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AMO’s first exhibition design in China unveiled in Beijing

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AMO’s first exhibition design in China unveiled in Beijing

OMA AMO’s research and design office has opened True me, the studio’s first exhibition design in China. Built in the 798 Art Factory in Beijing, True Me explores modern selfie culture and modes of self-representation through art and media. Organized by app developer Meitu and the Beijing Contemporary Arts Foundation, the exhibition features works by Hou Ying, Lu Yang, Maleonn, Xie Haiwei, Ye Funa, Chen Tianzhuo, teamLab and Theodore Bradley. Celebrating the launch of Meitu’s new logo, the exhibit expands AMO’s interest in the study of visual culture.

True me.  Image courtesy of the OMATrue me.  Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMATrue me.  Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMATrue me.  Image courtesy of the OMA+ 20

True me.  Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA
True me. Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA
True me.  Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA
True me. Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA

True me bases AMO research on a staged space literally reflecting the nature of the Meitu application. Over a billion users use Meitu to edit selfie images and produce reimagined expressions of themselves. Continuing the vein of AMO’s work beyond fashion show decors and store interiors, the concept of the exhibition plays on the contradiction of application between the raw self and the interior and the post-produced image. that is created. The spaces are aligned along a central corridor connected to a series of spaces. These rooms are clad in head-to-toe curved mirrors along the hallway to reflect the notion of the outer self. Inside, six soft areas clad in flannel, felt and grass display the idea of ​​inner self. Together, the hallway and rooms take visitors on a journey through visual works of art and performance spaces.

True me.  Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA
True me. Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA
True me.  Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA
True me. Image © Bian Jie, courtesy of the OMA

As part of OMA’s growing interest in Asia’s vibrant progressive cultural scenes, the exhibition design was led by OMA partner and Asia director Chris van Duijn. The project is part of a sequence of cultural projects designed at OMA’s Hong Kong office, including the Genesis Gangnam store in Seoul and the cultural spaces of the recently opened Columbia Circle in Shanghai. Currently, the OMA is working on the extension of a leading art institute in Beijing which will be completed at the end of this year.

True me will be open to visitors at the 798 Art Factory until August 14, 2018


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studio shiro completes exhibition design for enzo ferrari museum

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london studio shiro recently completed the design of the “rosso & rosa” exhibition for ferrari celebrating the relationship between women and ferrari throughout the brand’s history. the immersive installation uses a series of intersecting walls scattered across the sloping floor of the enzo ferrari museum in modena.

the height of display walls constantly varies from 1 meter to 3 meters

the variation in height and angle of the exhibition walls allows visitors to create their own itinerary and see the large cars and photographs from the ferrari archives, depicting women owners, racers and their cars. each self-supporting wall is constructed from a light steel structure covered with a translucent fabric.

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
view of the installation

“When Ferrari asked me to develop the concept for this exhibition, I wanted to frame and structure the opening of the layout, introducing a series of crisscrossing walls that could gradually reveal both cars and photographs while preserving a wide visual perspective on the 2,000 square meters of display ‘ explains ardrea morgante, the founder of shiro studio, who originally led the design and construction of the enzo ferrari museum in 2012.

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
visitors are free to choose their own itinerary throughout the exhibition

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
display wall detail

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
panoramic view of the floor space of the enzo ferrari museum

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
through large images from the ferrari historical archives the exhibition illustrates the relationship between women and ferrari

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
the sculptural presence of the walls on the sloping floor helps to gradually reveal the cars on display

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
shiro studio artistically directed all aspects of the exhibition design, including the graphics applied to the vertical surfaces

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
detailed view of the display

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
cars, photographs and graphics merge across the entire screen

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
view of the cars exhibited inside the enzo ferrari museum

studio shiro completes the design of the 'rosso & rosa' exhibition for the enzo ferrari museum in modena
the exhibition plan allows for unexpected perspectives

designboom received this project from our ‘DIY submissions‘, where we invite our readers to submit their own work for publication. see more project submissions from our readers here.

edited by: maria erman | design boom

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ArandaLasch creates the exhibition scenography for the Kaws retrospective in Shanghai

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Eight-meter-tall sculptures skim the ceiling of the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, which is currently hosting the first retrospective of artist Kaws in Asia and showcasing the exhibition design by Aranda Lasch.


