Exhibition design – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 06:18:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://expo-monet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-63-120x120.png Exhibition design – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ 32 32 Iwan Maktabi and cc-Tapis present the Women in Design exhibition https://expo-monet.com/iwan-maktabi-and-cc-tapis-present-the-women-in-design-exhibition/ https://expo-monet.com/iwan-maktabi-and-cc-tapis-present-the-women-in-design-exhibition/#respond Sun, 07 Nov 2021 11:00:40 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/iwan-maktabi-and-cc-tapis-present-the-women-in-design-exhibition/ On the occasion of Downtown Design Dubai, Iwan Maktabi’s research and experimentation platform “Iwan Maktabi Lab” takes over warehouse 32 on Alserkal avenue with a series of exhibitions and cultural events. Throughout the month of November, the Iwan Maktabi Lab will honor women in design. “Women in Design” is an exhibition presenting a range of […]]]>

On the occasion of Downtown Design Dubai, Iwan Maktabi’s research and experimentation platform “Iwan Maktabi Lab” takes over warehouse 32 on Alserkal avenue with a series of exhibitions and cultural events. Throughout the month of November, the Iwan Maktabi Lab will honor women in design. “Women in Design” is an exhibition presenting a range of cc-carpets collections honoring avant-garde designers, an exhibition that highlights the research and ideas that shape the world of interiors. Creators who challenge traditional craftsmanship and cultural production techniques, merging them with contemporary ideas.

The latest works by Patricia Urquiola, Mae Engelgeer, Faye Toogood, Sabine Marcelis, Cristina Celestino and Bethan Laura Wood designed for cc-Tapis will be on display. Collections such as Paysage, Stroke and Patcha exhibited at Milan Design Week will be presented for the first time in the Middle East. Allowing guests from all over the world to see, touch and experience each piece.

“Just as my father encouraged me and my sisters early in our careers, I strongly encourage every woman to pursue her vocation. Because at the end of the day you find your strength and autonomy in what you do and what you give to your community. Says Mona Maktabi, co-founder of Iwan Maktabi.

Design conference
Nadine Kanso and Bethan Laura Wood
moderated by Alya AlShaibani

As part of Iwan Maktabi Lab’s devotion to promoting appreciation of the arts, the collections will be presented alongside a conversation between designers Sabine Marcelis and Bethan Laura Wood moderated by Alya AlShaibani, Head of the Women’s Pavilion and Country Manager at Expo 2020 Dubai.

The moderated conference will take place on Monday, November 8, to discuss the ideas shaping the world of design.


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OMA Takes Exhibition Design to New Levels at Reopened Denver Art Museum | New https://expo-monet.com/oma-takes-exhibition-design-to-new-levels-at-reopened-denver-art-museum-new/ https://expo-monet.com/oma-takes-exhibition-design-to-new-levels-at-reopened-denver-art-museum-new/#respond Tue, 26 Oct 2021 22:06:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/oma-takes-exhibition-design-to-new-levels-at-reopened-denver-art-museum-new/ anchor Photograph by James Florio As part of the recently reopened Denver Art Museum renovation project, the OMA transformed the design galleries of the iconic Martin Building to better display, display and communicate the museum’s strong holdings in architecture and design. The redesigned space includes two new galleries and an educational studio named in honor […]]]>
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Photograph by James Florio

As part of the recently reopened Denver Art Museum renovation project, the OMA transformed the design galleries of the iconic Martin Building to better display, display and communicate the museum’s strong holdings in architecture and design.

The redesigned space includes two new galleries and an educational studio named in honor of the designer and art collector Ellen Bruss.

Photograph by James Florio

OMA’s Shohei Shigematsu described the opportunity to work in Ponti’s seminal work as “an exciting exercise,” offering his opinion that “Much like its design philosophy, the role of design appears to be growing and diversifying exponentially. A direct consequence of the ubiquity of design is accessibility and literacy, and we wanted galleries to respond to these changes.

Photograph by James Florio

“The three spaces offer new ways of seeing and interacting with objects and materials,” he continued. “They present different spatial and programmatic identities but collectively function as a platform to move discourse beyond mere consumption of design, incorporating movement, eerie perspectives and intimacy.”

Photograph by James Florio

By dissecting the existing space on Level 1 of the museum’s Stanton Gallery, Shigematsu and his team succeeded in creating a new 11,500 square foot space on two levels in the form of dual Mezzanine and Design galleries complemented by Studio Bruss.

Photograph by James Florio

The 7,750 square foot design gallery is anchored in a central open-air plaza surrounded by an alternating sequence of exhibition spaces with room for a diverse range of objects that can easily be adapted to meet the needs of exhibition of its curators. Above, the 1,900 square foot Mezzanine Gallery pays homage to Ponti’s changing volumes. Its display catalog offers visitors “layers of perspective”. The studio then functions as a bookend for the galleries and offers a fluid range of programming through a series of hinged walls that use the Italian designer’s composition techniques to better create an interactive hands-on experience.

