and exercise their rights more intentionally and effectively.”

A fundraising campaign to fund the project is in its early stages, according to Jamie O’Brien, Director of Development. Donations can be made through the museum’s website.

The expansion will double the size of the facility and will be attached to the rear of the building.

Guy Gannett and his family lived in the house for about 10 years before moving to Portland when the publishing company he founded with his father purchased the Portland Press Herald. The Gannett Publishing Co. also owned the Waterville Sentinel, the Portland (Maine) Sunday Telegram, the Portland Evening Express and the Daily Kennebec Journal. They later expanded to broadcast media, but sold the company in 1998.


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Augusta’s First Amendment Museum secures exhibition design grants

By Exhibition design No Comments

A render shows what the First Amendment Museum should look like once its renovation is complete. Image courtesy of the First Amendment Museum

AUGUSTA – The First Amendment Museum, located in Guy P. Gannett’s former home in Augusta, won a grant of nearly $ 250,000 to complete the design of what officials say is his cutting-edge exhibit intended to inspire visitors to understand, practice and preserve their First Amendment rights to religion, speech, press, assembly and petition.

The federal $ 249,000 Museums for America grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services will be used to complete the design of the museum’s exhibit, which is slated to be installed as part of a $ 14 million overall restoration and expansion of the building.

The planned interactive exhibit, officials said, will allow visitors to meet, interact with and reflect on their rights by reinforcing the notion that citizens use and engage with the freedoms protected by the First Amendment. Each room in the museum will interpret a particular aspect of the First Amendment. A dystopian kitchen will show what life could be like in a society without the First Amendment, a “Censorship Library” will highlight books, movies and music that have been banned, a teenage bedroom will explore the discourse of youth and social media, and an exercise The Room will “engage kinesthetic learners,” according to a press release.

“This major grant will help us create a unique, interactive and relevant visitor experience” Co-founder of Genie Gannett and Chairman of the Board, and a granddaughter of Guy Gannett, said in the statement.

The non-partisan the museum is already open, with temporary exhibitions and guided interactive tours focused on the First Amendment and the five freedoms it protects: religion, speech, press, meeting and petition. Admission is free and the museum, located at 184 State St. next to Blaine House, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and, until September 4, Saturday.

Deborah Williams, director of outreach engagement for the First Amendment Museum, said on Monday that the exhibit will be worked on alongside the physical restoration and expansion of the 1911 building, which will likely begin next year with the aim of open the new exhibit at the end of 2023 or early 2024..

The exhibition will be created by the designer Helen Riegle of HER Design in Boston, whose portfolio includes “Dear Boston: Messages from the Marathon Memorial” from the Boston Public Library, “A Whole New Game” from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and “America on The Move” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

“The museum exhibits will show how Americans have used their First Amendment rights as a tool to move our society forward and to create that ‘more perfect union’ which is our civic burden,” said Christian Cotz, Managing Director of the museum. “But perhaps more importantly, these dynamic, stimulating and interactive exhibits will inspire people to live their freedoms and exercise their rights more intentionally and effectively.”

A fundraising campaign to fund the project is in its early stages, according to Jamie O’Brien, Director of Development. Donations can be made through the museum’s website.

The expansion will double the size of the facility and will be attached to the rear of the building.

Guy Gannett and his family lived in the house for about 10 years before moving to Portland when the publishing company he founded with his father purchased the Portland Press Herald. The Gannett Publishing Co. also owned the Waterville Sentinel, the Portland (Maine) Sunday Telegram, the Portland Evening Express and the Daily Kennebec Journal. They later expanded to broadcast media, but sold the company in 1998.


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Top Companies, Trends, Growth Factors Details by Regions, Types and Applications

By Museum art No Comments

Global Museum Art Market Report Added By MarketstudyReport.com Offers Analysis Of Industry Size, Share, Growth, Trends And Forecast Till 2026. Museum art market also covers the major key players, five forces analysis and market segmentation in detail. This report examines the global museum art market and provides revenue information for the period 2021 to 2026.