The New York and Arizona-based design company, founded by Benjamin Aranda and Chris Lasch in 2009, based its design around the large-scale works produced by Kaws.

Design of the Aranda  Lasch KAWS exhibition for the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, China

“Kaws enjoys working with physical models, so we built a 15-foot-long model of the museum to familiarize ourselves with its enormous scale,” Aranda told Dezeen. “It used to be an airplane hangar and its size is quite misleading in the photographs.”

“The design engages the massive hangar space with simple but large architectural elements, a room and a wall, which serve to organize the artwork around them.”

Design of the Aranda  Lasch KAWS exhibition for the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, China

Kaws, real name Brian Donnelly, is known for his brightly colored, cartoon-like works and limited edition objects. The Brooklyn-based artist has previously painted his iconic designs on two basketball courts in New York City for Nike.

The exhibition, titled Where the End Starts, features key paintings, sculptures, drawings and toys that the artist created over the past 20 years of his career. It’s the first time he’s had a retrospective in Asia.

The largest pieces in the exhibition are contained in the great gallery room and almost reach the ceiling, which is eight meters high.

Design of the Aranda  Lasch KAWS exhibition for the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, China

Other smaller sculptures and paintings are scattered throughout the surrounding galleries.

“Designed as a kind of temple, the Great Hall is a space of intense concentration realized through an illuminated ceiling above the room, Passing companion“said Aranda.

Design of the Aranda  Lasch KAWS exhibition for the Yuz Museum in Shanghai, China

“Each of the surrounding galleries showcase different aspects of his work, from black and white works to his formative graffiti works to his smaller scale collectibles,” he continued. “These are not strict divisions, but they follow intense and focused production over the years. “

Aranda and Lasch founded their eponymous studio in 2009. Other company projects include a foam pyramid seating installation, shown at the Venice Architecture Biennale 2010, and a temporary pavilion designed for the Design Miami collectors.

Kaws: Where the End Starts is on display at the Yuz Museum in Shanghai until August 13.

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aranda lasch designs the scenography for the monumental exhibition KAWS

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From now until August 13, the Yuz Museum in Shanghai is hosting a monumental exhibition of the work of Brooklyn-based artist KAWS. inside the institution’s expansive interior, the design of the exhibition was conceived by the new york design firm and toscon aranda lasch to host large and small-scale sculptures, as well as a series of paintings. thinking of the site – a former hangar – benjamin aranda and chris lasch sought to engage the massive scale of the museum through simple but significant architectural elements that serve to organize the work of art around them.

‘little lie’, ‘along the way’, ‘right now’, ‘together’ and ‘know better’

working closely with KAWS and curators of the yuz museum and the modern fort value, aranda lasch envisioned the exhibit as a site for both monumental exhibit and intimate worship. the main exhibition area was designed as a kind of temple – a space of intense concentration. in a room carved out of the main space, an ethereal sensibility is achieved through an illuminated ceiling placed above a unique large-scale sculpture titled ‘Companion Passing Through’. around the ‘temple’ is a room filled with wood carvings and a monolithic wall that displays ‘chum’.

aranda lasch
the great room with ‘at this hour’, ‘little lie’, ‘together’, ‘boyfriend’ and ‘good intentions’

In addition to the exhibition of monumental sculptures, the exhibition also offers a comprehensive overview of the multifaceted work of KAWS through a range of media. featured in the surrounding galleries – each offering a different take on KAWS ‘work – are black and white pieces, his formative graffiti works, and smaller scale collectibles. “KAWS: Where the End Begins” engages visitors through the exhibition of numerous large-scale works and painted pieces, offering a new perspective on the artist’s practice and a powerful presentation to her Chinese audience.

aranda lasch
“Better know”, with “born to fold” in the background

aranda lasch
the great room with “born to fold”, “passing companion” and “clean board”

aranda lasch
the great room presents sculptures such as “born to bend” and “better know”

aranda lasch
‘companions’ resting place’

aranda lasch
‘companion of passage’

aranda lasch
‘untitled (MBFB5)’, ‘buddy’, ‘new morning’, ‘accomplice’ and ‘man’s best friend’

aranda lasch
“Five suspects”, “silent city”, “he eats alone (sincere greetings)” and “a trusted business”

aranda lasch
gallery rooms at KAWS: where the end begins

aranda lasch
‘untitled (kimpsons)’, ‘the KAWS album’, ‘untitled (MBFU9)’

aranda lasch
ephemeral room

project info:

team:
aranda lasch:
benjamin aranda, chris lasch, joaquin bonifaz
yuz museum: Diana huang
the modern fort is worth: andrea karnes
Cut: 42,000 square feet
site: Shanghai, China

to safeguard

to safeguard

nina azzarello I design boom

June 22, 2017

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Design review for Lina Bo Bardi’s exhibition at the Museum of A in São Paulo

