Exhibition design – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 12:36:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://expo-monet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-63-120x120.png Exhibition design – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ 32 32 Design, Climate Action: regenerative exhibition design https://expo-monet.com/design-climate-action-regenerative-exhibition-design/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 12:36:55 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/design-climate-action-regenerative-exhibition-design/ How exhibition designers, institutions and specialist industry bodies can work together to embrace the principles of regeneration in the gallery and museum sector. The UK’s first sector-by-sector report by Julie’s Bicycle and BOP Consulting, a sustainability-focused non-profit organization commissioned by the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre, highlights the fact that, unlike many sub- creative […]]]>

How exhibition designers, institutions and specialist industry bodies can work together to embrace the principles of regeneration in the gallery and museum sector.

The UK’s first sector-by-sector report by Julie’s Bicycle and BOP Consulting, a sustainability-focused non-profit organization commissioned by the Creative Industries Policy and Evidence Centre, highlights the fact that, unlike many sub- creative sectors, British galleries no longer have a dedicated industry. organization to “develop programs to educate its members and encourage change”.

Yet, with the relatively short lifespan and frequent turnover of exhibits, there are significant opportunities to use design to reduce the environmental impact of the sector.

“How do you make long-lasting exhibits in the first place?”

Andrew Lock, associate director of museum and exhibition design studio Event Communications, explains that “there is already a huge amount of thinking about embodied carbon and carbon in use” coming from the exhibit industry. architecture.

He describes it as a “road traveled” but adds “how often does this happen in exhibitions? […] it has to reverberate more, in my opinion.”

He emphasizes the importance of reallocating and conserving materials: “We’re talking about checking what [a museum or gallery] he has,” while for new materials, he says, “how can you design for them to be recycled in the first place? You know, don’t use glue, don’t use laminate, use materials where materials can be broken down into components.

Event’s modular displays for the Burrell Collection, Glasgow allow for flexibility and reconfiguration. Image: Glasgow Life

However, Lock suggests that the circular mindset should extend beyond the exhibit materials themselves.

“You can rent light, you can rent elevators, you can rent escalators, you can rent audiovisual equipment, you can rent a whole bunch of things you weren’t used to doing. For example, you can contract with Phillips to provide a certain level of lux for many years,” he says.

This then means, he adds, “that the company must be responsible for what it does with the [products] afterwards; it is an incentive for them to do good things that last for a long time.

The energy used, meanwhile, can be reduced by taking a more thoughtful object-by-object approach when designing an exhibit, he says. “In what conditions must they be? Should the same conditions be provided for each of these objects? Should we air-condition the whole of this exhibition space or can we simply condition the showcases of each object.

“The same goes for lighting,” he adds. “How can you light these things naturally, are there things you would naturally light up, and can you avoid light fixtures?”

Tensions in Designing Sustainable Exhibits

Lock concedes that every project has a different motivation, and sometimes desired aesthetics can conflict with achieving sustainability. Particularly in the brand experience area of ​​Event’s work, “where people want shiny things that tend not to be very durable,” he says.

“The aesthetic that we currently expect, or that customers expect, or that consumers expect is not compatible with a palette of sustainable materials, arguably.”

“It’s quite a change as a designer to say I’m not using this material when it’s the perfect material to achieve this effect because it’s not durable,” he adds.

Material samples for Waste Age. Image: Material Cultures

For Material Cultures, the practice behind the 3D design of the Design Museum‘s Waste Age exhibit, there’s a case for making an exhibit’s sustainability visible. Co-director George Massoud explains: “Our approach is always to celebrate the materials that are used and that they are integral to the narrative of the show.

He says Material Cultures works with bio-based materials, but other defined parameters for the era of waste included “proximity to site and understanding where raw materials come from and how and where they are processed.”

Now that the exhibition is to travel to the gallery of the Hong Kong Design Institute, the change of location required a new phase of research to understand the local conditions. For the HKDI show, although many materials may remain the same, “we will use bamboo, because bamboo is available nearby.”

Interior of the Waste Age exhibit. Image: Oskar Proctor

Meanwhile, for London’s upcoming Building Center exhibition, Homegrown: Building a Post-carbon Future, Material Cultures will showcase prefabricated sustainable building techniques – through the unlikely move of putting a thatched pavilion in an exhibition at the center of London. ‘a town .

However, Massoud acknowledges that “because of the type of work we do […] there was never this conflict of whether we hide or expose the material,” but he also argues, “there are ways to expose the material without exposing it. There are ways to incorporate durable materials without having very textured walls.”

“The customer holds the cards”


While Massoud and Lock both point out that architects and designers working in the sector can take on more responsibility, both believe that clients must also do their part.

“We are just a service industry. You do what the customer ultimately asks you to do because they have the cards in hand,” says Lock, adding, “But how can we be ambassadors for sustainability?

Massoud comments, “Due to the nature of the setup of many of these teams and the hierarchy involved, I think a lot of it has to come from the customer side.”

“I find it interesting that even though the market and people – certainly in museums – tend to be very responsible and very aware of all these issues, somehow it’s not written enough in memories to make it all sustainable in the first place,” comments Lock.