Photograph by James Florio

“Working with the DAM team on the galleries and the architecture and design studio was a particularly meaningful way for us to continue our collaboration with the museum,” OMA associate Christy Cheng said in a statement. . “Architectural and design objects are objects that people come across every day, and we loved working with DAM to think about how best to tell the stories behind these objects so that the visitor understands design as a process. . “

Photograph by James Florio

Two permanent exhibitions will inaugurate the new spaces focusing on Ponti’s work as well as the re-examination of DAM’s own collection. Attendance is still very limited due to precautions related to COVID-19. You will find more information on visiting the museum here.




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“A Creative Polymath”: Isamu Noguchi’s Life Explored in New Barbican Exhibition https://expo-monet.com/a-creative-polymath-isamu-noguchis-life-explored-in-new-barbican-exhibition/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/a-creative-polymath-isamu-noguchis-life-explored-in-new-barbican-exhibition/ As the Barbican prepares to show the Japanese-American designer and sculptor’s first retrospective in 20 years, we explore his life, his inspirations and his work. Through Molly long September 9, 2021 13:39 September 9, 2021 13:39 “Was he a designer? A sculptor ? A landscaper? The answer is yes, ”according to Barbican curator Florence Ostende. […]]]>

As the Barbican prepares to show the Japanese-American designer and sculptor’s first retrospective in 20 years, we explore his life, his inspirations and his work.

“Was he a designer? A sculptor ? A landscaper? The answer is yes, ”according to Barbican curator Florence Ostende.

Ostend is hosting the next Barbican exhibition on Japanese-American designer and artist Isamu Noguchi. The showcase will be the first retrospective of the designer’s work in Europe for over 20 years and will explore his life, work and method of creation.

The design world knows Noguchi because of his contributions to the modernist design canon. In this regard, he made a name for himself working in the field of lighting and furniture. But as Ostend explains, Noguchi was a lot to a lot of people. Along with design, being the “creative polymath” that he was, she says he worked in disciplines as diverse as stage set design, sculpture, painting and even dance.

Portrait of Isamu Noguchi, July 4, 1947. Photograph by Arnold Newman © Arnold Newman Collection / Getty Images / INFGM / ARS – DACS

“The need to move from one thing to another”

Born to a Japanese father and an American mother in 1904, the beginning of Noguchi’s career was marked by an apprenticeship with the sculptor of Romanian origin Constantin Brâncuși in Paris. The relationship would flourish despite a considerable language barrier and, as Ostend explains, it was the start of a life of working relationships and close collaborations for the designer.

The Barbican exhibit will focus on two of Noguchi’s most successful collaborators: choreographer Martha Graham and architect, inventor and futurist R. Buckminster Fuller. These relationships were characterized by “deep dialogues,” says Ostend.

Buckminster Fuller, with his humanistic approach to the environment and the concept of “utopia,” had a particular impact on Noguchi, she adds. “Noguchi believed that art and design were closely related to invention,” says Ostend, explaining the friendship. In pursuit of this belief, she says he even took pre-medical training, as well as studies in biology to understand the world around him. “It was seeing the world that really brought him closer to so many different practitioners.”

These collaborations catalyzed a way of working that Noguchi was already practicing, says Ostend. “He often described his way of working with the need to move from one thing to another,” she says. “Noguchi often had multiple jobs in progress at the same time and rarely focused on just one. “

Akari (1953). Models; 27N, 2N, BB3-70FF, BB2-S1 14A, BB1-YA1, 31N © INFGM / ARS – DACS / Le Musée Kagawa

“He was deeply affected by the devastation caused by World War II”

The Akari lamp – or “light sculpture” as it is often called – is establishing itself as one of Noguchi’s most famous creations, and Ostend says it will be treated as such in the exhibition. Made from traditional Japanese washi paper and new bulb technology at the time, it was an example of the designer’s deliberate mix between the old and the new.

Despite its light, modernist aesthetic, the Akari story is sad, says Ostend. Noguchi developed the design in the 1950s, while traveling through Japan. “He was deeply affected by the devastation that World War II had caused in the country,” says Ostende, who adds that he went to Hiroshima to see firsthand the damage from the atomic bomb.

At the height of her career around this time, she explains that while on a trip, Noguchi was asked how he could help revitalize the struggling post-war Japanese economy. The Akari, based on traditional Japanese paper lanterns, was his answer.

As for how the exhibition will use ‘light sculpture’, Ostend worked closely with set designer Lucy Styles who was associated with the project. One of Styles’ challenges was to ensure that the lamps were the “main source of light” throughout the show, says Ostend. “This will be the portal through which you experience the rest of the exhibition,” she adds, likening its use to a prop or staging element, as well as an artefact in its own right.

Radio Nurse and Guardian Ear, 1937, manufactured by Zenith Radio Corp. Photograph by Kevin Noble © INFGM / ARS – DACS

“He has always been concerned with the context”

The multiple uses of Akari lamps in the exhibition bear witness to one of Noguchi’s core beliefs, says Ostend. “He always cared about the context in art,” she explains. “In the Akari’s case, the object was only part of the ‘art’ – the other components were the room it illuminated and, of course, the people who saw it.”