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When the São Paulo Art Museum (MASP) opened the doors of its new home in 1969, visitors were shocked to find over 100 paintings hovering in the main gallery, with each work hanging from a glass panel rather than a wall. In the 1990s, this unprecedented project, designed by modernist building architect Lina Bo Bardi, fell out of favor and the space was carved out with standard partitions. Like much of the growing fan club of Italian-Brazilian talent, I had to content myself with experiencing its radical hook-up through ghostly black and white photographs, those vintage images recording the feel of grabbing an entire collection. at a glance. But last December, Bo Bardi’s original scheme was recreated – and it’s as surprising today as it was half a century ago.

Prior to immigrating to Brazil in 1946, Bo Bardi had witnessed the exhibition of unorthodox art in historic buildings through the work of Franco Albini, who placed paintings on free-standing metal rods in his reimagined galleries at the Pinacoteca di Brera in Milan. On the other side of the Atlantic, Bo Bardi experiments with daring, reconsidering museums as places of exploration of “ways of showing” while “creating an atmosphere” to induce active encounters rather than simple contemplation. reverent.

Located on Avenida Paulista de São Paulo, facing a dense urban park, the MASP site offered a view of the horizon even as it plunged into a ravine. A mandate to preserve the view inspired Bo Bardi to divide the museum into two structures – one nestled in the hill, its roof terrace at street level, the other a two-story glazed box held aloft. . In this raised volume, she lets her imagination fly, displaying pictures on staggered glass easels like aligned sentries. A canvas was to be experienced as if it were still in the artist’s studio, caught in the moment of creativity rather than embalmed on a museum wall. On either side, expanses of floor-to-ceiling glass framed a sweeping view of the treetops and the city.

When I visited MASP last July, the easels, stabilized with concrete blocks and wooden wedges, had been recreated by the local company Metro Arquitetos. The frames of each painting are screwed to the glass, with labels on the back of the glass so that reading can never interfere with viewing. The works are to be understood one by one, not as belonging to a movement or to a period. (Although, unless you literally have your nose on the canvas, the peripheral views of so many other rooms can be awkward.) Interestingly, what was originally an exit on the other end of the gallery in relation to the entrance is now reserved for emergencies, which means that visitors have the strange and unintentional experience of retracing their steps, looking at the rear of the collection, a retreating army. It’s a sight I never envisioned looking longingly at those old photographs, and it adds a whole new dimension to Lina Bo Bardi’s experience – an experience that has rarely been considered, in which, behind the scenes , the framing materials are as visible as the works themselves.

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torafu architects make jiro takamatsu: mystery exhibition design

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torafu architects set the scene for Jiro Takamatsu: Exhibition of Mysteries
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates
all photos from daici ano

in the conception of the scenography of the retrospective jiro takamatsu (1936-1998) at tokyo national museum of modern art, torafu architects wanted to create an elevated exhibition space that invited visitors to walk through its heritage.

curated by kenjiro hosaka, mika kuraya and tomohiro masuda, who oversaw the first, middle and last chapters in the Japanese artist’s life, torafu architects prepared a scene for the “mysteries” which presents the stylistically heterogeneous work of takamatsu in a way that brings forward the disruptive, yet at the same time playful, nature of his interventions – surrealism being a notable influence on his part.

visitors are welcomed to the exhibition with a “ghost laboratory”
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

the exhibition opens with a “shadow laboratory” which takes the form of a long and narrow interactive installation which highlights the middle part of his artistic practice. this area includes superimposed shadows cast by various light sources, such as the silhouette of a rotating chair, depicted through various themes.