Low-power LED lighting and audiovisual equipment tested for the event for the Riverside Museum of Transport

Massoud suggests that this may need to be a defined role within a project or institution, so that the afterlife of materials, for example, is written into the design strategy. Reflecting on Waste Age, he says, “Our scope didn’t include that, and neither did the project manager scope, or the museum scope and that’s not great, because everyone starts to think, ‘OK, well I tried and it didn’t work’. Whereas if you have been appointed to do this job, then you know you have to deliver”.

Plans in action

Urge, who worked on Waste Age with Material Cultures and 2D designers Spin studio, and created an audit of the exhibit’s carbon impact, continues to work with the Design Museum on tips to improve the sustainability of its exhibits. in the future.

At the V&A, meanwhile, a sustainability plan was put in place in 2020-2021 by the then sustainability manager, Sara Kassam, which focused on reuse, waste design, adding sustainability criteria to specifications and tenders, as well as a “sustainability-focused learning program” that aimed “to support and empower employees”, with most sessions open to all employees and volunteers.”We wanted to encourage people to see the course as part of their professional development,” says Suzanne Goode, V&A Learning and Development Manager.

Despite the lack of an industry-wide body, however, one organization that works with many galleries to reduce the sector’s environmental impact is the Gallery Climate Coalition. It shares best practices and provides leadership on specific issues, striving to “harness the collective power of our members to achieve systemic change,” says the GCC.

Aoife Fannin, GCC project coordinator, explains that the first step in GCC’s decarbonization action plan for its members is the formation of a “green team”.

“We have found this to be an essential step in creating a strong culture of climate awareness within an organization and in standardizing environmental considerations at all stages of decision-making,” she says.

A number of specific campaigns target areas such as promoting a transition to “environmentally friendly freight operations”, by “calling on all actors and operators in the supply chain to take responsibility and bring about effective change”.

She also highlights a “peer-to-peer resource sharing tool” Barder.art, which the GCC is currently working with and explains that in the arts sector “About 90-94% of emissions are made up of shipping, energy and travel – moving works of art, people and powering the buildings that house them”.

Numbers or storytelling?

“Beyond that, we advise all members to complete an annual carbon footprint using our free carbon calculator,” says Fannin.

“In order to set a 50% reduction target for 2030 (which all GCC members agree to upon registration), we need a starting point. This is why we ask members to calculate a baseline carbon footprint for a pre-covid year.

“GCC members make carbon reporting an annual task, similar to tax filings or keeping general financial records,” she says.

Beyond measurement, however, Lock and Massoud suggested that a particular opportunity for impact lies in the narrative nature of exhibits – their power to influence change, in conversation with their audience.

“We absolutely, 100% know that we’re screwing the world up, but we’re not doing anything about it. And it’s really interesting, this whole disconnect,” Lock says.

With the arts and exhibitions in particular, he says, “it’s their power. It’s about telling strong stories.” It highlights an exhibition at the Maritime Museum in Greenwich, London. “They did Canaletto, but they frame it in the context of rising sea levels in Venice,” he explains.

“Can you do an effective exposure that will change the way people behave? This exposure is power,” says Lock.

Banner Image: Interior of the Waste Age exhibit. Image: Oskar Proctor

]]>
National Museum of the Royal Navy invites tender for exhibition design https://expo-monet.com/national-museum-of-the-royal-navy-invites-tender-for-exhibition-design/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 15:53:09 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/national-museum-of-the-royal-navy-invites-tender-for-exhibition-design/ The exhibition will celebrate the famous voyage of HMS Challenger in the 19th century and highlight the scientific endeavors of the Royal Navy. By Bamford Abbey November 10, 2022 3:53 p.m. November 10, 2022 4:49 p.m. The National Museum of the Royal Navy (NMRN) has launched a tender for the design of a temporary exhibition […]]]>

The exhibition will celebrate the famous voyage of HMS Challenger in the 19th century and highlight the scientific endeavors of the Royal Navy.

The National Museum of the Royal Navy (NMRN) has launched a tender for the design of a temporary exhibition at its Portsmouth site, as well as a smaller-scale exhibition at its Hartlepool site.

The main focus of the exhibition will be to showcase interactive objects and elements based on the famous voyage of HMS Challenger from 1872 to 1876, with related content displayed at NMRN Hartlepool.

The crew of HMS Challenger. Credit: NMRN

It was the first oceanographic expedition organized specifically to collect data on a wide range of ocean features, from seawater chemistry and currents to marine life and seafloor geology. While being colorful and engaging, the display should also highlight the Royal Navy’s commitment to ‘science at sea’, in the context of the Challenger heritage, as required by the specification.

Although the smaller Hartlepool exhibit will fall under the same main theme – The World Under the Waves – it will focus more on the story of the circumnavigation of HMS Trincomalee. HMS Trincomalee is still afloat and open to visitors on site.

HMS Trincomalee and its historic surroundings at Hartlepool. Credit: NMRN

Five key themes – discoveries, technology, human stories, environmental heritage and concerns, and practices – should be considered during the design phase and reflected in the final result. Key outcomes of the project will include the temporary exhibition at the Portsmouth site, provisions for schools/learning legacy packages and provisions for programming activities that will engage young people, especially women and girls to pursue careers in STEM.

There should also be examples of audio-visual material and innovative digital and physical interactive content and permanent digital content for the NMRN website.

The purpose of the exhibition is to commemorate the historic voyage of HMS Challenger and its contributions to oceanographic science while highlighting the modern role of the Royal Navy in supporting science at sea and mapping the seabed. It should also seek to encourage visitors to learn more about Royal Navy exploration and scientific careers.

