Skip to main content
Category

Exhibition design

Hover a virtual preview of Es Devlin’s exhibition design for “About Time: Fashion and Duration”

By Exhibition design No Comments

British set designer Es Devlin designed monumental concert stages for Beyoncé and Lorde as well as genius theater sets for Othello at the Met Opera and Hamlet at the Barbican, among others. Devlin’s latest work does not feature musicians or actors. After months of COVID-related delays, the exhibit she designed for “About Time: Fashion and Duration” opens on October 29 at the Costume Institute of the Metropolitan Museum of Art. The show promises to be sensory overload, with Meryl Streep, Julianne Moore, and Nicole Kidman reading Virginia Woolf Orlando and Devlin’s dramatic set design creating a clock-like pathway through which visitors can explore the changing relationship of fashion to time. An animated glimpse into Devlin’s work – two interlocking clock-shaped galleries – makes its exclusive debut here.

The decision to work with Devlin came naturally; she had designed several sets for Louis Vuitton’s womenswear collections in Paris, and with the brand as the show’s sponsor, calling on a Devlin collaborator felt good. “My favorite part of the job is collaborating with other designers outside of the curatorial field,” says Andrew Bolton, Wendy Yu curator in charge of the Costume Institute. “I have been fortunate enough to work with these amazing creative people, and it really moves the story of the exhibition forward.

He continues, “It’s always important to me that an audience enjoys the exhibit, and it’s an experience for them, so we try to deliver these multisensory immersive experiences, where the installation kind of reinforces the narratives of the exposure we try to convey. In this particular case, we got to Es – I was a huge fan of her and thought I could work with her last year on ‘Camp: Notes on Fashion’, but we went to a different direction.

This change of stage for “Camp” turned out to be fortuitous for “About Time”. Bolton has long had a penchant for the stage in the 1994 film version of Orlando, where Tilda Swinton, in the lead role, rushes through a labyrinth of hedges and emerges transformed through time and fashion. “I thought the idea of ​​using a maze would be a good vehicle to convey this idea of ​​time travel, and Es has made a lot of mirrored mazes, so she is very familiar with the idea,” explains- he does. They spent a week working together on a maze concept in London before COVID, but serendipity struck again. “I got a call from the Met saying the New York Fire Department stopped the idea because it was a fire hazard, if it was dead ends and people just couldn’t go out, ”Bolton recalls. “I said, ‘Es, why don’t we just make a clock? Immediately, because Es is so creative, she just changed her path; there was no hesitation whatsoever. She started working on this concept of a clock, and oddly enough, I think it’s better than it originally would have been.

The final design of the exhibition consists of two circular galleries that mimic a clock face, connected by a dark central track. In the first gallery, time is presented in a linear fashion through combinations of clothing arranged in a chronological chronology. At the center of the gallery is a pendulum, the ultimate reminder of the ticking of the clock, with Bolton’s style timeline from 1870 to 2020 located around the perimeter of the room. The characters seen here in the animation, quite Victorian in silhouette, nod to the pairings Bolton made with the museum’s archives. Presenting the exhibit in this way, he explains, not only underscores the importance of the museum’s collection and the strength of a linear view of fashion, but also celebrates a curatorial style that the Met has championed at the early ’90s. “I wanted to focus on what has really been one of our major contributions to fashion conservation methodology over the years by focusing on this idea of ​​juxtaposition. The first time we did it was on a show called ‘Infra-Apparel’ in 1993; this is the first time that we have used this methodology, ”he explains.

Source link

Twelve warning urban tales. Exhibition design / Taller de Casqueria

By Exhibition design No Comments

Twelve warning urban tales. Exhibition design / Taller de Casqueria

© Galerna© Galerna© Galerna© Galerna+ 22


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    650 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:


    2020


  • Photographs Photographs: Galerna

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project

    Manufacturers: RJ brackets, Textilfy


  • Principal architect:

    Elena Fuertes, Ramón Martínez, lvaro Molins, Jorge Sobejano

© Galerna
© Galerna

Text description provided by the architects. The exhibition Twelve Warning Urban Tales, based on Superstudio’s Twelve Warning Tales for Christmas, aims to “rethink our role in the construction of the city”, in the words of Ethel Baraona, curator of the exhibition. . Through twelve installations that focus on different aspects of society and its relationship with the urban environment, Twelve Warning Urban Tales explores utopias and dystopias about the future of the city.

© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna

The exhibition route takes up the first idea of ​​the city as a limit: the physical and legal framework in which citizenship is born. The proposal defines a space within the Matadero Madrid exhibition space in which the interventions are located. Consequently, an intermediate space appears which is not an exterior properly speaking, but not an interior: a prolonged threshold that surrounds the exhibition. A semi-dark transition space, which allows the visitor to understand the exhibition from the outside and to look for alternative ways to approach it. A staircase placed in this threshold allows visitors to rise above the wall and have a distant view of the entire exhibition.

© Galerna
© Galerna
Development plan
Development plan
© Galerna
© Galerna

Inside the perimeter, the exhibition space is structured by a regular grid distorted by the proposed boundary. This structure in the form of a game board assigns a cell to each intervention and guides the movement of visitors through the exhibition, opening up different paths. The grid also serves as a support structure for each of the installations as well as for the graphic material, which takes the form of larger banners, flags and textiles. The materiality of the perimeter mixes and blurs the reflections of the interventions in a continuous background.

© Galerna
© Galerna
Elevation
Elevation
© Galerna
© Galerna

Twelve uplifting urban narratives construct an image of the city based on different projections of the future to come, prompting visitors to create their own narrative.

© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna


Source link

“It could spark a revolution”: the design of the post-COVID exhibition

By Exhibition design No Comments

As museums and galleries begin to open, we take a look at how the exhibition design has been adapted to immediate needs and how it could change forever.

The Design Museum was scheduled to host Kraftwerk and The Chemical Brothers on April 1. The coronavirus outbreak put an end to that but not before the creation of Electronic: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers. The last temporary exhibition at the Musée de Londres is a transfer from the Musée de la Musique-Philarmonie de Paris, initially organized by Jean-Yves LeLoup. According to the Design Museum, it will transport visitors through “the people, art, design, technology and photography that have shaped the electronic music landscape” by evoking the experience of being in a club.

Nightclubs and exhibitions trying to evoke nightclubs are not a viable concept in an age of social distancing. But when the museum partially reopens on July 31 with the exhibit, it is hoped that new measures will keep visitors and staff safe (and provide peace of mind). This will in part be achieved through a new “Safe and Sound” policy which details how the museum complies with government guidelines. All visitors will wear masks, the capacity of bicycle parking has been doubled to make it easier for people to cycle to the site and there will be hand disinfection stations.

Core, by 1024 Architecture at the Parisian edition of Electronic

The museum also aims to halve the number of visitors to the exhibit at any given time. This goal, while safer for visitors and staff, clearly poses problems for ticket sales. To cover the potential shortfall, the venue opens later in the evening, until 9 p.m. each day. To keep pace, all tours can now only last an hour and a half. The Design Museum’s director of hearings, Joséphine Chanter, says the delay is “largely self-regulated.”

The scenography of the exhibition was modified during the confinement to reflect these new needs. All interactive screens, those using iPads for example, have been removed. Any touchscreen that would be used by hundreds of people a day is no longer a possibility. Visitors will also need to bring their own headphones for the sound elements of the exhibition. (This development is reminiscent of trends in aircraft inflight entertainment systems, where the use of personal devices is likely to increase.) There is also now a one-way system throughout the exhibit; there will be no spaces where people can pass each other. This will be aided by ground graphics that encourage social distancing, designed by London-based Studio LP.


A “quieter pace”

Virtual studio of composer Jean-Michel Jarre

The museum’s chief curator, Justin McGuirk, told Design Week that the lockdown gave the team an opportunity to “think” about how the guidelines would affect the show. “Spatially, a key factor has been creating more space around objects,” he says. This means that some experiences and some items have been removed. An “interactive battery experience” has been removed, for example.

McGuirk hopes the changes won’t take anything away from the experience, but may make it “smoother.” “I actually think one of the possible opportunities is that it creates a slightly quieter experience for the visitor,” he says. They could, he said, reduce clutter and “pinch points” where visitors crowd around the work. “It might sound more intimate and exclusive.”

MR 808, the interactive drum, which will no longer be present

When the museum reopens, Electronic will be the only major London exhibit to open for the first time, according to McGuirk. There will likely be a period of trial and error as institutions determine what works and what does not. “I don’t suppose we have to rethink exhibits forever,” McGuirk believes, but that this is an interesting “test bed” for new ideas. “Museums will watch each other closely to see what works and what doesn’t,” he says.

