Exhibition histories – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 14:40:26 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://expo-monet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-63-120x120.png Exhibition histories – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ 32 32 JOAN KEE ON AFRO-ATLANTIC STORIES https://expo-monet.com/joan-kee-on-afro-atlantic-stories/ Wed, 01 Dec 2021 05:02:38 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/joan-kee-on-afro-atlantic-stories/ Photo: Brian J. Green. Inspired by Oswald de Andrade’s “Antropófago Manifesto” (Manifeste anthropophage) from 1928 and what one might call the ethics of cannibalism, Afro-Atlantic stories (DelMonico Books), edited by Adriano Pedrosa and Tomás Toledo, embraces the art of the four continents to reject the “canned conscience” that Andrade deplored as the scourge of life. […]]]>

Inspired by Oswald de Andrade’s “Antropófago Manifesto” (Manifeste anthropophage) from 1928 and what one might call the ethics of cannibalism, Afro-Atlantic stories (DelMonico Books), edited by Adriano Pedrosa and Tomás Toledo, embraces the art of the four continents to reject the “canned conscience” that Andrade deplored as the scourge of life. Considerably revised since its initial manifestation as a publication accompanying the 2018 exhibition of the same name (organized by the Museu de Arte de São Paulo and the Instituto Tomie Ohtake and which will soon embark on an ambitious tour of the United States), Afro-Atlantic stories breathes new life into comparative research, demonstrating that side-by-side comparison can reveal a spirit of camaraderie rather than competition. Boasting a striking array of juxtapositions, including Victor Meirelles ‘portrait of conductor Henrique Alves de Mesquita in 1862 alongside Barkley L. Hendricks’ portrait of George Jules Taylor in 1972, the book traverses the silos of studies ethnic, cultural and regional to get closer to the geometry of a real and imagined movement in which the works of art overlap. As you would expect from any multi-author volume, the essays inside are spotty; we look forward to what readers will do with the cumulative product: a feast of images and ideas that resolutely moves away from stories that invariably prioritize portrayal and the author’s intention rather than to the apparent sensitivity of works of art crossing multiple historical, cultural and political settings. Borrowing from Paul Gilroy’s construction of a “black Atlantic” while also recognizing the survivals of slavery, Afro-Atlantic stories takes up the challenges of so-called global modernism by boldly laying down the conditions for an art history that is for, rather than against, a global majority – a majority with which existing institutional structures are just beginning to reckon.

Joan Kee is professor of art history at the University of Michigan and contributing editor to Art forum. She is currently working on a book project called The geometries of Afro-Asia.


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7 essential Pop Art stories – ARTnews.com https://expo-monet.com/7-essential-pop-art-stories-artnews-com/ https://expo-monet.com/7-essential-pop-art-stories-artnews-com/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 16:57:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/7-essential-pop-art-stories-artnews-com/ If you purchase an independently rated product or service through a link on our website, we may receive an affiliate commission. Mention Pop Art, and Andy Warhol usually comes to mind. Warhol brought glitz and glamor to an early 1960s New York art world tired of the austere vibes of Abstract Expressionism, but he did […]]]>

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Mention Pop Art, and Andy Warhol usually comes to mind. Warhol brought glitz and glamor to an early 1960s New York art world tired of the austere vibes of Abstract Expressionism, but he did not invent Pop Art; in fact, his first works in this vein are subsequent to those of Roy Lichtenstein. Even then, no artist could claim the genre; he was not born in New York but in post-war London, where a group of artists considered the possibilities of using pop cultural references in art. One of them, Richard Hamilton, produced what is arguably the first example of the style in 1956: a collage of advertising images centered on a bodybuilder holding a Tootsie Pop. But Hamilton’s play also underscored Pop Art’s deeper roots in the early 20th century, when Picasso and Braque designed the papier collé and Duchamp pushed the technique to its logical conclusion with his Readymades. Ultimately, Pop Art, as we understand it, arose out of the Cold War competition between communism and capitalism, and the consumer culture that the latter spread throughout the West – a development reflected by Pop Art which has also spread around the world. You’ll find this story, and more, in our list of the best Pop Art books. (Price and availability in effect at the time of publication.)

