15 minutes not enough to get lost in the Andy Warhol Museum – Art & Culture

Mr. Taufiqurrahman (The Jakarta Post)

Pittsburgh, United States ●
Tue 28 January 2020

2020-01-28
12:15
768
7f440ff09e92db75a02bbad20614ab58
1
Art & Culture
Andy-Warhol,Museum,pop-art,Pittsburgh
Free

Pop art icon Andy Warhol, born Andrew Warhola in Pittsburgh in 1928, has a bit of everything for everyone.

For music fans with a voracious appetite for rock history, he was considered the grandfather of punk and glam rock, having orchestrated the creation of New York’s flagship band Velvet Underground, which many considered a source. inspiration for the greatest rock stars, from David Bowie to La vive jeunesse.

The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon’s largest collection of artwork and archives. (The Jakarta Post/M. Taufiqurrahman)

In 1971 Bowie wrote “Andy Warhol” as a tribute to the artist and included it as one of the tracks on his critically acclaimed record. Hunky-dory. Warhol despised the song, however.

Before his death in 1987, Warhol also left an indelible mark on popular music with some of his visual work gracing some of pop’s best-selling records from the Rolling Stones sticky fingers to jazz guitar maestro Kenny Burrell Flight. 2.

For movie buffs, Warhol will be best remembered for his hard-hitting releases like underground experimental film. Chelsea Girls, as well as the inauguration screen test, which upsets the basic idea of ​​cinema.

The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon's largest collection of artwork and archives.The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon’s largest collection of artwork and archives. (The Jakarta Post/M. Taufiqurrahman)

Some fans of Warhol’s theatrical releases went on to make their own films and received critical acclaim themselves. British director Steve McQueen said he was most influenced by Warhol’s 1964 release Couchin which one actor reclines on a couch while another reclines on the top of the backrest, staring at him.

It is also difficult not to judge the merit of the films of Hollywood director Gus Van Sant without taking into account the influence of Warhol.

And then, of course, Warhol’s imminent presence in the visual arts, where he played a key role in merging the intellectual and the intellectual, the sacred and the profane, while successfully predicting the era social media, where anyone can be famous for 15 minutes and instant photography becomes the main means of communication.

If the sight of a Campbell’s soup can can immediately bring to mind Warhol’s most famous work of art, then the artist’s reputation as the world’s most celebrated visual artist is assured, no questions asked. .

So even for the most casual art lover, it would be a mistake not to visit the Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh if they make the trip to this industrial city.

Not only does the Andy Warhol Museum hold the largest collection of the pop artist’s artwork and archival material, it is also one of the world’s most comprehensive and most comprehensive single-artist museums. great of America.

And despite its reputation as the largest single-artist museum in North America, given Warhol’s voracious appetite for hoarding, some of the archival material, especially serial works Time capsulesare only partially displayed to visitors.

the Time capsulesexhibited on the third floor of the museum, consists of 610 containers filled with ephemera documenting Warhol’s life, ranging from taxidermy, copies of invitations to social gatherings to hundreds of cassettes and videotapes documenting his life and that of of his surroundings.

Some of the elements of the Time capsules collection could certainly bear witness to some of the more eccentric aspects of Warhol’s life; the fact that he was a fan of taxidermy or that he always wanted all his famous friends to sign the gift they intended to give him.

But those interested in learning more about a more personal side of Warhol should head to the second floor, where an exhibit called Andy Warhol: Revelation is currently on display. Running through February 16, this is the first exhibition of its kind to examine Warhol’s complex relationship with the faith of his youth, Catholicism.

As a gay man in New York and exploring the theme of sexuality for his art, Warhol had a conflicted relationship with his parents’ faith, but religious imagery continued to figure prominently in his art.

Born into a devout Byzantine Catholic family, Warhol grew up attending weekly church services at his local church with his mother Julia Warhola and throughout his life the pop art icon retained some of his Catholic practices while his peers attempted to distance themselves from their religious background.

In addition to paintings and a multimedia exhibit featuring video of a sunset over Los Angeles and sound accompanied by a haunting recitation of haiku by his muse Christa Päffgen, known by her stage name Nico, is Warhol’s heartfelt love letter to what he saw as a comforting myth that had shaped his childhood memories.

Some of the best-known images of Catholicism, the scene of the Last Supper, Raphael’s Madonna and mona-lisaall receive a pop-art treatment, being reproduced, copied and splashed with a typical Warhol hue, the only tribute he knows how to give.

The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon's largest collection of artwork and archives. The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon’s largest collection of artwork and archives. (The Jakarta Post/M. Taufiqurrahman)

Catholicism isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when talking about Warhol, but soon after leaving the museum’s second floor, everyone is sure to get a new perspective on the artist’s life. “The exhibition will present a new perspective on the artist,” said chief curator Jose Carlos Diaz.

The most fascinating collection, however, are hundreds of photographs taken by Warhol throughout his life, a treasure trove that might remind everyone that Warhol was indeed the prophet of our post-modern era, the one who could predict our era saturated with images.

Warhol took his camera everywhere he went, desperately trying to document everything and everyone around him and eventually produced nearly 130,000 images with his much-loved 35mm Minox compact camera. Many more were shot on his Polaroid camera, resulting in a slightly melancholy, faded palette.

Many of the photos on display at the Andy Warhol Museum document ordinary moments in the pop-art icon’s life, including nude snapshots of members of his famous entourage. Others are photos of ordinary objects; bananas, eggs, coke bottles, neon signs and building facades that wouldn’t be out of place in today’s social media personality’s Instagram feeds.

Yet it was also these photos that Warhol would later use as the basis for his screen-printed portraits and colored ink canvases.

The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon's largest collection of artwork and archives. The Andy Warhol Museum in downtown Pittsburgh houses the pop-art icon’s largest collection of artwork and archives. (The Jakarta Post/M. Taufiqurrahman)

Now, we can certainly believe Warhol when he said, “I didn’t believe in art; I believed in photography.


Comments are closed.