Only Electronic will be open when the Design Museum reopens. In October there will be a Margaret Calvert retrospective on the first floor around the balcony galleries. A one-way route will probably be set up for the Calvert exhibition. Beazley Designs on the Year opens later in the year, a showcase for innovative design concepts. The exhibit was designed in containment and uses scaffolding to showcase the projects. Each object is given a 1.5m grid, which means visitors will be aware of the distance throughout. “Social distancing is built into the design,” adds McGuirk.


Find a “linear route”

National Trust Sutton Hoo exhibit, designed by Nissen Richards Studio

Nissen Richards studio manager Pippa Nissen told Design Week she had worked on “design in” solutions for temporary exhibitions to show clear routes as well as reconfigure permanent spaces with clear routes. signposted. Nissen has been working on a referral solution for The Wallace Collection, when the London art venue opens on July 15. She describes “adapting a museum to be able to open” a “ridiculously fun” process.

Finding a ‘linear route’ in a space is handy for smoother and socially distanced journeys, but it’s also about ‘making people feel good’. “As you step into each space, you can assess your own experience,” she says, which means “clear visibility” is crucial. While this type of “spatial configuration” needs to be put in place immediately, Nissen believes that some of it may “spill over” into longer-term exhibition design.

Orientation may not be the only design element affected. COVID could “launch a digital revolution” at exhibitions. The move away from iPads and “low-tech interactives” will see the role of “gesture-controlled interactives” increase, according to Nissen. This would likely include augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), and the ability of technology to alter the spaces around visitors. While the lockdown has made it clear how technology makes cultural institutions available in our own rooms, the ability to transform grandiose venues has been a theme in exhibition design for some time, as we have seen. at the London Design Festival last year.

non-flag-resized
Non-Pavilion, a VR installation by Studio Micat, There Project and Proud Studio at the V&A for last year’s London Design Festival

“Information layers”

It’s not just about what happens in a place, but how the whole experience can change. Nissen suggests that the change could push towards “information layers” where the onus is on the visitor to take control. “Maybe you collect things that you dig into later,” she says. Objects can still be displayed “clearly and beautifully”, but there may be less information presented in the exhibition itself. This would of course call for social distancing and shorter visit times, if the current lockdown measures continue.

There will likely be a shift towards even more organized experiences. By creating linear routes through familiar spaces, people can encounter spaces differently. But for temporary exhibitions, there will be fewer built-in choices. This is echoed by the electronics of the Design Museum – the times when visitors had a choice throughout the exhibition have been removed. “It’s going to be a lot more about having someone’s pre-designed experience than spaces that are too full of choice,” suggests Nissen.


A shift towards sustainability

History of the Norwegian Book, at the National Library in Oslo

Like all areas of design grappling with a virus that lives on surfaces, materials will be a high priority going forward. The Nissen team re-examines longer term projects and ensures that any material used is “very durable” as it will need to be cleaned often and thoroughly and not be affected. There is an opportunity to be ‘playful’ with this aspect of design if used with care, like wood and metals. They can be used visually, for example, and placed out of reach.

All the time spent at home, in virtual meetings, and staring at computer screens, will result in a thirst for materials that show signs of life, Nissen suspects. Whether it’s a metal with an interesting patina or recycled plastics – where you can see it’s recycled. Nissen Richards likes Richlite, a kind of “compacted paper” that can be cleaned and printed to give it visual texture. “Anything other than Forex,” she adds.

There could be a broader shift towards sustainability in exhibition design, says Nissen. The studio is working on two or three projects with some clients and discussing how these incorporate more sustainable features. Designs that can be built and then adapted for different exhibitions, rather than just changing them up every time. The idea of ​​reusing sets in this way was a frequent topic at this year’s canceled Salone del Mobile premiere, where designers discussed possible ways to make festivals more sustainable.

“We can’t waste so much anymore,” says Nissen. One such idea could be to use the center of a room as an “anchor point” to which a modular design part could be attached, with the ability to be positioned in different ways. By moving the model 90 degrees, you can transform the space, from individual rooms to longer hallways, for example. Color, graphics and layers will also play an important role in adapting spaces, adds Nissen.