1. Lawrence Alloway, American Pop Art
Published in 1974 to accompany a group exhibition at the Whitney Museum featuring Jasper Johns, Roy Lichtenstein, Claes Oldenburg, Robert Rauschenberg, Larry Rivers and Andy Warhol, this book by British author Lawrence Alloway is one of the fundamental evaluations of Pop Art, a label he claimed for minting. Indeed, it has helped shape the genre in more ways than one. He participated, for example, in the organization of the ur-Pop Art exhibition entitled “This Is Tomorrow” at the Whitechapel Gallery in London in 1956, which claimed that in the information age, art contemporary would inevitably draw inspiration from popular culture. Thanks to the emergence of Pop Art in America, this proposition came to fruition in work that transformed the signs and symbols of the consumer society – the brands, cinema icons and comics that defined what Alloway describes it as “the twentieth century communications network that we’re all a part of” —in fine art.
To buy: American Pop Art from $ 5.95 (used) on abebooks.com

2. Lucy R. Lippard, Pop Art
Because it was visually as alluring as the mass culture from which it borrowed, Pop Art garnered tremendous media attention while propelling the New York art market to dizzying heights. This sparked a reaction – in the form of minimalism and concept art – from a downtown art scene that still believed in the corrupting influence of commerce on art (which seems odd today). In this context, Lucy R. Lippard published her History of Pop Art in 1966. With contributions from the aforementioned Alloway, as well as critics Nancy Marmer and Nicolas Calas, the book chronicles the twin births of Pop Art in the UK and the United Kingdom. United States. and its subsequent penetration into Canada and Europe. By writing that “Pop Art itself was not the product of [the] the disco era, but its reception was, ”notes Lippard how the movement’s broad appeal to people inside and outside the art world reflected the mid-century vibe .
To buy: Pop Art from $ 12.40 (used) on abebooks.com

3. Hal Foster, The Early Pop Age: Painting and Subjectivity in the Art of Hamilton, Lichtenstein, Warhol, Richter and Ruscha
What was the magnitude of the impact of Pop Art on society? Huge, according to critic and historian Hal Foster, who argues that the “early pop age,” as he calls it, transformed the human condition and the nature of subjectivity. According to Foster’s calculation, Pop Art heralded the start of an era in which everything and everyone would be subsumed by the operations of late capitalism, a result we can see today in the global social media runaway. Foster divides his book into chapters devoted to five key figures in the development of Pop Art – Richard Hamilton, Roy Lichtenstein, Andy Warhol, Gerhard Richter, and Ed Ruscha – offering insight into each. Lichtenstein’s Ben-Day dot paintings, for example, depict a “critical redoubling of living conditions in consumer capitalism,” while Warhol’s work reflects his concern for death and self-image-making. as a means of postponing it. Richter, meanwhile, seeks beauty and moral clarity while also acknowledging that both are impossible to achieve. Overall, Foster’s book convincingly demonstrates that Pop Art is more relevant than ever.
Purchase: The First Pop Age $ 30.95 (new) on Amazon

4. Darsie Alexander et al., International pop
Over the years, the history of Pop Art has evolved to adopt a less New York-centric view, allowing, for example, England to give birth to the movement, which then took hold in America and the continent. . Less well-known is that Pop Art has also been adopted by artists more widely across the world, a phenomenon ultimately given its due in International pop. Spanning the 1950s to 1970s, the book includes names – Raymundo Colares, Keiichi Tanaami, Nelson Leirner – unknown to the American public as well as others – Jasper Johns, Yayoi Kusama, Andy Warhol – who are widely recognized. The book shows how Pop Art has been assimilated according to the specific cultural, historical, economic and political conditions of a given country. In Brazil, for example, it manifested itself as a form of political protest against the military junta which took power in 1964. In recounting the global reach of the movement, International pop reveals that there is still a lot to learn about it.
Buy: International Pop from $ 106.30 (used) on Amazon

5. Mark Godfrey et al., Living with pop: a reproduction of capitalist realism
Despite its name, Capitalist Realism was not so much a movement as it was a collaborative art project that encompassed several exhibitions-slash-performances in West Germany from the early to mid-1960s. Among its principals, Manfred Kuttner, Konrad Lueg, Sigmar Polke and Gerhard Richter, two have become extremely famous, which is why this epiphenomenon of art history has aroused so much interest. This book originally accompanied an exhibition of the same name, which opened at Kunsthalle Düsseldorf in 2013 before traveling to the nonprofit Artists Space in New York the following year. The book delves into the origins of capitalist realism as an ironic response to both American Pop Art and the auto-mythological and artistic tendencies of the Fluxus aesthetic associated with Joseph Beuys. But for all its ironies, capitalist realism was extremely serious in its critique of American soft power and postwar Germany’s attempt to escape its Nazi past through the numbing comforts of consumerism. All in all, this is a vital recap of a fascinating chapter in postmodernism.
To buy: Living with Pop $ 45.00 (new) on artbook.com