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
shadow works were produced in the middle of jiro takamatsu’s career
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

Through this hall, visitors are led into the main exhibition space which is defined by six columns of varying circumference. these volumes are set up to give an architectural atmosphere to the gallery, while minimizing their presence as structural elements. Dotted across these main vertical supports, the architects of torafu installed five pseudo-pillars of the same width in their spacing, which are used as screens for the exhibition. these volumes of different sizes help define each thematic section of ‘mysteries’, which is achieved through their placement by filtering out adjacent areas.

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
six main columns architecturally define the gallery space
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

the final element of the exhibition design is a ‘stage’ located in the center of the space. this platform is characterized by wood accents reminiscent of the takamatsu workshop, which offers a vantage point from which the works on display can be viewed from a different perspective. Within the vertical barrier of the stage, quotes from the artist can be found, which recall the various themes he addressed throughout his creative practice. this scene is intended to serve as a rest area where visitors are invited to browse illustrated books, while seated on cushions that feature reproductions of his sketches which are from the latter part of his career. the dimensions of this architectural element reflect the dimensions of takamatsu’s workshop, where he actively worked.

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
the “scene” measures the same dimensions as jiro takamatsu’s studio where he actively worked
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

‘mysteries’ features around 200 works by jiro takamatsu, which are presented in a way that allows visitors to experience his philosophical world, while trying to resolve the elusiveness that is expressed in his art.

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
the “stage” offers a place where visitors can rest
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
general view of the exhibition
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
the stage is bordered by a low wall
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
jiro takamatsu: exhibition of mysteries at the national museum of modern art in tokyo
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

torafu-architects-jiro-takamatsu-exhibition-designboom-
image © the estate of jiro takamatsu, courtesy of yumiko chiba associates

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2014 exhibition design selection | Design week

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Danish National Maritime Museum, by Kossmann.dejong

Kossman.dejong created the Danish National Maritime Museum exhibits in an underground space surrounded by a former dry dock. The galleries have irregular shapes, with continuously sloping floors and ceilings. The narrow spaces are used to evoke the oppressive atmosphere of wartime, while the wider and open spaces evoke the sea or contemporary globalization. The exhibition also uses 3D film installations and portholes transformed into showcases.

Masterpieces of Chinese Painting 700-1900 for the Victoria & Albert Museum, by Stanton Williams

The V&A exhibition brings together the finest examples of Chinese paintings from a period of 1200 years. The design had to cater for two main types of artwork: hanging scrolls displayed vertically and manual scrolls displayed horizontally. Some rolls were up to 15m long when laid out. Long horizontal display cases accommodated manual scrolls, while vertical display cases were integrated into the walls. The exhibition also aimed to evoke Chinese architecture through the use of courtyards, thresholds and views through the rooms.

Wonderkamers 2.0 for Gemeentemuseum The Hague, by Kossman.dejong

Wonderkamers at the Gemeentemuseum in The Hague, The Netherlands, is designed as an exhibition specifically aimed at teenagers. Kossmann.dejong updated the design he originally created in 2005. The revamped Wonderkamers exhibit is designed as a physical and virtual 3D game. Each room is designed around a specific theme, and the Miniature Museum centerpiece allows kids to design their own virtual museum room, using hundreds of miniature works of art by international artists.

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Q&A with Exhibition Design Director James Alexander

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This is the centenary year of the Titanic’s maiden voyage and to commemorate the glory and tragedy of the cursed ship, the world’s largest exhibition has opened in the city where it was built.

“It’s not a simple case of Belfast building a ship and the ship sinks, it’s a story about the people who built the ship.”

Titanic Belfast was designed to tell the story of not just a ship that sank, but a time and place where shipbuilding was rife and the economy healthy.

The three-dimensional space traces the growth of the Harland and Wolff Shipyard, the lives and times of the people who built the Titanic and the passengers who sailed on it.

James Alexander, CEO of exhibition design consultancy Event Communications, tells designbuild-network how his team took over Edwardian Belfast and the story of the world’s most famous passenger liner, and how they created an environment that resonates with various audiences around the world.

What prompted you to get involved in the Titanic Belfast project?

Jacques Alexandre: I think the fact that it’s Titanic makes it pretty special.

I think doing something on the Titanic in Belfast, which of course is where the Titanic was built, is pretty special too.

There are other Titanic exhibits that have opened recently – one in Southampton for example – but there is something about developing a Titanic story in your hometown.