Thinking both short and long term will be a requirement for designers in the months and years to come. As Nissen notes, “there’s a rule one week and another the next.” The guiding grids that Nissen is working on right now might look “old school” next month. The only thing that seems certain is a need for adaptation.


Electronics: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers opens on July 13, 2020 at the Design Museum, 224 – 238 Kensington High Street London W8 6AG. Tickets start at £ 16. Please visit website for details.

Source link

Design in 2020 – what will exhibition design look like?

By Exhibition design No Comments

As part of our 2020 design series, set designer Gitta Gschwendtner takes a look at what’s going to happen in exhibition design over the next 12 months.

What do you think 2020 will hold in exhibition design?

I fear we face a bleak future with Boris Johnson as Prime Minister for another 5 years and Brexit is looming. So I think the exhibitions will have to offer a much needed escape. We’re not in a recession yet and budgets aren’t completely depleted, so there may well be one last hurray before it gets really dark. I could imagine that 2020 will bring some extravagant, immersive exhibits that will take visitors outside of reality and infuse a bit of whimsy into their lives. I imagine the next V&A exhibition on Alice in Wonderland Alice: Curiouser and Curiouser will arrive here.

Asset strippers. Courtesy of Tate Photography, Mike Nelson.

What was your favorite exhibition design project of 2019 and why?

Contrary to my opulent exhibition prediction for 2020, my favorite show of 2019 was Mike Nelson’s The Asset Strippers on Tate Britain. I absolutely loved the disused industrial machines, beautiful and fat, telling stories of past production and visions of society. Mike Nelson paid homage to the origins of the Duveen Galleries as the first specially constructed sculpture galleries in England and elevated industrial machines to works of art. Placed in the superb central galleries, they have become beautiful and proud markers of a lost time. Their placement and juxtaposition was also awesome.

Source link

Winners of the 2019 Best of Design Awards for Exhibition Design

By Exhibition design No Comments

Best of Design Award 2019 for the design of exhibitions: Calder: Non spatial
Designate: STEPHANIEGOTO
Site: Los Angeles

The design aimed to transform the Hauser & Wirth gallery to create a presence for the show. The removal of the strong classical framework of the existing south gallery established a neutral context. The addition of an illuminated cloud-like ceiling canvas compressed and unified the two lengths of the interior, establishing a shadowless volume that emphasized the lines, edges and negative spaces beyond Calder’s sculptures. . These interventions created a strong and identifiable language, which encouraged dynamic energy and quietly focused the viewer’s experience. The works offered the opportunity to capture moments of closeness, to discover their other world and to see the many relationships between them.

Honorable mentions:

Name of the project: VENTS
Designate: TEMPO | Catty Dan Zhang

Exhibition design: Honorable mention: VENTS (Toby Shearer)

Name of the project: Nature — Cooper Hewitt Triennial
Designate: Studio Joseph

Interior photo of hanging glass light bulbs
Exhibition design: Honorable mention: Nature—Cooper Hewitt Triennial (courtesy of Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum)

Editor’s Choice

Name of the project: Common threads
Designate: ikd

Name of the project: Model projections
Designate: Agency — Agency

Source link

Armenian American Museum Announces Lead Exhibition Design and Planning Company – Asbarez.com

By Exhibition design No Comments
A concept design by the Armenian American Museum

GLENDALE — The Armenian American Museum has announced the selection of world-renowned Gallagher & Associates as the lead exhibition design and planning company for the project. G&A is an internationally renowned interdisciplinary design studio, with offices in Washington, DC, New York, Portland and Singapore.

“We are honored to have been selected as the lead exhibition design and planning company for the Armenian American Museum,” said Patrick Gallagher, President and Owner of Gallagher & Associates. “As storytellers, our goal is to create a truly unique, immersive and impactful experience for every visitor to the Armenian American Museum.”

Gallagher & Associates brings over 20 years of museum planning and design experience to the developing cultural and educational center. G&A has established its reputation in the museum industry for bringing life-changing experiences to life. The company integrates design and interactive media with the physical environment to produce immersive experiences that engage, entertain, and create measurable impact.

Gallagher & Associates designed the online experience for the Armenian Genocide Museum website, an online museum that places the atrocities of the Armenian Genocide in the context of world history and connects visitors to current crimes against humanity to inspire people to speak out and take action. Notable G&A projects include the National Center for Civil Rights and Human Rights, International Spy Museum, National Archives Museum, National Museum of American Jewish History, Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum, Grammy Museum, and more. The company is currently working with the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles.