But Noguchi was not a proponent of “art for the sake of art,” says Ostend. She compares his writings and research on purpose, sustainability and the environment, with which he was prolific, to that of a philosopher. In this way, she says he has more in common with artists and designers today than he perhaps ever did with his contemporaries.

“Even though it dates back decades, her work is still incredibly relevant to today’s designers and artists, who also want to make a difference with their practice,” she says. However, none of this is to say that he took himself or worked too seriously. As Ostend explains, Noguchi was a strong supporter of play, and his influential landscaping for children’s playgrounds is a reminder of this.

Noguchi tests Slide Mantra at “Isamu Noguchi: What is sculpture? », Venice Biennale 1986. Photograph by Michio Noguchi © INFGM / ARS – DACS

“Even in mass production, individuality is still possible”

The playgrounds, as well as the commercially produced Akari lamps, showcased Noguchi’s “commitment to accessible public art,” says Ostend. Akari lamps in particular, she says, were a way for the designer to “bring sculpture into everyday households.”

“In fact, he saw this form of ‘commercial’ design as a way to escape the art market and work with more freedom and less constraint,” says Ostende. “He believed in the idea that even in mass production, individuality is still possible.”

Beyond the Akari lights, many other models of Noguchi were also mass produced. Much of this work was produced alongside George Nelson, Paul László, and Charles Eames for the Herman Miller Company. The Noguchi table, for example, remains in production today.

Isamu Noguchi (design) with Shoji Sadao (architect), Play Equipment at Moerenuma Koen, 1988-2004. Sapporo, Japan. © INFGM / ARS – DACS

Noguchi will open at the Barbican Art Gallery on September 30 and run through January 9. For more information, including opening hours, visit the Barbacane site.


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The design of the exhibition by SITE https://expo-monet.com/the-design-of-the-exhibition-by-site/ https://expo-monet.com/the-design-of-the-exhibition-by-site/#respond Tue, 31 Aug 2021 13:00:19 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-design-of-the-exhibition-by-site/ The WilliWear Men’s Showroom, c. 1982. Photo: Andreas Sterzing “I don’t design clothes for the queen; but for the people who wave to her when she walks by, ”said fashion designer Willi Smith, who drew many of his best ideas from street life in New York City. His label, WilliWear, was the first streetwear brand, […]]]>

The WilliWear Men’s Showroom, c. 1982.
Photo: Andreas Sterzing

“I don’t design clothes for the queen; but for the people who wave to her when she walks by, ”said fashion designer Willi Smith, who drew many of his best ideas from street life in New York City. His label, WilliWear, was the first streetwear brand, and his clothes, released in the late 1970s, were modern, comfortable, and expressive – think oversized blazers and pants that all body types could wear, chunky knits and fabrics sourced from all over the world. (One of his most popular pieces was a one size fits all cargo pants with adjustable waistband.) Smith often sold models of his designs, so people could make his clothes at home. So, in the early 1980s, when he wanted to open his own showroom, he told James Wines, founder of the architecture and environmental art studio. TO PLACE, to make it “as far away from Ralph Lauren as possible”. Smith took Wines to his favorite haunts on the west side – Christopher St. Pier and nightclubs close – and as they walked around the area, he pointed out all of the materials and textures he loved. Wines thought: Let’s make the street.

Willi Smith (left) designed what he called “democratic” fashion. The streetscape-inspired showroom was a backdrop for the type of clothing he made (right). From left to right : Photo: Courtesy of Kim SteelePhoto: Peter Gould / Courtesy of Fashion Institute of Technology

Willi Smith (left) designed what he called “democratic” fashion. The streetscape-inspired showroom was a backdrop for the type of clothing he …
Willi Smith (left) designed what he called “democratic” fashion. The streetscape-inspired showroom was a backdrop for the type of clothing he made (right). From above: Photo: Courtesy of Kim SteelePhoto: Peter Gould / Courtesy of Fashion Institute of Technology

Under cover of night, Wines drove his Ford Explorer through the same areas Smith took him – which was being redeveloped and highway removal at a breakneck pace – and picked up all the trash he had. could find: rolls of chain link fencing, bricks, metal siding, shipping pallets and even stack cleats. The entirety of Smith’s office – which featured a huge desk that looked like two unfinished brick walls topped with glass – came from a single construction site. Every once in a while, they hit the jackpot: an overturned fire hydrant or a broken lamppost. “We were very careful not to affect public safety, but it was really like a game,” says Wines, whose job it is to abandon architectural conventions. “I like this idea of ​​the unwanted world, because you can do something with it.”

Set foot inside Smith Women’s Showroom, which opened on West 38th Street in 1982, was like stepping into an industrial downtown street, painted entirely in dark gray. The “Ghost cityscape”Was as much an artistic experience as a place to shop for clothes, as Smith intended, and paved the way for concept shops like Dover Street Market and Opening Ceremony. The stores belonged to the same universe for which the clothes were designed. He hung clothes directly on the chain link fences and posed mannequins sitting on concrete blocks, just like a person would on the street. When Smith held fashion shows in showrooms, models climbed fences, hung on pipes, and sat on fire hydrants. “It was an absolute genius to have designed, for the first major boutique of African-American fashion designers, an environmental framework that not only spoke to the designer’s creative vision for clothing, but also defined the man, the woman. politics and the social conditions of the time ”, the architect Jack Travis, writing. “The results were undeniable.