6. Kaira M. Cabañas, The Myth of New Realism: Art and the Performative in Postwar France
Nouveau Réalisme is often referred to as French Pop Art, a comparison that doesn’t really take into account its distancing from the corporate cool of Warhol, Lichtenstein, et al. The finesse of American Pop Art matched the fortunes of a country whose infrastructure had remained intact after World War II, while the relatively crude qualities of New Realism evoked a less fortunate Europe. But according to the revisionist story of Kaira M. Cabañas, New Realism was not so much a movement as a heterogeneous band of artists – Yves Klein, Jacques Villeglé, Jean Tinguely – grouped under this heading by the critic Pierre Restany. For Restany, New Realism is defined by ready-made appropriations of consumerist and technological culture. But Cabañas argues that his disparate strains actually shared a tendency towards “performative realism,” in which actions (Klein’s Jump into the void; Tinguely’s self-immolating and kinetic sculptures) are as important as the objects. His book offers a fresh look at an often overlooked movement.
Purchase: The Myth of New Realism $ 31.99 (new) on Amazon

7. Sid Sachs, Kalliopi Minioudaki, Seductive Subversion: Female Pop Artists 1958-1968
Women artists have been overlooked throughout art history, and this is certainly the case with the women associated with Pop Art in the 1960s. They and their considerable achievements have been revisited in the traveling exhibition of 2011 “Seductive Subversion: Women Pop Artists 1958-1968”, curated by Sid Sachs, a curator and writer renowned for resurrecting neglected careers. The show’s catalog, which Sachs co-edited with Kalliopi Minioudaki, goes no less deep into re-evaluating female pop artists who have been completely ignored or who have gained notoriety before being forgotten. Some of them were fired because the artists themselves were considered too good-looking (surprising when you consider that this is practically a prerequisite today); others have had their ideas scammed by male colleagues. The list of artists covered ranges from those who are now known (Yayoi Kusama) to solid mid-career figures (Faith Ringgold, Martha Rosler) to artists who, until this show, were lost in time (Rosalyn Drexler, Patty Mucha).
Purchase: Alluring Subversion from $ 135.21 (used) on Amazon


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New clothing exhibition – “Preserve & Protect” – to reveal our “veiled stories” https://expo-monet.com/new-clothing-exhibition-preserve-protect-to-reveal-our-veiled-stories/ https://expo-monet.com/new-clothing-exhibition-preserve-protect-to-reveal-our-veiled-stories/#respond Mon, 01 Nov 2021 16:27:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/new-clothing-exhibition-preserve-protect-to-reveal-our-veiled-stories/ Through Brian dunn APSU, Contributed November 1, 2021 11:27 AM CLARKSVILLE, TN – Austin Peay State University’s new gallery, with support from the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts and the Department of Art and Design, is pleased to present Preserve & Protect to continue an engaging 2021-22 exhibition season. Co-curated by Michael Dickins, […]]]>

CLARKSVILLE, TN – Austin Peay State University’s new gallery, with support from the Center of Excellence for the Creative Arts and the Department of Art and Design, is pleased to present Preserve & Protect to continue an engaging 2021-22 exhibition season.

Co-curated by Michael Dickins, director of The New Gallery, and Erika Diamond, curator and deputy director of CVA galleries at the Chautauqua Institution, this exhibition of conceptual work on clothing examines the complex ways in which textiles, particularly clothing , tell the stories of the past, present and future. More than just armor for the body, they relay the resilience of a culture – worn as protection but also as a means of proclaiming its identity.

“Textiles are used to protect us, to tell our stories and to display our privilege,” said Diamond. “Through recognizable structures in historical fashion and strategic embellishments, these textiles recontextualize and affirm wrapped stories. They assert the value of the lives lost because of the lingering ideals of colonialism, bigotry and unequal power structures. They reveal competing stories and ask for a better future.

The exhibition includes works by Michael Sylvan Robinson, Paul Rucker, Stephanie Syjuco, Winnie van der Rijn and Anangookwe Wolf.