Explaining how the ocean is essential to understanding our changing planet is another key objective. Parts of the exhibition are expected to showcase the Royal Navy’s current climate science work and the results of recent climate change research.

Inside the HMS Hear My Story Galleries – an existing exhibit at the National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. Credit: NMRN

The exhibition tender will include Phase 1 (Design) and Phase 2 (Management), with a break between them. The NMRN has budgeted £28,000 for Phase 1, which covers RIBA Stages 1-4 (Preparation and Briefing, Design, Spatial Coordination and Technical Design).

The final budget estimate for the completion of the project – including manufacturing – must not exceed £195,000. The Hartlepool NMRN should be part of any full cost proposal.

The space proposed for the exhibition is a 120 m² space in the museum’s Storehouse 10 Galleries, which is located in a renovated 18th century warehouse. It includes six Kub2 walls that can be reconfigured to alter the display area and direct the flow of visitors, fixed wall panels around the edge of the space, seven Evolution demountable display cases that can be reconfigured in a variety of combinations, Vista enclosures and a Concord Muse track-mounted spotlight. lighting system.

The deadline for submitting applications is November 25, 2022 at noon. The chosen studio can expect the contract to start on December 9, 2022 and end on July 31, 2023.

The proposed opening date for the exhibition is June 24, 2023, after which it will run for one year.

Find more details on the brief and how to apply.

]]>
Milwaukee Public Museum Surveys Public for Exhibit Design in New Museum | WUWM 89.7 FM https://expo-monet.com/milwaukee-public-museum-surveys-public-for-exhibit-design-in-new-museum-wuwm-89-7-fm/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 16:04:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/milwaukee-public-museum-surveys-public-for-exhibit-design-in-new-museum-wuwm-89-7-fm/ In July, the Milwaukee Public Museum unveiled a first look at the exterior of the future museum. Now museum staff and design teams are entering the next design phase using feedback from a public survey. The Milwaukee Public Museum is moving to a new location as the condition of its current building deteriorates. The future […]]]>

In July, the Milwaukee Public Museum unveiled a first look at the exterior of the future museum. Now museum staff and design teams are entering the next design phase using feedback from a public survey.

The Milwaukee Public Museum is moving to a new location as the condition of its current building deteriorates. The future Milwaukee Museum of Natural History features a cream-colored city exterior inspired by the rock formations of Mill Bluff State Park. Today, as the museum enters its interior design phase, museum staff and designers are gathering feedback from the public.

Rebecca Ehlers is the museum’s vice president of marketing, communications and visitor experiences. Ehlers says the museum won’t assume what the public wants.

“As the years go by of these conversations, we’re starting to dig deeper and deeper into what that contribution might look like in terms of exhibits.”

“What are people looking for and what changes do they want to see,” adds Ehlers. “What familiar aspects of the museum do they want to highlight and how do we incorporate all of that? Is this really the right balance? »

She says the museum partnered with an exhibit design firm called Thinc Design to choose 10 questions for the survey. The survey asks people what kinds of community activities they would like to experience and what places in Wisconsin do they like to share with others. Ehlers says the teams creating the new museum researched other museums across the country.

“We have that knowledge, but we also have a history of innovation in our design. We actually have a style unique to Milwaukee in our current museum called the Milwaukee Style. We hope to innovate in this museum as well.”

According to UW-Milwaukee’s Encyclopedia of Milwaukee, Milwaukee style is a more realistic mode of museum display depicting taxidermied animals in their natural habitats. It was created by Carl Akeley, who worked at the Milwaukee Public Museum from 1886 to 1894. He is known as the “father of modern taxidermy” and created the first known habitat diorama.

Ehlers says people sometimes question the use of technology in new museums.

“It’s not going to be a museum of touchscreens; we’re going to use technology and really elegant ways to enhance the experience. It could be sound, it could be lighting, and so technology can look like a lot of different things. . ” said Ehlers.

The museum received over 4,400 survey responses from people in over 400 zip codes. The survey closes Friday, October 14.

You can take the survey by visiting the Milwaukee Public Museum website.

]]>
V&A blasts K-culture in new exhibit https://expo-monet.com/va-blasts-k-culture-in-new-exhibit/ Thu, 29 Sep 2022 11:37:12 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/va-blasts-k-culture-in-new-exhibit/ The design of Hallyu! the korean wave frames the energy of south korean culture that is currently sweeping the globe in the spaces that shaped it. The new Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) exhibition Hallyu! Korean Wave opens with the frenzied energy of K culture – loud, vibrant, constantly in motion – its title displayed […]]]>

The design of Hallyu! the korean wave frames the energy of south korean culture that is currently sweeping the globe in the spaces that shaped it.

The new Victoria & Albert Museum (V&A) exhibition Hallyu! Korean Wave opens with the frenzied energy of K culture – loud, vibrant, constantly in motion – its title displayed on multiple screens amid spinning clips from PSY’s 2012 viral hit Gangnam Style.

Curated by Rosalie Kim and Yoojin Choi, it is the first major exhibition to study South Korean culture which has recently swept the world and, as Rosalie Kim explains, “it has transformed the image of the country devastated by the Korean War to that of a leading cultural power.

This encompasses the rise of K-drama to recent hits such as Boon Joon-ho’s Oscar-winning Parasite, as well as global K-Pop idol phenomena such as BTS, G-Dragon, and aespa.