The research report on the Museum Art Market involves a thorough analytical examination and presentation of the current and future scenario of this industry vertical. According to the study, the market is expected to exhibit a healthy growth rate and generate substantial returns during the analysis period.

Request a sample Museum Art Delivery Market Report at: https://www.marketstudyreport.com/request-a-sample/3167812?utm_source=algos&utm_medium=Pravin

Valuable insights regarding key industry trends, market size, growth opportunities, and industry revenue projections are also included in the market analysis. The report further draws attention to various industry segmentations and competitive backdrop of major players.

In addition, the report discusses the various changes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic to provide a conclusive analysis of this commercial sphere.

Other takeaways from the museum’s art delivery market:

  • The report comprises a comprehensive examination of the competitive landscape of the Art Museum Handing Market defined by companies like
    • Agility
    • DHL
    • DB Schenker
    • Iron Mountain (Crozier)
    • Crown
    • MTAB
    • Freight systems
    • Etna
    • Fine arts logistics
    • Workshop 4
    • Grace
    • Helu-Trans
    • USArt
    • Yamato
    • Katolec
    • Mithals
    • Sinotrans
    • Deppon
    • Globaliner
    • Michele

    .

  • The product catalog of listed companies, along with product specifications and main applications are illustrated in the report.
  • Other critical aspects such as the product pricing model, market position and revenue margins of each company are presented.
  • Based on product line, the museum art delivery market is classified into
    • Transport
    • Packaging
    • Storage
    • Other

    .

  • Details regarding market share, sales model and compensation for each product segment are well documented in the report.
  • In terms of scope, the museum art delivery market is divided into
    • Public museum
    • Private museum
    • Museum exhibition

    .

  • Substantial information regarding the sales volume and total revenue represented by each application during the study period is provided.
  • The business aspects such as the rate to market and the market concentration rate are also analyzed in depth.
  • Additionally, the study examines the market strategies employed by key industry competitors.

Request a discount on the Museum Art Delivery Market Report at: https://www.marketstudyreport.com/check-for-discount/3167812?utm_source=algos&utm_medium=Pravin

An overview of the regional landscape of the museum art delivery market:

  • According to the report, the regional terrain of the Art Museum Handling market is divided into several regional markets including North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East, and Africa .
  • The market shares and returns accumulated by each region in recent years are taken into account.
  • Informative data affirming the revenue projections and estimates of the growth rate to be recorded by each region during the forecast period is highlighted in the report.

Contents:

Study coverage: It includes key manufacturers covered, key market segments, the range of products offered in the Museum Art market, years considered, and study objectives. In addition, it touches on the segmentation study provided in the report based on product type and application.

Summary: It gives a summary of key studies, Art Museum market growth rate, competitive landscape, market drivers, trends and issues, and macroscopic metrics.

Production by region: Here, the report provides import and export information, production, revenue, and major players in all regional markets studied.

Manufacturer Profile: Each player presented in this section is studied on the basis of a SWOT analysis, its products, production, value, capacity and other vital factors.

For more details on this report: https://www.marketstudyreport.com/reports/global-museum-art-handing-market-2021-by-company-regions-type-and-application-forecast-to-2026

Some of the main highlights of the table of contents cover:

Regional Museum Art Delivery Market Analysis

  • Museum art production by region
  • World production of works of art presented to museums by region
  • Global revenue from the distribution of works of art in museums by region
  • Consumption of works of art in museums by region

Museum Art Delivery Segment Market Analysis (by Type)

  • Global Museum Art Presentation Production by Type
  • Global Museum Art Distribution Revenue by Type
  • Award of the presentation of works of art to the museum by type

Museum Art Delivery Segment Market Analysis (By Application)

  • Global Museum Art Presentation Consumption By Application
  • Global Museum Art Consumption Market Share by Application (2014-2019)