Their works “testify and challenge our common American history,” said Diamond. “They wonder what stories have had the privilege of being heard. They ask for a more inclusive fatherhood of our common history. Together, they represent an army of truths. Are we going to answer this call to arms and start protecting each other, listening to each other’s stories, and sharing our abundance of resources? ”

The exhibition opens Monday, November 1 and will run through December 10 at the new gallery, located in the Art + Design building on the Austin Peay campus.

“Art often challenges our conventions and beliefs, and sometimes looking at artwork can be uncomfortable,” Dickins said. “The works in this exhibition can be triggering for some. It is important that our visitors are aware of this before entering the exhibition. But we invite everyone to join us in this conversation.

Several events accompany the exhibition:

  • Diamond will be giving a curatorial talk at 6 p.m. on November 1 in Room 106 A / B at the Sundquist Science Complex. This event is in person but will also be broadcast live, courtesy of CECA. You can subscribe to the live broadcast at this link.
  • A talk with Diamond and Dickins will take place at 12:15 p.m. on November 2 in the new gallery.
  • Exhibiting artist Paul Rucker will visit campus to give an artist talk on his work and creative practice at 6 p.m. on November 9 in Room 106 A / B at the Sundquist Science Complex. This event is live, but will also be broadcast live, courtesy of CECA. You can subscribe to the live broadcast at this link.

This exhibition will be open during the next two Art Walks on Clarksville’s First Thursday from 5 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. on November 4 and December 2. All events are free and open to the public.

A virtual tour of the exhibition will soon be available on www.apsu.edu/art-design/thenewgallery. The opening hours of the new gallery are 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Monday to Friday, closed on weekends and holidays, and follow the university’s academic calendar.

For more information on this exhibition, which is free and open to the public, contact Dickins at dickinsm@apsu.edu.


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“Art Stories Are Being Rewritten”: Métis Artist Jason Baerg Brings Extensive Work to Art Toronto https://expo-monet.com/art-stories-are-being-rewritten-metis-artist-jason-baerg-brings-extensive-work-to-art-toronto/ https://expo-monet.com/art-stories-are-being-rewritten-metis-artist-jason-baerg-brings-extensive-work-to-art-toronto/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 18:30:08 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/art-stories-are-being-rewritten-metis-artist-jason-baerg-brings-extensive-work-to-art-toronto/ Queeries is a weekly column by CBC Arts producer Peter Knegt that questions LGBTQ art, culture and / or identity through a personal lens. This weekend, Art Toronto – Canada’s only international art fair – will return to an in-person event after a year off, with over 60 galleries heading to the Metro Toronto Convention […]]]>

Queeries is a weekly column by CBC Arts producer Peter Knegt that questions LGBTQ art, culture and / or identity through a personal lens.

This weekend, Art Toronto – Canada’s only international art fair – will return to an in-person event after a year off, with over 60 galleries heading to the Metro Toronto Convention Center in addition to several virtual events. And with that comes a very busy weekend for Torontonians Jason Baerg. The queer Métis artist will exhibit with Vancouver FAZAKAS GALLERY in addition to presenting a preview solo exhibition of Art Toronto with Soho House Toronto.

Baerg, who works with digital interventions in drawing, painting, and new media installation (and notably also developed and implemented the National Métis Arts Program for the Vancouver Olympics), is part of a Focus on Indigenous art at this year’s Art Toronto, where over 10% of exhibitors are Indigenous-run galleries and about 25% of the entire fair will feature Indigenous artwork. We spoke to Baerg about his work and what people can expect to see at the fair.

Congratulations on Art Toronto and all the work you have presented there. Do you want to chat a bit about what people can expect from you at the fair?

Thank you Pierre!

As a pioneer in the use of manufacturing technologies in my art studio, laser cutting has been a key aspect of my practice since 2012. I will present new works that illustrate my interest in the advancement of painting by through digital interventions. Art Toronto receives a new large installation piece that pays homage to my spiritual name as well as the great Norval Morrisseau, who is a copper and red 9ft Thunderbird.

I have also created a new series of paintings and prints activating the same iconography, which will be seen both at Art Toronto and at the associated opening at Soho House in Toronto. Art Metropole will also carry my new catalog, Tawâskweyâw / A path or a hole among the trees, at the Publishing Fair, which will also take place at the Metro Convention Center during Art Toronto.

Ispisîhêw ᐃᐢᐱᓰᐦᐁᐤ S: He stands up. Acrylic on Wood. (Jason Baerg)

Can you tell us a bit about your career and how it has evolved in relation to what you are expressing?