But in an exhibition designed by Berlin-based Korean graphic designer Na Kim as creative lead and Liverpool-based Studio Mutt as 3D designers, Hallyu’s global explosion is also framed more broadly.

Entrance to the exhibition at Hallyu! the korean wave

Invited to apply for the role of creative lead by the V&A, Na Kim was intrigued to tackle this now global phenomenon with which, as a Korean national, she has a “love/hate relationship”.

To understand Hallyu, it was necessary to go back to the wider Korean culture, but on the other hand, she explains, how K culture took off beyond the borders of South Korea. This cultural mobility is itself part of what makes Hallyu unique, where new ideas can “flow or happen”. [through] pop culture [or] a contemporary scene,” she says.

Shaped by the social spaces of Korean life

It was important for Na Kim to root Hallyu in South Korean culture.

Signage gives a strong visual presence to Hangul, the Korean alphabet, through bilingual headings that place Hangul characters side-by-side with Roman lettering, using similar font weight and width in both languages.

During this time, Kim also sought to express the energy of K culture by collaborating with a number of other Korean designers, including space designer San Jeon, graphic designer Yejoo Lee, and illustrator Joonho Ko.
However, the core of the exhibition proposal was to shape the exhibition through two contrasting settings familiar to Korean life: the public square and a private hall.

Installation image featuring the recreation of the Parasite bathroom scene in Hallyu! the korean wave

Na Kim discusses how these spaces were key to the political and social milieu from which K-wave evolved. Events such as the Asian financial crisis of the late 1990s brought people together in public, while in contrast, the more intimate space of a room is not only part of the traditional Korean home, but is also characteristic of the specific public space of the South Korean internet. -precursor to coffee, the PC Bang, now more commonly used for multiplayer computer games.

A focus on form

In a design that streamlines materials by focusing instead on form, both public plaza and private room environments were realized through 3D design by Studio Mutt, in collaboration with contractors Made Studio. The design of the lighting by Studio ZNA contributes to creating these two atmospheres thanks to the temperature and the power of the lighting.

The concept feels strongest in the section on K-drama and cinema, designed to look like a streetscape set.

“We created this street scene where we could use buildings [to hold] museum cabinets, but also in some cases we used the building to represent a physical building that you can walk into,” says Alexander Turner, director of Studio Mutt.

On entering a “building”, visitors are dropped off – almost too close for their comfort – in

Installation image with handmade fan banners and interactive screen by LG Display

a ‘one-on-one’ projection of a fight scene from Park Chan-wook’s 2003 film Oldboy, the wide, shallow dimensions of the space perfectly reflecting the camera shot.

The many moving parts of K-culture

To accommodate Hallyu’s broad remit, the exhibition is divided into separate sections. After the introduction From Rubble to Smartphones comes Spotlighting K-drama and Cinema, Sounding K-pop and Fandoms and Making K-Beauty and Fashion.

Each space is saturated with a single color on its various surfaces, clearly distinguishing each section. The specific colors were chosen by Na Kim for their relevance to aspects of Hallyu, such as a blue-purple associated with the BTS group, which would be instantly recognizable by his fans.

The design is flexible: darker moods are established for the Korean history section, [which moves swiftly from the Josean Dynasty to the 1950 Korean war and the rebuilding of the country afterwards, and a restrained elegance is used for the section on the world-leading industry of K-beauty, which spans from the 13th century cosmetics boxes to the futuristic machinery to IOPE and Lincsolution’s 3D printed custom face masks. Against white walls, Joonho Ko’s silhouetted illustrations depict historical beauty products.

Installation image featuring K-pop music videos and costumes, Hallyu! The Korean Wave

In contrast, the K-pop section features both intimate and open spaces. The walls of one room, featuring handmade fan banners, are lined with large cardboard tubes as if surrounding visitors with a giant curtain, while the next room is a riot of K-pop’s vibrant aesthetics, bordered instead with screens displaying K-pop music videos surrounding the exuberant stage costumes worn by the idols.

From hand-made fan banners to hi-tech collaborations

This section also showcases two examples of new technology. The first is a large transparent screen from LG Display which displays different K-pop lyrics.

Making use of its transparency, Turner explains, “we located [it] in a way that created a sort of enfilade […] a series of frames that lead you through the exhibition.

Behind it was another collaboration, an interactive Google Arts and Culture dance piece where visitors can record themselves performing K-pop dance routines.

The soft power of culture

Overall, the exhibition showcases the enormous variety and hybridity of K-wave, juxtaposing historical objects from the V&A’s leading collection of Korean crafts and design with innovations from the past decades.

There are design highlights throughout; these could include installing glow sticks, a handheld light wand unique to each K-pop idol and waved in unison by fans at concerts; or the webtoon comics of the 1990s, both a Korean design innovation that adapted cartoons for vertical reading by scrolling on a mobile phone, and a cultural product that bore witness to the tumultuous period of the Asian financial crisis, and which provides still sources material for K-drama, cinema, musicals and video games to this day.

Installation of K-pop glow sticks at Hallyu! the korean wave

One of the strengths of the design is a flexibility that allows for this variety, moving from sensitive historical content, through fine art to pop culture. The history section alone features exhibits as diverse as propaganda leaflets, a Seoul Olympics poster, early smartphones and car models to the 33 TV screens of Mirage Stage – the 1986 work of the ” father of video art” Nam June Paik. It also shows the unexpected origins of the cosmetics industry from LG – the electronics company that is one of the exhibit’s supporters.