The WilliWear women’s showroom opened in 1982.
Photo: James Wines

So when Cooper Hewitt mounted a retrospective of Smith’s daring career in “Willi Smith: street sewing”, Which is open until October 24, there was no question of who would design the exhibition. It had to be SITE. Alexandra Cunningham Cameron, curator of the exhibition, said: “The SITE and WilliWear collaboration so perfectly represents two complementary value systems that collide to challenge the status quo, both transforming basic materials – a shovel, a skirt , a brick, a blazer – in an act of rebellion, a moment of becoming built by style and intelligence.

SITE traveled to the western part of Manhattan to find materials and inspiration for Smith’s showrooms. Here are some of the photos Wines took on his scouting trips in the 1980s. Photos: Courtesy of James Wines.

SITE traveled to the western part of Manhattan to find materials and inspiration for Smith’s showrooms. Here are some of the photos Wines took during her sc …
SITE traveled to the western part of Manhattan to find materials and inspiration for Smith’s showrooms. Here are some of the photos Wines took on his scouting trips in the 1980s. Photos: Courtesy of James Wines.

An exhibit on Willi Smith had to include his showroom in one way or another. But representing architecture in a gallery setting is always a challenge, as the experience of architecture requires a body in space. The photos, videos or models of a Smith showroom can go no further. So Wines, now 89, worked with Chermayeff Studio, production studio Supermatic, and his daughter Suzan’s wines, to recreate the most iconic elements of Smith’s showrooms and office – the collage of street artifacts, the masonry desk – in the gallery.

But for Wines, there was also an inherent tension in replicating this concept in the museum. “The whole environmental art movement in Soho in the ’70s and’ 80s, which I was a part of, was based on leaving galleries,” says Wines. “Our whole philosophy moved away from all these projectors, brackets, plinths and frames. We are all either in the landscape or in the street. (Some of SITE’s most famous works have been to transform big box retail stores into works of art which made the buildings appear to be collapsing or peeling off.) Plus, Cooper Hewitt is a Georgian mansion that once belonged to Andrew Carnegie. An iconic Upper East Side building is about as far removed as possible from Wines’ philosophy, which rejects architectural formalism, and the aesthetic of downtown Smith. Smith’s showrooms and office were set in large, raw industrial spaces with cement floors, exposed beams, and large windows. The gallery, meanwhile, has parquet floors, ornate carved moldings, coffered ceilings, and stained glass windows. “The idea of ​​exhibition space is a formalization of space,” says Wines. “It became this big problem of … How am I going to keep this in mind? How am I going to honor the artist?

Wines’ conceptual sketches for Cooper Hewitt’s exhibition on Willi Smith represented streetscapes in a state of dematerialization.
Illustration: Courtesy of James Wines

Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

Part of the appeal of the original exhibit hall was that the artifacts all existed in the city before they were assembled into a recreation of a downtown street. “In the 80s a lot of the energy was related to the harshness and the reality of the whole thing,” says Wines. “We tore up entire facades of buildings and were lucky enough to find all of these jagged buildings, so we had pretty much everything we needed to slip into the showroom and do this freewheeling collage. And Willi loved it, of course, and it was handy because you can hang clothes anywhere.

But SITE couldn’t attach anything to the museum’s wooden walls, or put artifacts directly on the floor, so they designed stand-alone exhibition platforms. In addition, the objects in the exhibition are now all precious. Ephemera like magazine articles, invitations to fashion shows and posters had to be placed in display cases to protect them. Wines was particularly shocked to learn that curators couldn’t always hang clothes directly on the exhibit structure, as Smith would have done in his shop. “How could touching pipes hurt a t-shirt?” »Notes on the wines. (Some of the Smith T-shirts once sold for $ 40 now go for $ 1,400.)

Wines designed a smaller version of Smith’s desk for the exhibit.
Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

SITE built Smith’s office in 1982 with materials salvaged from a Manhattan construction site.
Photo: James Wines

Wines also couldn’t surreptitiously source materials like they once did at midnight, as those abandoned buildings and demolished piles of materials no longer exist in the city. But Cat Garcia-Menocal, the construction manager at Supermatic, competed over materials from construction suppliers to get closer to what was in the original showroom. It was brand new, of course, not rough from years of wear and tear on the exterior. When it came time to recreate Smith’s site office, the designers scaled it down and used it to display some of his personal items, like his round plastic glasses.

Until the end, Wines wondered how the scenography of the exhibition would unfold. But when he was finally able to visit the exhibit in person (the museum reopened this summer after having to close for COVID just a week after the exhibit began), he was delighted to find that all Georgian adornments were ‘were faded into the background, as he’d hoped, and he felt as close to Smith’s world as he could be in 2021. I felt that, too. Walking from the wood-lined hallway of the museum and rounding the corner of the exhibit was exhilarating. He did not have the exact sense of reality that Wines described as having the original showrooms, but that’s understandable, and there was a feeling of awe. “It still looked like Willi Smith, there was still that sense of bonding,” Wines says. “We managed to do it, so it at least preserves the memory of the showroom.”

Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution

Photo: Matt Flynn / Smithsonian Institution


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Augusta’s First Amendment Museum secures exhibition design grants https://expo-monet.com/augustas-first-amendment-museum-secures-exhibition-design-grants/ https://expo-monet.com/augustas-first-amendment-museum-secures-exhibition-design-grants/#respond Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/augustas-first-amendment-museum-secures-exhibition-design-grants/ A render shows what the First Amendment Museum should look like once its renovation is complete. Image courtesy of the First Amendment Museum AUGUSTA – The First Amendment Museum, located in Guy P. Gannett’s former home in Augusta, won a grant of nearly $ 250,000 to complete the design of what officials say is his […]]]>

A render shows what the First Amendment Museum should look like once its renovation is complete. Image courtesy of the First Amendment Museum

AUGUSTA – The First Amendment Museum, located in Guy P. Gannett’s former home in Augusta, won a grant of nearly $ 250,000 to complete the design of what officials say is his cutting-edge exhibit intended to inspire visitors to understand, practice and preserve their First Amendment rights to religion, speech, press, assembly and petition.

The federal $ 249,000 Museums for America grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services will be used to complete the design of the museum’s exhibit, which is slated to be installed as part of a $ 14 million overall restoration and expansion of the building.

The planned interactive exhibit, officials said, will allow visitors to meet, interact with and reflect on their rights by reinforcing the notion that citizens use and engage with the freedoms protected by the First Amendment. Each room in the museum will interpret a particular aspect of the First Amendment. A dystopian kitchen will show what life could be like in a society without the First Amendment, a “Censorship Library” will highlight books, movies and music that have been banned, a teenage bedroom will explore the discourse of youth and social media, and an exercise The Room will “engage kinesthetic learners,” according to a press release.

“This major grant will help us create a unique, interactive and relevant visitor experience” Co-founder of Genie Gannett and Chairman of the Board, and a granddaughter of Guy Gannett, said in the statement.

The non-partisan the museum is already open, with temporary exhibitions and guided interactive tours focused on the First Amendment and the five freedoms it protects: religion, speech, press, meeting and petition. Admission is free and the museum, located at 184 State St. next to Blaine House, is open 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and, until September 4, Saturday.

Deborah Williams, director of outreach engagement for the First Amendment Museum, said on Monday that the exhibit will be worked on alongside the physical restoration and expansion of the 1911 building, which will likely begin next year with the aim of open the new exhibit at the end of 2023 or early 2024..

The exhibition will be created by the designer Helen Riegle of HER Design in Boston, whose portfolio includes “Dear Boston: Messages from the Marathon Memorial” from the Boston Public Library, “A Whole New Game” from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and “America on The Move” at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History.

“The museum exhibits will show how Americans have used their First Amendment rights as a tool to move our society forward and to create that ‘more perfect union’ which is our civic burden,” said Christian Cotz, Managing Director of the museum. “But perhaps more importantly, these dynamic, stimulating and interactive exhibits will inspire people to live their freedoms and exercise their rights more intentionally and effectively.”

A fundraising campaign to fund the project is in its early stages, according to Jamie O’Brien, Director of Development. Donations can be made through the museum’s website.

The expansion will double the size of the facility and will be attached to the rear of the building.

Guy Gannett and his family lived in the house for about 10 years before moving to Portland when the publishing company he founded with his father purchased the Portland Press Herald. The Gannett Publishing Co. also owned the Waterville Sentinel, the Portland (Maine) Sunday Telegram, the Portland Evening Express and the Daily Kennebec Journal. They later expanded to broadcast media, but sold the company in 1998.


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Mather & Cie | exhibition design partner for Inverness Castle https://expo-monet.com/mather-cie-exhibition-design-partner-for-inverness-castle/ https://expo-monet.com/mather-cie-exhibition-design-partner-for-inverness-castle/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/mather-cie-exhibition-design-partner-for-inverness-castle/ Mather & Cie, one of the leading consultants in tourist attractions and exhibition design, was announced by the Highland Council as the successful exhibition designer for the project to transform Inverness Castle into a world-class tourist attraction. Since its establishment in 1995, the company has worked on the design of many popular and successful exhibitions, […]]]>

Mather & Cie, one of the leading consultants in tourist attractions and exhibition design, was announced by the Highland Council as the successful exhibition designer for the project to transform Inverness Castle into a world-class tourist attraction.

Since its establishment in 1995, the company has worked on the design of many popular and successful exhibitions, tourist attractions, tours and museums around the world. With 25 years of experience in the industry, Mather & Co is able to come up with new and innovative ways to tell stories, engage visitors and attract new audiences.

Previous projects include Downton Abbey: the exhibition; The ultimate ride to the Silverstone experience; The experience of the Royal Mint; and the R&A World of Golf Museum in St Andrews.