Major Manufacturers Analysis of Museum Art Shed

  • Museum art production sites and area served
  • Product overview, application and specifications
  • Production, Revenue, Ex-factory Price and Gross Margin of Museum Works of Art Management (2014-2019)
  • Main activities and markets served

To learn more about related reports, please visit: https://www.marketwatch.com/press-release/Along-with-CAGR-of-27-Know-How-Hydrocyclone-Market-size-is- growing-in-key-regions- reaching-to-the-next-level-in-the-coming-years-2021-07-24

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Mather & Cie | exhibition design partner for Inverness Castle

By Exhibition design No Comments

Mather & Cie, one of the leading consultants in tourist attractions and exhibition design, was announced by the Highland Council as the successful exhibition designer for the project to transform Inverness Castle into a world-class tourist attraction.

Since its establishment in 1995, the company has worked on the design of many popular and successful exhibitions, tourist attractions, tours and museums around the world. With 25 years of experience in the industry, Mather & Co is able to come up with new and innovative ways to tell stories, engage visitors and attract new audiences.

Previous projects include Downton Abbey: the exhibition; The ultimate ride to the Silverstone experience; The experience of the Royal Mint; and the R&A World of Golf Museum in St Andrews.

Chris Mather, CEO, Mather & Co; Fiona Hampton, Director, Inverness Castle; Sarah Clarke, Managing Director, Mather & Co. inside the entrance to Inverness Castle. Image credit: Ewen Weatherspoon

Transform Inverness Castle

Mather & Co will bring this rich experience to the transformation of Inverness Castle and to the development of the “Spirit of the Highlands” project. Their approach will take into account the entire visitor experience, including what people see and interact with before, during and after their visit. The project will ensure that everyone who visits the castle has a memorable time and will want to visit it again in the future.

Celebrating and interpreting “the spirit of the highlands” in 100 stories will be the central theme of the visitor experience. The tender invited the successful company to develop and explore this theme in imaginative and unexpected ways, encouraging people to visit other places around the Highlands.

“The appointment of Mather & Co as exhibition designers for the project is an important step in the transformation of Inverness Castle”, states Fergus ewing MSP, co-chair of the Inverness Castle Delivery Group.

“Their vast experience across a diverse range of tourist attractions across the world will be a welcome contribution to the development of the castle as a gateway to Highland tourism, as well as a place that locals and visitors alike will have. looking forward to visiting again and again. “

Chris mather, CEO of Mather & Co, adds: “We are delighted to be part of the project team and start by creating a first class and compelling attraction – showcasing the rich heritage of the Highlands and Islands and the castle itself. -same “

Inverness Castle Project
Image credit LDN Architects srl

A world-class tourist attraction for the Highlands

High Life Highland is the managing agent of the Highland Council in the project to transform Inverness Castle into a tourist attraction for the Highlands. The transformation of Inverness Castle is supported by an investment of £ 15million from the Scottish government and £ 3million from the UK government as part of the Inverness and Highlands area agreement.

The project aims to create a gateway for Highland tourism, helping to revitalize tourism across the region and provide investment to the industry as it recovers from the pandemic. It will support economic growth throughout the Highland region, creating a long-lasting must-see attraction celebrating the spirit of the Highlands.

The Inverness and Highland City Region Agreement is a joint initiative supported by an investment of up to £ 315million from the UK and Scottish governments, the Highland Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the University of the Highlands and Islands, aimed at to stimulate sustainable regional economic growth.

Mather & Co is a experienced multidisciplinary design consultancy based in Chesire, UK. It offers a flexible and adaptable service, adapted to the needs of each client.

Top image credits LDN Architects srl

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Exhibition Design Internship – New York, NY, US | Works

By Exhibition design No Comments

The Whitney is paid Fall internship of the academic year program offers a one-semester internship for undergraduate and graduate students currently enrolled in an accredited academic program. For fall 2021, interns will commit 16 to 21 hours per week for 10 to 12 weeks for a total of 200 hours. The decision of whether the internship will be virtual or hybrid has not been determined.