Turner explains how Studio Mutt tried to play with this mix of formality and informality, something spelled out from the start in the V&A brief.

The exhibit is likely to appeal to design fans, K-pop fans, and everyone in between. Its design allows viral hits to be shown alongside lesser-known highlights, while its singular yet expansive concept shows how much can come together in one particular place to explosive effect.

The Hallyu! The Korean Wave runs from 24 September 2022 to 25 June 2023 at the Victoria & Albert Museum, Cromwell Road, London, SW7 2RL

Banner Image: Installation Image, Hallyu! The Korean Wave at the V&A

]]>
Foster, car show exhibit design at the Guggenheim Bilbao https://expo-monet.com/foster-car-show-exhibit-design-at-the-guggenheim-bilbao/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 10:13:21 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/foster-car-show-exhibit-design-at-the-guggenheim-bilbao/ Quite unusual to see Lord Norman Foster as curator. It takes place at the Guggenheim in Bilbao, where the great architect designs the exhibition Movement. Cars. Art. Architecture.an event that celebrates the artistic dimension of the automobile and links it to the parallel worlds of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and cinema, highlighting the multiple stylistic […]]]>

Quite unusual to see Lord Norman Foster as curator. It takes place at the Guggenheim in Bilbao, where the great architect designs the exhibition Movement. Cars. Art. Architecture.an event that celebrates the artistic dimension of the automobile and links it to the parallel worlds of painting, sculpture, architecture, photography and cinema, highlighting the multiple stylistic and conceptual affinities between the disciplines.

More than any other invention, the car has transformed the urban landscape and our way of life. To prove it, the exhibition brings together nearly 40 car models – each the best of its time in terms of beauty, rarity, vision – with works of art and architectural projects. The affinities between technology and creativity are multiple and unexpected. From the use of the wind tunnel, for example, were born the aerodynamic shapes of cars and those fluids of futurism, such as the sculpture of Boccioni Unique forms of continuity in space.

A photo of Norman Foster’s scenography for the Motion exhibition. Cars. Art. Architecture., Open at the Guggenheim Bilbao until September 18.

Movement. Cars. Art. Architecture.
Guggenheim Bilbao
April 8 – September 18, 2022


Abitare © All rights reserved
]]>
Show time | The Evolution of Exhibition Design https://expo-monet.com/show-time-the-evolution-of-exhibition-design/ Mon, 08 Aug 2022 11:27:05 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/show-time-the-evolution-of-exhibition-design/ In 2004, Suzanne MacLeod, then a lecturer and now Professor of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester, hosted Reshaping Museum Space, a lecture which was a timely and serious exploration of the skills of interpretive exhibition designers. MacLeod recognized the importance of bringing together a generation of museum curators, educators, and scholars with those […]]]>

In 2004, Suzanne MacLeod, then a lecturer and now Professor of Museum Studies at the University of Leicester, hosted Reshaping Museum Space, a lecture which was a timely and serious exploration of the skills of interpretive exhibition designers. MacLeod recognized the importance of bringing together a generation of museum curators, educators, and scholars with those leading this still emerging and expanding field.

It was a remarkable event, revealing the depth of the imagination that made museology evolve in the sector. It is recorded in Reshaping Museum Space, a 2005 publication that collects conference materials.

A second design-focused conference, Narrative Space, followed in 2010 with a publication, Museum Making: Narratives, Architectures, Exhibitions (2012). The University of Leicester has given us a platform to articulate our ideas, taking seriously our evolving interdisciplinary practice as co-producers of museums.

creative motivation

MacLeod continued to research and champion this field in publications and conferences, as well as holding masterclasses and conferences with leading designers, in Leicester and abroad. For more than 20 years now, students of museum studies have been learning the principles of making exhibitions – the results are already evident in a generation of more skilled curators.

The next step in Leicester’s museum research is to build an archive of museum design. It will begin as a pilot project with the release of four practices – Event Communications (now Event), Land Design Studio, Haley Sharpe Design (HSD), and Metaphor. This body of work spans the 1970s through the 1990s, taking into account the enormous impact of the National Lottery Heritage Fund, which was established in 1994 and is one of the last bastions of public sector patronage and practice. .

An exhibition at the Urbis Museum in Manchester designed by Land Design Studio. The museum opened in 2002 and closed in 2010

It’s also timely because most of the practice’s founders – Celestine Phelan (Event), Bill Haley (HSD), Rachel Morris and myself (both Metaphor) – have retired. Peter Higgins and Shirley Walker (Land Design Studio) are still working. Steve Simons (Event) sadly passed away in 2019.

The archive also completes a period within the Department of Museum Studies at Leicester. It begins with Eilean Hooper-Greenhill and Gaynor Kavanagh’s scholarship to open up content, interpretation and visitor engagement, and in particular to teach and inspire the group of social history curators in the 1980s.

The turmoil of Margaret Thatcher’s years as Prime Minister influenced a generation of students who became museum leaders, such as Mark O’Neill, David Fleming and Iain Watson. Future museum directors were influenced by what was happening in Leicester. Many of them have become our customers.