It was always going to be very attractive. One hundred years ago Belfast was a very important city. In fact, it was one of the most important cities in the Commonwealth and was comparable to Liverpool and Glasgow in terms of shipbuilding.

How is this particular project different from your previous exhibition designs?

Titanic Belfast

Event Communications has recreated the interior spaces of the Titanic using modern materials. Image courtesy of Titanic Belfast.


JA: It did not differ greatly. Our job as exhibition designers is to deliver stories and narratives – that’s what we do for a living, so in this case it was the story of Belfast and the Titanic.

How did you create a space that tells the story of the Titanic while creating a visual representation of the liner?

JA: It’s called the Titanic Exhibition, but in fact we also tell the story of Belfast. So we were wrapping a larger story around the ship, giving it a broader base of interest.

There are nine galleries and we have created in each of those galleries a narrative that unfolds chronologically, so when you enter the first gallery you enter Edwardian Belfast and the streets of the city and you travel through these streets, which illustrate what it was. be in Belfast at that time.

Then, you go through the design offices, the shipyard, the launching, the fitting out, then after the sinking of the Titanic, we advance the chronology towards the question of myths and legends and the discovery of the ship in the 1980s.

What materials did you use to mimic the original interior design?

JA: All kinds. One of the things about this project is that not 100 years ago it is not a huge amount of time and the records of the Titanic and its sister ships, the Olympic and the Britannic , all exist.

“Our job as exhibition designers is to deliver stories and narratives – that’s what we do for a living, so in this case it was the story of Belfast and the Titanic.”

So we recreated, in several ways, the interior spaces that include three scale models of the first class, second class and third class cabins, and we had enough detail to be able to do it very precisely.

We also created what we call a 3D cave, which people can enter and take a trip through the Titanic, from the boiler rooms to the Captain’s Bridge. With all these things we have used modern technologies and modern materials, but they are based on the reality of the designs of the first decade of the 20th century.

We don’t have a lot of collections of objects like in a museum, so we have to create immersive environments using moving and still images and we project this on a large scale to give a sense of presence. We also have a ride, which takes people through the shipyard as the Titanic is being built in different stages, such as the laying of the keel through to the plating and riveting process.

Did you feel under pressure while designing this exhibit, knowing the tragedy behind the Titanic and the number of lives it touched?

JA: I do not think so. Obviously it was a tragedy, but it is a well understood tragedy and I think a lot of what we are dealing with may have tragic elements. For example, we worked on the Imperial War Museum.

I think what we were very aware of was making sure that when we tell the story, people engage in it emotionally, on all kinds of different levels. It’s not a simple case where Belfast built a ship and the ship sank, it’s a story about the people who built the ship. This is the very personal history of Belfast and if you go to the Titanic exhibit what you will see is a huge effort to unravel personal and human histories and it is very, very important, because people s ‘identify with people.

We were certainly aware that we fully understood the facts, but I wouldn’t say we were worried because most of our clients are museums and when working with museums you can’t go wrong.

How did you decide which elements of the ship to include in your design and which individual stories to tell?

“There are nine galleries and in each of those galleries we have created a story that unfolds chronologically.”

JA: What we did at the start of the process was write a narrative for the exhibit and as that developed we made appropriate judgments about which part of the ship, or process, we wanted to highlight.

So in the journey, where we illustrate the construction process, we created part of the Arrol portico, which is the scaffolding in which the titanic sat during its construction.

But, as far as the layout of the components goes, this is where we have reconstructions of the cabins, for example, so it depended on how the story unfolded.

How long did it take you to research the Titanic to make sure the content of the exhibit was fact-based?

JA: We started in 2004, so we’ve been working on it for quite some time and of course it intensified during the design process. In Belfast there is a Titanic company that involves family members of the passengers and we have spoken to these people, but we have also set up an ‘expert group’ to help us make sure that the stories we we had were factually correct.

What were the main challenges you encountered during the project?

The legendary Titanic ship

Titanic Belfast was designed to tell the story of not just a ship that sank, but a time and place where shipbuilding was rife and the economy healthy.


JA: The timescale was the main challenge. Although we had been working on the project since 2004, it only got the green light in 2010, so once we finally got the green light, there was a lot to do. It took so long because we started by doing various feasibility studies plus the total cost of the project is £ 97million and collecting that kind of money took a while.

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