Please review department descriptions and refer to the list of departments requesting interns on the Application tab – not all departments will accept interns for the fall semester.

Strong points:

  • Allowance of $ 3,000 (requirement of 200 hours for the semester)
  • Interns are assigned to a specific department of the museum for the duration
  • Monthly lecture series featuring museum professionals from across the Museum
  • Interns are eligible for course credit

Qualifications:

  • Undergraduates and graduates currently enrolled in accredited university programs are eligible.
  • Applicants must have completed a minimum of two years of academic courses. First year students are not eligible.
  • Some positions may require university level training and / or work experience, noted in department descriptions.
  • While a demonstrated interest in art and art history is preferred, students of all majors are encouraged to apply.
  • Previous museum experience is not required.

Instructions for application

  • TO RESUME Use the following naming convention when uploading your CV: LAST NAME_FIRST NAME_RESUME.pdf
  • COVER LETTER Think about how Whitney’s mission relates to your background and life experience, explain your reasons for applying to the internship program, and describe what you hope to gain from this experience.
  • GRAPHIC DESIGN Wallet is required. Please download to the app.
  • To apply, please complete a form located on the Museum’s website: https://whitney.org/About/JobPostings

The submission deadline is: August 16, 2021, and the internship will start the week of September 27, 2021.

Specific to the department:

Projects / work assignments:

The trainee of the exhibition design department will provide support in the design of exhibitions at different stages of planning:

  • Interns will participate in departmental design carts and meetings with exhibition curators to review design concepts and artistic layouts, as well as planning meetings involving colleagues from across the institution (via Zoom and in person)
  • Interns will also help create artistic layouts, scale mockups of the artwork, study models, large scale mockups and presentation materials.
  • Whenever possible, trainees will observe and assist on the ground during construction and installation.

Skills and qualifications required, including technological skills:

  • Enrolled in a related architecture or design program
  • 2D drawing skills, preferably Vectorworks, 3D modeling skills, preferably Rhino and V-Ray, and proficiency in Adobe Suite.
  • Ease with the construction of study and finishing models
  • Ability to think abstractly and creatively
  • Attention to detail
  • Good communication skills
  • Ability to work in a flexible and fast-paced environment on concurrent projects
  • When applying, applicants must provide a link to their design portfolio

Training to be provided:

  • Trainees will be exposed to the process of making exhibitions from concept to installation and the role of exhibition design in this process.
  • Interns will work alongside designers and curators to develop the narrative and environment of an exhibition.
  • Interns will learn the tools designers use to communicate spatial and conceptual ideas to curators and the institution as a whole. This includes training in developing scale models of the artwork, working with architectural models from the exhibition, developing larger scale models, developing architectural drawings, and critically examining the art. artistic layout in terms of conservation narrative.

Results:

  • Learn the skills to help assess art checklists, develop three-dimensional thinking with 2D and 3D work, learn the fundamentals of exhibition design planning.
  • Gain insight into how a large museum of this stature works and how other departments affect the design of an exhibit.

About the Whitney

The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, houses the largest collection of American art of the 20th and 21st centuries. From his vision was born the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has championed America’s most innovative art for 86 years. The heart of The Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret and exhibit the American art of our time and to serve a wide range of audiences to celebrate the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. . Through this mission and an unwavering commitment to the artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force for modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in art. American today.

TEE declaration

The Whitney Museum of American Art is an Equal Opportunity Employer. The Museum does not discriminate on the basis of age, sex, religion, race, color, creed, national origin, alienation or citizenship, disability, marital status, partner status, veteran status, sex (including gender identity), sexual orientation or any other factor prohibited by law. The Museum hires and promotes people solely on the basis of their qualifications for the position to be filled. The Museum encourages all qualified applicants to apply for vacancies at all levels. This description should not be interpreted as a contract of any kind for a specific period of employment.