Telling life stories

People’s experiences needed to be told and we explored how their objects could speak for them. Since then Richard Sandell, MacLeod’s colleague in Leicester, has broadened the scope to address issues of inclusion relating to LGBTQI+ communities, people with disabilities and other groups, as well as identity, decolonisation, human rights and co-creation. These questions are embraced by museum leaders today.

In the most recent phase in Leicester, MacLeod and Sandell are undertaking collaborative research with cultural partners at the Research Center for Museums and Galleries, which was established in 1999. It is easy to take the earlier innovative thinking for granted, but it’s at the heart of the work of access consultants, audience assessors and others that didn’t exist when we started.

The four practices forming the pilot study have some funding to support it. Archivist and recent Ph.D. Peter Lester scours disparate archives. Projects range from the planning and design of entire museums, from the development of permanent galleries, temporary exhibitions and traveling exhibitions to the creation of exhibition pavilions, visitor centres, interpretive landscapes and cultural districts at all levels. These are national, regional and local projects.

Metaphor oversaw the redesign of the Holburne Museum in Bath in 2011

In Scotland, Event has done a series of projects for Glasgow Life – Kelvingrove Art Gallery and Museum, Riverside Museum and most recently the Burrell Collection. And Metaphor has worked on the sites of the National Museums of Scotland.

Our work has not been limited to the UK. Some of HSD’s best projects are in Canada, the United States and Hong Kong. Event has worked in Denmark, Oman and Poland. Land Design Studio has developed a range of immersive exhibition pavilions, while Metaphor has produced master plans around the world, including the Middle East.

None of us imagined that our work would become a resource, but variety and invention reflect different practices. There are analog artifacts, watercolors, models, renders, films, presentations and brochures. The archive also encompasses complex collaborations with leading graphic and interactive designers, filmmakers and artists. Think of the revolutionary PlayZone interactive games created by Land Design Studio at the Millennium Dome in 2000.

Back to the future

The archive will be a fantastic resource for designers, curators and students. And it will be the students who, through projects, help extend it to the next generation of interpretive designers.

At the heart of the archive is a common thread shared by all the practices, the progress reports made for the lottery funding process. These documents convey the intentions of the project to the institution, donors and trustees.

The same process is widely followed in overseas work. Reports are where gallery framework documents and design workshops are transformed into a picture of a complete visitor experience.

With around 1,500 projects, however, the next challenge will be how to make the archive accessible. We will find ways to access them by type of museum (national, regional or local); subject (fashion, design, social history, war, popular culture, etc.); range (from the British galleries of the Victoria and Albert Museum to the Titanic Experience in Belfast); and by project, because often there are offers for a project or a temporary exhibition in the same space.

Another element linking the archives will be podcasts and on-camera interviews with the founders of the interpretive exhibition design companies.

The Visitor Center at the Normandy American Cemetery in France was updated in 2019 with help from Haley Sharpe Design

None of us had the same qualifications. In the beginning, there was no MA in the narrative environments. Simons of Event had worked for Mischa Black at the Design Research Unit, an architecture, graphics and interior design firm linked to the 1951 Festival of Britain.

Event’s Phelan was a television screenwriter, while Metaphor’s Morris was also a novelist. Higgins and Walker of Land Design Studio had worked with Gary Withers, the founder of immersive design company Imagination. Higgins had also been a set designer at the BBC. I was an architect, teacher and then editor-in-chief of the Journal des architectes.

We each brought the experiences necessary to become interdisciplinary practices. We were all driven by beliefs, such as the belief that the audience is the actor, that museums can be immersive and films can be spatial, that the exhibition itself should be a work of art, that the designer is an author and that the museum experience should weave together personal stories and artifacts.

In 2004, Mark O’Neil of Glasgow Museums closed the Leicester conference with a hymn to a ghost star guest, Polish-American architect Daniel Libeskind. It was shorthand for the impact renowned architects could have on redesigning museum spaces. We knew we were exploring a dissonance between container and content.

How were our stories to be compatible with their expressive architecture, marked with their signature? We couldn’t have known then that Glasgow Life would appoint architect Zaha Hadid to design the Riverside Museum, or that the ‘Bilbao effect’ (triggered by Frank Gehry’s design of the Guggenheim Bilbao, opened in 1997) would become a more complex equation. .

Needless to say, our four firms have worked with renowned architects such as Hadid, Libeskind, Gehry, Foster and SnØhetta. This is another important research resource, as is the flip side – working with conservation architects on historic buildings.

Finally, don’t forget the unprepossessing lo-fi buildings that sometimes harbored remarkable experiences we had inside.

Our successors can decide what to draw from the archives of museum design as they face new challenges more daunting than those we have had to overcome.