“Broadening our way of seeing and being” is at the heart of my artistic practice. I am here to make a contribution to culture conceptually, as well as to advance my artistic discipline in a formal way. As I learn, I create and share, hoping the messages and visuals inspire others to move forward dynamically in our continuum.

The paths for many, including myself, have been part of this 25 year journey. It is a real job to be Métis, but I am grateful to stand in solidarity with my Indigenous parents, to support and celebrate our people, our cultures and our future. It’s not just about me; some of the ways I have illustrated my commitment to capacity building in our community in the past [have been] by co-founding The Shushkitew Collective and The Métis Artist Collective. I have also been a volunteer chair of organizations such as the Indigenous Curatorial Collective and the National Indigenous Media Arts Coalition. Teaching at OCADU is also an aspect of this process.

Times are changing and as indigenous people it is vital that we culturally participate in larger conversations to advance our ideas and offerings. I am delighted to be part of a large movement for recognition and inclusion beyond the expectation of what we should look like, where we should be seen or how we should make our art.

Jason Baerg laser cut piece. (Émile Askey)

This year, Art Toronto is focusing on Indigenous art, with over 10% of exhibitors being Indigenous-run galleries and over 25% of the entire fair showcasing Indigenous artwork. Does that give you any hope as to the direction in which we are heading to finally focus the work of aboriginal artists?

We’re just amazing, to be honest! I remember the first Indigenous art jury I sat on, in what was then called Indian and Northern Affairs, in 1998, and I was blown away by the exceptional level of talent offered by our Indigenous peoples from coast to coast to coast. Powerful. The art world has also been rocked to a point where social phobias and racism will no longer be tolerated. Art histories are being rewritten and the canon now includes contributions from all four directions from time immemorial.

It is undeniable that what was brought by ancestors of the past informed much of what has been called “modernism”; it only takes a visit to the Great Hall of Oceania at the MET in New York to realize this. In a contemporary art context, when you consider what the best Indigenous creators have to offer, POW! The deep goods are here and are delivered sizzling.

In the wake of the completion of the Anthropocene, the only culture that will matter is the one that leads us to safety and survival. Yes, systems are changing and settlers are beginning to understand that what we as Indigenous people have to offer is not only legitimate, but also necessary. The secrets of the earth are anchored in our languages, our knowledge and our practices. We need our dreamers, our visionaries, and that’s us, the artists.

A piece from Jason Baerg’s solo exhibition at Soho House. (Jason Baerg)

Can you talk about your own experience as an Indigenous queer artist and how it appears in your artistic practice?

What is a Queer Spirit or an offering? I have been taught that I am sacred, and traditionally some of the roles and responsibilities align with healing, seeing and helping. As a maker, it is possible to engender the aesthetic, because everything has a sensuality, and these guidelines are non-binary. Works of art can also be sensitive if the artist realizes that he can participate in the birth of something.

In fashion at Ayimach Horizons, I challenge myself to fold clothes into spaces that embrace dexterity in design. Most of the pieces are gender neutral and can be worn in a number of ways. The transformation / change of shape is at the heart of the brand.

A lot of people have told me that they find something sexual in certain works of art. I would do wrong to deny these energies the occasional infiltration of production. It is also one of the sophisticated windows of abstraction: it allows us to deliver codes to our audience in complete confidentiality.

This interview has been condensed.

Art Toronto will take place October 29-31 at the Metro Toronto Convention Center. Due to COVID-19 protocols, tickets must be booked in advance online and scheduled in half-hour increments. Festival visitors must also show proof of full COVID-19 vaccination.



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Haunting stories and otherworldly experiences are on display at the Speed ​​Art Museum – 89.3 WFPL News Louisville https://expo-monet.com/haunting-stories-and-otherworldly-experiences-are-on-display-at-the-speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museum-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/ https://expo-monet.com/haunting-stories-and-otherworldly-experiences-are-on-display-at-the-speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museum-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 14:01:38 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/haunting-stories-and-otherworldly-experiences-are-on-display-at-the-speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museum-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/ Walking through the exhibition, footsteps echo in the room. Art is everywhere: the walls, the floor, suspended from above. The air is heavy in the galleries of the Speed ​​Art Museum. There is energy circulating in space. Go from room to room, swirling to fill the rooms. The tension around Supernatural America: The Paranormal in […]]]>

Walking through the exhibition, footsteps echo in the room. Art is everywhere: the walls, the floor, suspended from above.