“We are delighted to be working with a company of the caliber and reputation of Gallagher & Associates in the museum industry,” said Executive Chairman Berdj Karapetian. “The firm will be an invaluable partner in helping us realize our ultimate vision for the Armenian American Museum.”

Gallagher & Associates will lead the design of the museum’s Armenian permanent exhibit. The permanent exhibit will share the Armenian-American experience, including the history of Armenia, the Armenian Genocide, and Armenians living in America through interactive, immersive and impactful storytelling. The company will engage a panel of leading academics, artists and experts throughout the exhibition design process. The museum will also feature traveling exhibits on various cultures and topics that will engage a wide audience and serve as a bridge that connects our multicultural community.

In addition, Gallagher & Associates will develop the museum master plan which outlines key visitor experiences within the general parameters of architecture. The master plan links experiences to the organization’s mission, collections and educational goals, with a focus on the visitor. G&A will be part of the museum’s project design team, working closely with architects, engineers and consultants as they prepare detailed construction plans for submission to the City of Glendale.

The Armenian American Museum is currently in the pre-construction phase of the project, with plans to begin construction in 2020.

The city of Glendale, home to one of the largest communities in the Armenian Diaspora, has dedicated a prime location for the historic project in downtown Central Park.

About the Armenian American Museum

The Armenian American Cultural Center and Museum of California is a developing project in Glendale, California, whose mission is to promote understanding and appreciation of America’s ethnic and cultural diversity by sharing the Armenian-American experience. . The museum will serve as a cultural campus that will enrich the community, educate the public about Armenian-American history, and allow individuals to embrace cultural diversity and speak out against prejudice.

The governance of the museum is entrusted to ten nonprofit Armenian cultural, philanthropic and religious institutions, including the Armenian Catholic Eparchy, the Armenian Cultural Foundation, the Armenian Evangelical Union of North America, the General Armenian Charitable Union. from the Western District, the Armenian Missionary Association of America. , Armenian Relief Society Western USA, Nor Or Charitable Foundation, Nor Serount Cultural Association, Western Diocese of the Armenian Church of North America, and Western Prelacy of the Armenian Apostolic Church.

Source link

Downton Abbey exhibition, design fairs, iconic hotels

By Exhibition design No Comments

NBC

Palm Beach, Florida (including West Palm, right across from Lake Worth) has increased its design quotient this winter, with great museums, iconic hotels, and special exhibits, including the popular Downton Abbey display. Plus, there’s always upscale style – and those Atlantic beaches.

The breakers

In the late 1890s, Henry M. Flagler, one of America’s great industrialists, built The Royal Poinciana, a six-story Georgian beauty. Two years later, Flagler opened its first beachfront hotel, The “Breakers”, where the waves crashed and sprayed.

After the fires of 1903 and 1925, the hotel resurfaced even more opulent. New York designers Shultze and Weaver, who would later create the Pierre, Sherry-Netherland and Waldorf Astoria hotels in Manhattan, described the Breakers as “the pinnacle of perfection in design and magnificence.”

The Breakers was modeled after the Villa Medici in Rome, an ambitious effort that saw 75 artisans from Italy complete the intricate paintings on the ceilings of the 200-foot-long main hall and the first-floor public rooms, which are still on display.

Rockefellers, Vanderbilts, Astors, Andrew Carnegie and JP Morgan, have vacationed alongside US Presidents and European nobility. Today, the grand hotel emphasizes green efforts, including energy efficiency, water conservation and waste reduction. It is engaged in environmental programs and is a Green Power Partner of the US Environmental Protection Agency.

Flagler Museum

When completed in 1902, the New York Herald proclaimed that Whitehall, the estate of Henry Flagler’s heyday in Palm Beach, was “more wonderful than any palace in Europe, bigger and more magnificent than any other private home in the world.”

Today, Whitehall is a National Historic Landmark and is open to the public as the Flagler Museum, offering tours, temporary exhibits and special programs.