Manual :

To apply, please complete a form located on the Museum’s website: https://whitney.org/About/JobPostings


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Western Colorado University’s Masters in Gallery and Museum Management Costs Under $ 20,000

By Museum management No Comments

Western Colorado University’s Masters in Gallery and Museum Management was founded with art professionals in mind. This graduate program is structured to be maximally affordable, flexible, and feasible for anyone looking to advance their career as a curator.

Western’s Masters in Gallery and Museum Management (MGMM) explores the various aspects of running a museum or gallery, from meeting client needs and managing collections to restoration and l ‘business Administration. The degree covers design, preparation, installation, and conservation, helping students broaden their broad professional experience in the arts industry by gaining managerial skills and practical expertise in the field of their choice.

MGMM is a low-residency ‘hybrid’ program consisting of online courses that students can take from anywhere in the world, combined with a two-week summer campus internship and a gallery internship. art or museum of their choice. Because of this flexibility, graduates progress through the program at personalized paces and intensities that match their personal and professional commitments. Those enrolled full-time can graduate in just 15 months, while part-time students can complete the program in two to four years.

MGMM is offered through competitive state university education, with scholarships and financial aid available. International students can apply for visas. Most students receive some form of scholarship, so the total bill for tuition is less than $ 20,000. Additional financial assistance is also available.

Western Colorado University is currently accepting applications for this fully accredited professional terminal master’s degree.

To learn more about Western Colorado University’s Masters in Gallery and Museum Management, visit western.edu.

Up to three finalists will be shortlisted for this $ 390,000 commission, each of whom will receive $ 2,000 in design costs to generate project proposals.


The Highwaymen paintings are an environmental time capsule for a state at great risk from the climate crisis.


A double portrait of the dancer and icon of the Harlem Renaissance at Swann Galleries evokes his allure of a model artist and his indelible imprint on modernism.


Material from the 1800s to contemporary times includes artwork by Tom of Finland, Gerda Wegener, and JEB, as well as lesbian pulp fiction and more, all available August 19.


Doerte Weber’s weavings reproduce the ubiquitous charts and graphs related to infection rates, deaths and unemployment.



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Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum Art Heist gets another narrative in new Netflix docuseries

By Museum art No Comments

After more than 30 years, the story of the Isabella Stewart Gardner museum burglary has all the attributes of a spectacular drama about a real crime. The thief’s disguises, thugs and missing artwork valued at over $ 500 million have captivated and baffled law enforcement, journalists, book authors and podcast hosts. Yet no matter how many people look into the facts, the crime remains unsolved.

The new four-part Netflix docuseries “This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist,” which premieres April 7, isn’t expected to put anyone behind bars anytime soon. But it will potentially introduce a new audience to the remarkable event and its seemingly endless number of weird characters and rabbit hole theories. Besides getting an entertaining fix and then spending the night, the hope of another Gardner tale, one presumes, is that the show could finally get someone who knows something to talk.

Told in four “chapters” of over 50 minutes, the first tells the story of the crime through a combination of dramatization, archival photographs, television news footage and ongoing interviews. At a minimum, the visual juxtaposition of yesterday and today serves as a stark reminder of the time that has passed. The people originally involved in the case have retired; suspects were murdered or died of natural causes. Even the boxy cars and clunky technology (convincingly portrayed in the scenes staged by the Berkshire Theater Group) suggest it’s time to pass the torch to a new generation of sleuths who are getting closer with each passing year.

The series opens with witnesses who say they saw two men dressed as Boston police officers sitting in a hatchback on Palace Road just outside the museum in the wee hours of March 18, 1990. A scene recreated shows the “officers” entered by telling museum security guard Richard Abath that they were investigating a disturbance. After handcuffing and blindfolding Abath and another guard, the thieves moved between the galleries for over an hour, littering the floor with broken glass and emptying the golden frames. A total of 13 pieces left the venue that night, including Rembrandt’s unique Seascape (“Christ in the Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee”) and a Vermeer (“The Concert”), precious for its stunning sound. use of light and the limited number of his paintings in circulation.