Stephen Greenberg is the founder of Metaphor

]]>
23rd Triennale Milano, a guide to exhibition design https://expo-monet.com/23rd-triennale-milano-a-guide-to-exhibition-design/ Wed, 20 Jul 2022 16:05:21 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/23rd-triennale-milano-a-guide-to-exhibition-design/ The general layout of the 20 international pavilions was organized and designed by Francis Keré (Pritzker Architect 2022) with an almost abstract and orderly language, following an orthogonal grid of white walls resulting in long corridors that lead to rooms/spaces, then redesigned by the unique nations. (Access to this section of the Triennale is via […]]]>

The general layout of the 20 international pavilions was organized and designed by Francis Keré (Pritzker Architect 2022) with an almost abstract and orderly language, following an orthogonal grid of white walls resulting in long corridors that lead to rooms/spaces, then redesigned by the unique nations. (Access to this section of the Triennale is via a somewhat anonymous direct entrance from the atrium of the Palazzo dell’Arte or from a secondary access that we suggest and which passes through Corridoio Rosso (the Red Corridor), a space designed by Margherita Palli for the exhibition of the same name organized by Giovanni Agosti and Jacopo Stoppa). In the distribution and ordering of the sequence of spaces, the best-known international nations are located on the perimeter, while a central section houses the African participations, in an ideal embrace of these “emerging” nations, some of which participate for the first time, presenting their vision of art and culture to the world. In this section of the Triennale, Kéré has also been personally involved in two specific projects: “Yesterday’s Tomorrow”, a spatial installation that acts as the pivot of these spaces, in which the visitor can circulate towards the outside or towards the interior according to a spiral plan, admiring a graphic wall decoration typical of African countries and listening to voices which, as in an ancestral tale, try to capture the attention of the public by directing it towards the themes of the ‘Exposure ; an installation in the pavilion of Burkina Faso, his country of origin, in which a long wall has been created in a participatory action, by hand and with poor materials, and decorated with the vernacular signs and symbols of the country, attempting to give new life to this tradition of visual and architectural communication.

]]>
Inside the Barbican’s Our Time on Earth exhibition https://expo-monet.com/inside-the-barbicans-our-time-on-earth-exhibition/ Thu, 12 May 2022 15:20:17 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/inside-the-barbicans-our-time-on-earth-exhibition/ The forward-looking exhibit, curated by FranklinTill, was designed by Universal Design Studio with modularity and mobility in mind. By Henry Wong May 12, 2022 4:20 p.m. May 13, 2022 9:11 What will the future of Earth look like and how will art, design and science influence this vision? These are the questions that underlie the […]]]>

The forward-looking exhibit, curated by FranklinTill, was designed by Universal Design Studio with modularity and mobility in mind.

What will the future of Earth look like and how will art, design and science influence this vision? These are the questions that underlie the Barbican’s latest exhibition Our Time on Earth.

The exhibition – a collaboration between guest curators Kate Franklin and Caroline Till and Luke Kemp of the Barbican – showcases responses to the climate crisis from the perspective of design, art, science and technology.

Universal Design Studio (UDS) designed the 3D elements of the show, while Hato worked on the graphics.

“There is more scientific evidence than ever demonstrating the scale of the climate emergency,” explain Franklin and Till (who make up the FranklinTill research studio). “Science is essential – there is no doubt about it – but art, design and culture have the power to move us [into taking action].”

The show is told in three chapters, under the titles of belonging, imagining and engaging. Throughout these interconnected sections, visitors can immerse themselves in a video installation on the life of trees, in a piece by the indigenous-run Brazilian collective Selvagem, on our connection to the living environment.

Space10 also launched an interactive installation called The Ideal City 2040 at the expo, which visualizes how cities can embrace solutions to the climate crisis and improve people’s daily lives (you can watch a visual in the video below) .


“Radical visions for a sustainable future”

The ambition behind the scenography of the exhibition was to embrace as faithfully as possible the theme of the exhibition. “Our main focus was how to best present the narrative that FranklinTill and Luke Kemp were curating: radical visions for a sustainable future,” says Lisl du Toit, senior interior designer at UDS.

Du Toit and his team spent a lot of time determining the biggest design impact they could have, deciding that ultimately they should show “visitors the beauty and richness of sustainable design.” “We wanted to introduce visitors to a different design future – a positive and achievable future – and offer a radical alternative to sustainable exhibition design,” she adds.

Not surprisingly, materials played an important role in this process. A series of modular plywood structures (which can hold screens on both sides) and material dividers form the backbone of the exhibit. A sweep of hemp and felted wool curtains is used to further structure the sections.

These frames are combined with a variety of materials, which aim to reflect the themes of the section. The corrugated iron panels are made on a farm in Cambridgeshire, formed from hemp fibers and bound in a sugar-based resin made from agricultural waste. It’s a good alternative to corrugated iron, points out du Toit. Other materials include a leather-like material from Latvian designer Sarmite Polakova, derived from the inner bark of pine trees and a by-product of the logging industry. The panels were formed from recycled paper pulp from Barcelona-based materials start-up Honext.

UDS Material Exploration

The design team made sure to vary the layouts and material applications to keep things “vibrant and interesting,” du Toit says. Much of the exhibit is digital, and the design team’s emphasis on natural materials and organic forms is intended to provide an attractive contrast. “We liked the idea of ​​juxtaposing natural materials with digital, because an important part of the exhibit is to remind people that we are from the Earth and have an intrinsic connection to the natural world,” adds the designate.

Our Time on Earth is a traveling exhibit — heading to Quebec City, Canada — so the design team had to think carefully about mobility, du Toit explains. This involved removing non-essential elements and keeping weight and mobility at the forefront when choosing materials.

The use of materials, ease of movement and adaptability have been on the minds of exhibit designers for some time, but it was equally important to show that eco-friendly exhibits can also be beautiful. . “It can be rich, warm, intuitive and poetic,” she adds, pointing to the organic shapes, use of raw materials and “natural vibe” that contrast with more traditional exhibit staples like the white baseboards and half-timbered walls.