Brazilian court

Steps from Worth Avenue shopping, courtyard restaurants and the ocean, this historic boutique hotel features Mediterranean architecture, tropical courtyards and splashing fountains. The Brazilian Court is a 1920s landmark with 80 upscale-style rooms and a classic luxury getaway in Palm Beach, complete with Cafe Boulad, a secluded palm-fringed pool, and two tropical courtyards.

Five more reasons Palm Beach is appealing – right now:

  • The Kips Bay Decorator Show House Palm Beach—The Florida iteration of the prestigious four-decade Designer Show House program in New York City — lists more than 20 of the nation’s most talented interior designers to transform a 10,000-square-foot Mediterranean-style mansion along the ‘Intracoastal Waterway. Theatrical design statements to be exhibited by industry veterans Danielle Rollins, David Scott and Meg Braff, among others. The program raises funds for the Kips Bay Boys & Girls Club and the Boys & Girls Clubs of Palm Beach County.
  • Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa– The Forbes Five-Star Resort offers refurbished rooms designed by Jonathan adler which brings its signature touches of color to the customer experience. The resort offers a Kips Bay Decorator’s Show House Opening Weekend Package, including show house tickets and a Mediterranean breakfast for two at the resort’s Temple Orange Mediterranean Bistro.
  • Downton Abbey: the exhibition After a successful run in New York, Downton Abbey: the exhibition winters in S Florida, West Palm Beach. Visitors are transported on an incredible journey through the grand abode of Downton abbey and offered a glimpse into the world of the Crawleys and those who served them under the stairs. The most recognizable and beloved sets from the series, as well as more than 50 official costumes from the series are on display.
  • The reinvented Place Royale Poinciana offers one-of-a-kind luxury fashion / design shopping experiences. In its layout around a central courtyard with landscaping designed by Design by Nievera Williams, the square echoes some of Europe’s legendary shopping destinations, such as the Palais Royal in Paris.
  • The West Palm Design District, known locally as Row of antiques– offers an array of lifestyle boutiques and showrooms such as Sean Rush Workshop. The region has also seen a wave of news, design-oriented restaurants featuring spectacular chefs and cuisine.
Source link

2×8 2019 | AIA Los Angeles | Exhibition design competition

By Exhibition design No Comments

2×8 2019 | AIA Los Angeles | Exhibition design competition

The 2 × 8 student competition, exhibition and scholarship program features exemplary work by students from architecture and design institutions from across California. Celebrating the state’s unparalleled diversity in educational guidance, each of the participating university programs selects two student projects that embody their primary vision. No less than 16 schools participate in the annual fair.

Participating students exhibit their work in a public place and have the opportunity to receive scholarships to continue their studies as architects of tomorrow.

In 2018, 2 × 8 program sponsors awarded scholarships of $ 13,000 to students with winning projects from East LA College, USC School of Architecture, CA College of the Arts, Woodbury, UCLA, Cal Poly Pomona, and Otis College of Art & Design. . This year’s goal is to raise $ 25,000 for the 2 × 8 student project exhibition and scholarship program!

Design challenge

Design, build and install the physical manifestation of the 2×8 2019 exhibition to showcase up to 32 student projects. Student work can be displayed in any way (printed tables, digital media, projection, etc.) and design proposals should specifically prescribe the presentation format (size, proportions, etc.). The exhibition design concept should be flexible, as the number of school entries may not be finalized until a winner is selected. The design should include a “sponsorship wall” element of some type and, at a minimum, an eye-catching element in the public paseo on Helms Ave to alert passers-by to the exhibit inside. The elements can be built or placed in the paseo, inside the space, hung on the walls, etc. At the end of the show however, the space should be returned in the same condition as it was found.

Additional information / Request for proposal can be found here.

Download the information about this competition here.

  • Title

    2×8 2019 | AIA Los Angeles | Exhibition design competition

  • Type

    Announcement of the competition (built projects and master plans)

  • Organizers

  • Registration deadline

    February 01, 2019 11:59 AM

  • Submission deadline

    February 12, 2019 11:59 AM

  • Place

    Helms Bakery District

  • Price

    25 $

This contest was submitted by an ArchDaily user. If you would like to submit a competition, a call for entries or any other architectural “opportunity”, please use our “Submit a competition” form. The opinions expressed in advertisements submitted by ArchDaily users do not necessarily reflect the views of ArchDaily.


Source link

Design in 2019 – what will exhibition design look like?