Chris Mather, CEO, Mather & Co; Fiona Hampton, Director, Inverness Castle; Sarah Clarke, Managing Director, Mather & Co. inside the entrance to Inverness Castle. Image credit: Ewen Weatherspoon

Transform Inverness Castle

Mather & Co will bring this rich experience to the transformation of Inverness Castle and to the development of the “Spirit of the Highlands” project. Their approach will take into account the entire visitor experience, including what people see and interact with before, during and after their visit. The project will ensure that everyone who visits the castle has a memorable time and will want to visit it again in the future.

Celebrating and interpreting “the spirit of the highlands” in 100 stories will be the central theme of the visitor experience. The tender invited the successful company to develop and explore this theme in imaginative and unexpected ways, encouraging people to visit other places around the Highlands.

“The appointment of Mather & Co as exhibition designers for the project is an important step in the transformation of Inverness Castle”, states Fergus ewing MSP, co-chair of the Inverness Castle Delivery Group.

“Their vast experience across a diverse range of tourist attractions across the world will be a welcome contribution to the development of the castle as a gateway to Highland tourism, as well as a place that locals and visitors alike will have. looking forward to visiting again and again. “

Chris mather, CEO of Mather & Co, adds: “We are delighted to be part of the project team and start by creating a first class and compelling attraction – showcasing the rich heritage of the Highlands and Islands and the castle itself. -same “

Inverness Castle Project
Image credit LDN Architects srl

A world-class tourist attraction for the Highlands

High Life Highland is the managing agent of the Highland Council in the project to transform Inverness Castle into a tourist attraction for the Highlands. The transformation of Inverness Castle is supported by an investment of £ 15million from the Scottish government and £ 3million from the UK government as part of the Inverness and Highlands area agreement.

The project aims to create a gateway for Highland tourism, helping to revitalize tourism across the region and provide investment to the industry as it recovers from the pandemic. It will support economic growth throughout the Highland region, creating a long-lasting must-see attraction celebrating the spirit of the Highlands.

The Inverness and Highland City Region Agreement is a joint initiative supported by an investment of up to £ 315million from the UK and Scottish governments, the Highland Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the University of the Highlands and Islands, aimed at to stimulate sustainable regional economic growth.

Mather & Co is a experienced multidisciplinary design consultancy based in Chesire, UK. It offers a flexible and adaptable service, adapted to the needs of each client.

Top image credits LDN Architects srl


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Dubai Festival City Mall Launches Exclusive Art Exhibition https://expo-monet.com/dubai-festival-city-mall-launches-exclusive-art-exhibition/ https://expo-monet.com/dubai-festival-city-mall-launches-exclusive-art-exhibition/#respond Mon, 26 Apr 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/dubai-festival-city-mall-launches-exclusive-art-exhibition/ To celebrate the holy month, the Dubai Festival City Mall offers a unique and one-of-a-kind art exhibition to its visitors throughout Ramadan. The 15 art displays will feature the 99 names of Allah in a beautiful display located at various locations around the mall. In addition, the first 100 visitors to the exhibition will receive […]]]>

To celebrate the holy month, the Dubai Festival City Mall offers a unique and one-of-a-kind art exhibition to its visitors throughout Ramadan. The 15 art displays will feature the 99 names of Allah in a beautiful display located at various locations around the mall. In addition, the first 100 visitors to the exhibition will receive a collector’s art book each day to take home to extend the experience.

The mall will also host a live painting demonstration where a specially selected artist will produce exceptional artwork to create a mural on a space on the first floor of the mall. Customers can attend the show on weekdays from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. and on weekends from 5 to 11 p.m.

In keeping with the Ramadan tradition of helping others, the Dubai Festival City Mall will give back to its customers and the Al Jalila Foundation throughout the holy month. Customers who spend 200 AED at any of the restaurants and cafes at Dubai Festival City Mall will have the chance to play the memory game on the Festival Rewards app and win a Festival City Mall gift card worth 50 AED. For anyone playing the special game hosted on the app, the Dubai Festival City Mall will donate AED 10 to the Al Jalila Foundation.


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Dubai Design District launches week-long Rethink Art exhibition https://expo-monet.com/dubai-design-district-launches-week-long-rethink-art-exhibition/ https://expo-monet.com/dubai-design-district-launches-week-long-rethink-art-exhibition/#respond Sun, 28 Mar 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/dubai-design-district-launches-week-long-rethink-art-exhibition/ Dubai Design District (d3) has announced a new global campaign for the post-pandemic world: Rethink the Regular. To rebuild and revitalize communities, promote growth and boost the UAE’s knowledge and innovation-based economy, the campaign encourages the world’s brightest minds to come together and see design in a new light. . The international initiative will promote […]]]>

Dubai Design District (d3) has announced a new global campaign for the post-pandemic world: Rethink the Regular.

To rebuild and revitalize communities, promote growth and boost the UAE’s knowledge and innovation-based economy, the campaign encourages the world’s brightest minds to come together and see design in a new light. .

The international initiative will promote Dubai as a global destination for the creative industries that provides opportunities for students, startups, entrepreneurs and multinational companies.