The designer adds: “These are beautiful, optimistic materials that are versatile and, above all, they are already available to us.”


Our Time on Earth is now open at the Barbican and will run until August 29. Tickets start at £18. More information on prices and opening hours can be found on the Barbican’s website.

]]>
formafantasma on the scenography of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition https://expo-monet.com/formafantasma-on-the-scenography-of-the-2022-venice-art-biennale-exhibition/ Fri, 06 May 2022 06:47:03 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/formafantasma-on-the-scenography-of-the-2022-venice-art-biennale-exhibition/ THE DESIGN OF THE EXHIBITION ‘THE MILK OF DREAMS’ Organized by Cecilia Alemani, the 59th Venice Art Biennale opened its doors to the public on Saturday April 23, 2022, under the title ‘Le Lait des Rêves’. This year’s main design exposure was designed by research-based design studio Formafantasma as a ‘tailor-made intervention which offers a […]]]>

THE DESIGN OF THE EXHIBITION ‘THE MILK OF DREAMS’

Organized by Cecilia Alemani, the 59th Venice Art Biennale opened its doors to the public on Saturday April 23, 2022, under the title ‘Le Lait des Rêves’. This year’s main design exposure was designed by research-based design studio Formafantasma as a ‘tailor-made intervention which offers a new, more cohesive way to navigate the artistic marathon that takes place in both the central pavilion of the Giardini and the 317-meter-long Corderie building of the Arsenale. Alongside the development of the general scenography of the exhibition, the studio developed the design into five smaller historical sections, each housing a miniature constellation of artworks, found objects and documents, grouped together to explore certain key themes. Conceived as time capsules, these architectural spaces are defined by unique color combinations, materials and spatial configurations that immerse visitors in completely different environments.

During the pre-opening of the Venice Art Biennale 2022, we had the chance to meet the founders of Formafantasma, Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin, to discuss more about the design of this year’s main exhibition.“What’s great about this year’s Biennale is this idea of ​​the five historical capsules, which are basically five spaces, three here [Giardini] and two at the Arsenale, which help the visitor to understand, from a historical point of view, what is happening all around the space,’ tell the two Italian designers to designboom. Watch full interview on the video above.

Andrea Trimarchi, Simone Farresin and Terra | image © designboom

Time Capsules by Formafantasma at the 2022 VENICE ART BIENNIAL

‘The main idea at the end of the day is quite simple. The scale of a show like this feels more like a fair than an art show, but of course the first thing you want to avoid is the feeling of a fair. So we really tried to create a more tailor-made intervention, especially in the historical capsules,’ Formafantasma tells designboom during our interview. This tailor-made approach succeeds in offering visitors clarity and better orientation in their journey through the thousands of works on display. “This is the first time in a biennale that you have this kind of intervention. Generally, you have a uniform gesture. Here, we had the opportunity to reflect on the overall layout, then on these five micro-exhibitions. Basically, it’s a bit like designing six exhibitions: a general one, then the five smaller ones,’ Andrea Trimarchi and Simone Farresin Explain.

The five historical capsules inside “The Milk of Dreams” are designed as micro-shows within the big show. They provide additional tools for investigation and introspection in relation to this year’s theme, and connect works of art from the past – including large museum loans and unconventional selections – to works by artists. contemporaries of the surrounding space. Three of the capsules are located in the central pavilion of the Giardini, including “The Witch’s Cradle”, dedicated to surrealist art; ‘Corps Orbite’, which brings together art related to writing; and ‘Technologies of Enchantment’, which features artists who bring somatic complexity to ‘programmed’ artistic creation. Meanwhile, at the Arsenale, visitors will find “A leaf A gourd A shell A net A bag A scarf A bag A bottle A jar A box A container”, a capsule dedicated to the ship; and “Seduction Of The Cyborg,” which borrows feminist theorist Donna Haraway’s framework for viewing included artists as cyborgs. Using 710 meters of Kvadrat textiles from different collections, as well as a curated selection of materials and colors, Formafantasma transformed each of these sections into museum-like spaces.

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
the theme of the 59th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia | image © designboom

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
Capsule ‘The Witch’s Cradle’ | image by Roberto Marossi, courtesy: La Biennale di Venezia

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
Capsule ‘The Witch’s Cradle’ | image by Marco Cappelletti, courtesy: La Biennale di Venezia

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
Capsule “Orbit Body” | image by Roberto Marossi, courtesy: La Biennale di Venezia

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
Capsule “Orbit Body” | image by Marco Cappelletti, courtesy: La Biennale di Venezia

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
Capsule ‘Technologies of Enchantment’ | image by Roberto Marossi, courtesy: La Biennale di Venezia

watch: formafantasma on the design of the 2022 venice art biennale exhibition
Capsule ‘Technologies of Enchantment’ | image © designboom

]]>
Designed to be disassembled: how architecture informs exhibition design and temporary installations https://expo-monet.com/designed-to-be-disassembled-how-architecture-informs-exhibition-design-and-temporary-installations/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/designed-to-be-disassembled-how-architecture-informs-exhibition-design-and-temporary-installations/ Designed to be disassembled: how architecture informs exhibition design and temporary installations PolyThread for Design Society Shenzhen / Jenny Sabin Studio. Photo © Zhang Chao Share Share Facebook]]>

Designed to be disassembled: how architecture informs exhibition design and temporary installations