By Exhibition design No Comments

As part of our 2019 design series, Pernilla Ohrstedt, founder of her eponymous studio, takes a look at what will happen in exhibition design over the next 12 months.

Pernilla Ohrstedt, founder of her eponymous studio. © Eric Guillemain.

What do you think 2019 will hold in exhibition design?

2019 is a year on the lookout for small radical exhibitions. I am very excited about José Esparza’s new reign at Storefront for Art and Architecture in New York. A new vision for one of the smallest but most interesting exhibition spaces I have ever worked with. Equally exciting will be the exhibits and events that former Storefront Director Eva Franch Gilbert will bring to the Architectural Association (AA), which she now directs.

What was your favorite exhibition design project of 2018 and why?

Photo: David Heald. © 2018 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.

Paintings for the Future by Swedish artist Hilma af Klint at the Guggenheim in New York was my favorite. Rarely has a building and the work of an artist expressed such a synergy. It’s as if the building was made for this show, even though its groundbreaking work – which was only recently revealed – replaced the half-decade-old building.

The high double-height galleries show off his breathtaking “Ten Largest” from 1907, illuminated by semicircular skylights. And the continuous circular ascension spatially reinforces the message and importance of her work – the future has finally caught up with her.

Installation photos: Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photo: David Heald. © 2018 Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation.
Source link

Winners of the A ‘Interior Space, Retail and Exhibition Design Award

By Exhibition design No Comments

Winners of the A ‘Interior Space, Retail and Exhibition Design Award

A ‘Design Award & Competition, the world’s largest and most widely distributed international design awards, with 1,962 winners from 100 countries in 99 different design disciplines. Among the many prizes awarded in the world of design, the A ‘Design Award stands out for its exceptional scale and breadth; in 2015, more than 1,000 different designs were awarded, all areas of design being recognized by the 100 different categories of the award. This year’s edition is now open for registration; designers can save their submissions here.

There are five different levels of distinction: Platinum, Gold, Silver, Bronze and Iron A ‘Design Awards, which are distributed annually across all design disciplines. Designers, companies and institutions from all countries are invited every year to participate in the open call by nominating their best works, projects and products for consideration.

While there is no shortage of design awards, the A ‘Design Award stands out for its exceptional scale; with more than 100 models categories. In addition to a category for architecture, building and structural design, the award includes a number of categories that may be of benefit to people in the world of architecture, including categories for Good industrial design award, Good architecture design price, Good product design award, Good communication design award, Good service design price, and Good Fashion Design Award. You can see all the categories on their website here.

The submission period for the A ‘Design Award closes February 28. You can register here. Following the announcement of the winners on April 15, a selection of architecture-related winners will be featured in an article on ArchDaily.

Below we have selected the winners from previous years. You might also see more award winning designs here.

Beijing Morning Star Ballet Foundation / Ballet school / Winston Yeo

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Skynet / Exhibition space / Kris Lin

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

City of Begonia / Sales center / SUN and Hongtao Sun

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Recrystallization / Cinema / Yang Wang and Lei Lee

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

New design for DSK bank / Flagship branch / DA Architects

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

In the art world / Gallery / Joy Chou

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Transparent PONE shell / Exhibition space / PONE ARCHITECTURE

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Brickkiln Folk Inn and Museum / Make Village Newborn / Kevin Hu

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Qingtie CR City Sales Office / Sales office / Kot Ge – LSDCASA and Studio HBA

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Kikuchi City Central Library / Municipal Public Library / Kazunobu Nakamura

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Battery table / Product presentation / Joe Chan

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Japanese cuisine Setsugekka / Japanese cuisine / Hip-pop design team

Hangzhou Zhongshuge Bookstore / Bookstore / Xiang Li

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Creative incubators / Office space / Rui Zhao

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Roaringwild – Uniwalk / Retail store / Kinson Leung

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Jerry House / Residential: Private House / Arisara Chaktranon and Siriyot Chaiamnuay

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Grand Gourmet flagship store / Shop / Zhenfei Wang

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Progressive and lonely / Residential Public Space / Create + Think Design Studio

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Existing white / Exhibition design / Robin Wang

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Japanese restaurant Kin Ju / Japanese restaurant / CM Design

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards

Jinmao Residence in Beijing / Villa Apartment / Tina Sheng and Li Yue

Courtesy of A 'Design Awards
Courtesy of A ‘Design Awards


Source link