To begin with, d3 today launched a week-long Rethink Art exhibition. His Highness Sheikh Zayed’s official Range Rover, an original Dodge Challenger from The Dukes of Hazzard, and a 1962 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud are among 15 classic cars that raced through the business district for the event, March 28. until April 3, 2021.

Eye-catching installations, art exhibitions, fashion pop-ups and mouth-watering special menus celebrating global cuisine will also be available to the community and the general public, with a series of free workshops from Tashkeel, the multidisciplinary art. Dubai based and design organization, also ongoing. Three restaurants – Emirati restaurant Smat, Italian street food destination Vicolo, and wellness-inspired cafe Anamoia – have created special discounted menus for Rethink Art.

The week-long event encouraging people to see design from a new perspective aims to celebrate the diversity of talent in the region’s largest creative hub. It comes after contemporary American street artist Shepard Fairey – the man behind Barack Obama’s iconic “Hope” poster – unveiled two new murals in d3, further strengthening Dubai’s position as a global destination for art and design.

Khadija Al Bastaki, executive director of d3, said: “Since its inception in 2013, d3 has been the premier destination for creativity in the region. As the world continues to face unprecedented change, it is important to stay ahead of the curve – by rethinking what has been done before, we will be able to conceptualize and build stronger economies that can withstand the test of time. It will help Dubai to become one of the best cities in the world. Design plays an essential role in this new vision because it transcends all borders, it holds the key to innovation and humanizes technology. Through our Rethink the Regular campaign, we aim to inspire people and businesses to create new ideas and concepts in Dubai that move the world forward. We are delighted to launch this global campaign with our inaugural exhibition celebrating the diversity of d3 talent by bringing new artistic and culinary experiences to Dubai that reflect our rich heritage and pioneering vision for the future.


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Design in 2021 – what will exhibition design look like? https://expo-monet.com/design-in-2021-what-will-exhibition-design-look-like/ https://expo-monet.com/design-in-2021-what-will-exhibition-design-look-like/#respond Tue, 05 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/design-in-2021-what-will-exhibition-design-look-like/ Through Molly long January 5, 2021 12h53 January 15, 2021 9:02 What do you think 2021 will hold for exhibition design? What a roller coaster year 2020 for exhibition design! With many museums closed for much of the year and needing to put staff on leave, many short and long term projects have postponed openings. […]]]>

What do you think 2021 will hold for exhibition design?

What a roller coaster year 2020 for exhibition design! With many museums closed for much of the year and needing to put staff on leave, many short and long term projects have postponed openings. As a result, many institutions and design agencies have taken the time to completely rethink the future – and on many levels. The pandemic has impacted in so many different ways, from budgets and deadlines to new sensitivities and perspectives and the more practical issues of visitor travel, including the implications of touch and the importance of travel lanes.

As we move forward now, I think the appetite for exhibitions will follow different paths. On the one hand, we’ll see some really exciting installations that come and go in a flash. Inexpensive exhibitions to set up and embodying creative and free-thinking solutions, making maximum use of light and the audiovisual sector.

On the other hand, we will see beautifully designed, clean, and material-rich displays that are highly regarded. I think the exhibits will become immensely popular as we come out of the pandemic. I predict an explosion of creativity too. People are so hungry for exciting ‘real’ things that embody value and craftsmanship, as well as new and empowering designs, especially after the lack of experiential 3D cultivation in our home-confined, life-based existence. the screen of recent times. I also believe that there will be a significantly increased engagement in exhibition design for sustainable materials and more flexible, modular and reusable designs.

I can’t wait to see what will happen in 2021.

What is your favorite example of exhibition design from 2020 and why?

The year was thus divided between the pre-containment exposures in January and February and what followed.

Earlier this year, I just managed to see a big exhibition called Sense Me at the Trapholt Museum of Modern Art in Kolding, Denmark. It was a wonderful sensory journey, with textured curtains in which you could walk around and experience effects; a responsive digital box that you can walk in and create moving images and a room full of curved wooden trees that emit sounds with a disorienting and distorting mirror, as well as a cloud that you can gaze into at the top of a ladder (photo above). It was a brilliant and immersive experience that seemed all the more impressive as nothing like it was possible for the rest of the year and beyond.

We are currently designing an exhibition on touch at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, which opens this month and whose subject matter will have an entirely different resonance after Covid, which was completely unforeseen during the conception of the exhibition.


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The five biggest exhibition design stories of 2020 https://expo-monet.com/the-five-biggest-exhibition-design-stories-of-2020/ https://expo-monet.com/the-five-biggest-exhibition-design-stories-of-2020/#respond Fri, 18 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-five-biggest-exhibition-design-stories-of-2020/ In a year when many cultural institutions were closed, exhibition designers had to adapt and often bring the museum experience into our own homes. Through Henri wong December 18, 2020 11:27 a.m. December 18, 2020 12:58 Non-Pavilion, a VR installation at the V&A for last year’s London Design Festival How would the hard-hit exhibition industry […]]]>

In a year when many cultural institutions were closed, exhibition designers had to adapt and often bring the museum experience into our own homes.