While the first chapter drops several suspicious seeds to nurture later in the series, it does so impartially, without the thrilling music or sticky storytelling that makes other true crime dramas feel forced (strangely, both appear in the trailer). Instead, and preferably, it allows interviewees to showcase the museum’s intimidating Italian-inspired architecture, the incomparably arranged collection and the mastermind behind it, Isabella Stewart Gardner. Other reports on the heists, such as WBUR and The Boston Globe’s in depth Last seen podcast of 2018, gave him the same respect.

After a year without an actual gallery tour, seeing the interior of the museum was surprisingly poignant. So is Anne Hawley, former director of the Gardner and lead interviewee who recaps the crime and briefly points out that she is the first woman to oversee the world-class museum. She took the reins just six months before the heist, and footage presumably filmed the next morning shows her in shock. What a plate she was served and what a life she gave to the Gardner during her 25-year tenure.

Not all true crime aficionados will patiently wait for the juiciest stuff from who did it and why. The second chapter gets bogged down somewhat trying to explore the vulnerabilities of the museum and the more obvious theory that, like the majority of art thefts, this was internal work. For this reason, Abath always has sidelong glances. (Okay, he would go to work stoned sometimes, and photos from that night show him with long, curly hair, a tie-dyed t-shirt and a fanny pack, ready to attend a Grateful Dead concert.) former colleague Net describes him as the “type of hippie who’s good at chess,” a combo as overwhelming as the one who let thieves in. The series spices up with absurd humor.

Anne Hawley, Director Emeritus of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, shown at a post-theft press conference in an image from “This Is a Robbery: The World’s Biggest Art Heist”. (Courtesy of Netflix)

No charges have ever been laid against Abath for this crime and the series sidesteps the dramatic potential to convey the terror he and his guard mate must have felt that night. (The other guard does not appear and often refuses interviews.) Although chapter two points out a number of peculiarities of the case (such as the disappearance of the duct tape used on the guards), this did not please me. left hanging as I hope to watch serial programs. I rarely want to hold my hand, but at the time it felt necessary.

Chapter Three redeemed that desire with a captivating glimpse into the range of known criminals with Mafia connections who have at one time or another been in the circle of heist suspects. The last chapter narrows down that list. There is a suggestion that in order to resolve this matter the answers must be found among the living. Once again, I found myself wanting something that I don’t usually have, a tidier ending like one of those pesky reporter ambush scenes that catch a suspect in his robe, searching for the newspaper. in the morning.

Series director Colin Barnicle, who produced “This Is a Robbery” through his production company he started with his brother Nick Barnicle, told The Berkshire Eagle that he has been working on the series for five or six. years. (The brothers also produced “Billy Joel: New York State of Mind,” a chronicle of the singer’s sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden.) For this series, Barnicle used comments from several current and former Boston Globe reporters. , including Stephen Kurkjian. , who wrote “Master Thieves: The Boston Gangsters Who Pulled Off the World’s Greatest Art Heist” and was a consultant producer on “Last Seen”. Globe’s parent company CEO Linda Pizzuti Henry was executive producer of the Netflix series.

Without making any shocking discoveries, “This Is a Robbery” offers a glimpse into what has happened then and since and may lead some viewers to further research. At this point, the heist has become a staple in Boston lore. As always, Boston can’t shake the lure of its history of white gangsters, especially when Irish and Italian crowds clash with each other or with elite institutions. With theories like these in the mix, the Gardner Heist story finds people unwittingly rooted for criminals, or art, or maybe both. We may never know exactly what happened that morning on Palace Road. But the mystery of the heist proved to be both intoxicating and enduring.

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