Non-Pavilion, a VR installation at the V&A for last year’s London Design Festival

How would the hard-hit exhibition industry return after the first lockdown? The Design Museum’s flagship exhibit, Electronic: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers, was set up before the lockdown and its organizers revealed to Design Week how it was adjusted accordingly. In addition to the obligatory masks and hand sanitizer stations, the capacity of the bikes had been doubled so that people did not have to take public transport and the capacity was cut in half (the museum had to open late to fill a lack of ticket sales).

Beyond the immediate changes, we wondered how exhibition design could evolve in the long term. Nissen Richards studio director Pippa Nissen told Design Week Covid could start a ‘digital revolution’ in exhibition spaces with the rise of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR). She also noted that there might be a shift towards an (even more) more organized experience, driven by how people might experience confined spaces differently. Future exhibits could be about “experiencing someone’s pre-designed experience” with less choice on the part of the visitor.

Materials would be another focus. “We can’t waste so much anymore,” Nissen said. Not only should the materials be more durable, but they should be more adaptable (to change social distancing rules and future plans). It was a trend echoed at Milan’s Salone Del Mobile – which we attended the preview just before the lockdown and its possible postponement – where the focus was on reusable exhibition displays.


The Chemical Brothers experiment, designed by Smith & Lyall

When it finally opened, Design Week saw a relatively quiet preview of the Design Museum’s successful exhibition on the history of electronic music. A transfer from Paris, Electronic: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers took turn-of-the-century visitors and ‘mad sound scientists’ to the Chicago house scene and also to Manchester where the graphic work of Ben Kelly and Peter Saville for the Haçienda club is displayed.

Perhaps most striking in the exhibit was the three lights and sounds installation which would have been particularly well received by all visitors missing the city’s closed club scene. Kraftwerk’s 3D experience was akin to a high-level music video, displaying music from the band’s eight albums. Architecture 1024’s large-scale moving light display was set to the soundtrack of French DJ Laurent Garnier.

The final room belonged to Got to Keep On, a 2019 play by the Chemical Brothers and showmakers Smith & Lyall. The room featured strobe light and smoke effects and shape-shifting 3D visuals. It summed up what Smith & Lyall called the “transformative power of music, art and design”.


Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum

As in many sectors, museums and galleries have focused this year on digital. When people couldn’t go out, the best way to reach them was at home. In the spring, the British Museum launched what it called one of the “most comprehensive online museum collections databases” in the world. Some 4 million objects have been made available for viewing online. The curation, however, has not been abolished. Themes were launched in conjunction with the exhibits, such as Love and Identity, which sought to provide an organized experience for people, told us Michael Tame, head of the museum’s digital program.

Across the industry, efforts have been made to improve online accessibility during the lockdown. For example, the Royal Academy has created a 38-minute online tour of its Picasso and Paper exhibition. It wasn’t unprecedented – Google once helped institutions like the National Gallery in London and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to create virtual tours – but there was now a bigger push.

AR Acute Art Platform – interviewed by Design Week at the start of the year – has also expanded its offer with a new application that puts the user in the position of exhibition curator. Designed in-house, the app uses phone cameras to place facilities in people’s homes. He was accompanied by a few renowned collaborators: Jeff Koons, Marina Abramovic and Ai Weiwei.


Paramount by Konstantin Grcic for Toy Poodle. Photo: Hiroshi Yoda.

Man’s best friend was the focus of a design-led exhibition at Japan House in London this summer. “The human engineering approach is a vision of creating the environment that uses the human body as a criterion,” explained Hara Kenya, chief creative advisor at Japan House. “However, look at a small dog next to its owner and you begin to see the potential for a new type of architecture.”

16 architects and designers from around the world produced work for the playful exhibition, attracting Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Among the collection of beds, toys and activities was a poodle-specific piece by German industrial designer Konstantin Grcic. Paramount was a mirrored structure that aimed to appeal to the breed known to love its own reflection.

Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima was inspired by the characteristics of his subject himself. Mimicking the fluffy coat of the Bichon Frize, he created a “cotton candy cocoon” where the breed could relax in comfort and style.


The V&A Alice in Wonderland exhibit was scheduled to open this summer. When the exhibit was postponed until next year, the museum turned to London-based game studio Preloaded to create VR sets for those who wish to visit the fantastic world of Lewis Carroll.

While the original plan was to have a 4-minute experience at the exhibit itself, that ambition grew during lockdown to become a home-based virtual reality experience. The studio also developed a centerpiece for the exhibition preview in October. The experience took people to the Queen of Hearts Garden and the Hall of Doors, incorporating visual tricks – such as the change of scale – throughout. The world consisted of vivid hand-drawn visuals, with illustrations by Icelandic artist Kristjana S. Williams.

Virtual reality opens up possibilities for the exhibition experience, Preloaded associate creative director Jon Caplin told us. “Not being held back by the physical world means you can completely change the environment, in color and scale,” he added, while noting that it could be experienced in the comfort of people’s bedrooms. . In an age of social distancing, this could be a useful avenue for museums and galleries to explore – although that of course means investing in a VR headset, added Caplin.


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