The air is heavy in the galleries of the Speed ​​Art Museum. There is energy circulating in space. Go from room to room, swirling to fill the rooms.

The tension around Supernatural America: The Paranormal in America Art isn’t surprising, given its name.

“The works in this exhibition, put together, have a very different intentionality, and you feel it,” said Erika Holmquist-Wall, Curator of European and American Painting and Sculpture. “They are imbued with an energy.”

This intentionality crosses two floors. With works spanning 250 years, this is the largest exhibition Speed ​​has ever hosted.

“It’s an exhibit I’ve really had my eye on for over five years,” said Holmquist-Wall.

He is originally from the Minneapolis Institute of Art.

Grounding forces

The huge screen is divided between two main themes. The lower floor explores America as a haunted place.

Holmquist-Wall said this part of the exhibit focuses on the stories and haunted landscapes of the United States. She confronts the ghosts of the past that continue to affect the present.

Visitors to the exhibition were particularly interested in the multimedia works and two pieces in particular.

The first is a reconstruction of a living room by Whitfield lovell.

“The piece is made of wood reclaimed from the Jackson neighborhood in Richmond, Virginia, which was the first successful black entrepreneurial neighborhood after the Civil War, ”said Holmquist-Wall.

The room is frozen in an instant. There are plates on the table, mail at a desk, and keys by the door.

The recreated living room goes beyond visual engagement to include an audio element that evokes the people and sounds of the era.

On the wall, ghostly figures of the people who may have inhabited this space are painted, but to achieve the full effect visitors have to move around the space.

A man watches visitors move through the recreated lounge from the walls.

Near the organ on one side of the room the sound of a gospel song can be heard, but moving to the other side the sound turns into someone reading the names and addresses of the locals by Jackson Ward.

“This piece, in particular, is incredibly powerful,” said Ashely Giron, who attended the opening of the exhibition. “This is a great opportunity to remind ourselves that there are many very interesting spiritual connections to the lands and culture of America.”

Directly across from the room is a room that spans an entire wall, nearly 15 feet in diameter.

Fates manifest through John Jota Leanos is a seven-minute video that challenges the concept of manifest fate, the idea that it was divine will for the United States to expand west.

John Jota Leanos. American (Xicano-Mestizo), born in 1969. Destinies Manifest, 2017. Digital animation, installation, 7 minutes. Commissioned by the Denver Art Museum. Courtesy of the artist, John Jota Leaños. Photos: Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico. © John Jota Leaños.

“You have this kind of famous folk art painting where you had this cute blonde 19th century angel flying a bit in the sky guiding the Conestoga carts across the border to the west, but what happens is she becomes the Angel of Death ” , said Holmquist-Wall.

John Jota Leanos. American (Xicano-Mestizo), born in 1969. Destinies Manifest, 2017. Digital animation, installation, 7 minutes. Commissioned by the Denver Art Museum. Courtesy of the artist, John Jota Leaños. Photos: Blue Rain Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico. © John Jota Leaños.

The video then describes the borders that cross the native lands and the destruction of their space. A buffalo crosses the screen, reminding viewers of the freedom the landscape once had.

“We were just having a conversation about, you know, the state of our indigenous people and how the land was taken from them,” Kirby Coleman said after watching the video on the first night of the exhibit.

He said he was delighted to see how the artwork confronts the racist, violent and colonial past of the United States from the perspective of those most affected by it.

Passing from the first floor to the second, the theme literally rises in the spirit world.

“America as a haunted place is kind of dry land below, and upstairs you take the stairs or the elevator, you’re in the spirit world,” said Holmquist-Wall.

Ascension, challenge of understanding

On this floor, the artists explore the afterlife, the occult and even the extraterrestrial.

Moving across the second floor, the murmur of voices intensified until at Tony Oursler “Dust” may be seen.

Tony Oursler. American, born 1957 Dust, from Thought Forms, 2006. Fiberglass sculpture, Haron Kardon HS100 5.1 audio system, Sony XGA VPL-PX41 projector, 2 Sanyo PLC-XU48 projectors, 3 DVD players, 6 DVDs and 3 master tapes , 72 × 72 × 72 inches. The Broad Art Foundation, Los Angeles CA, F-Ours-1S06.05. Photo: Courtesy of Tony Oursler. © Tony Oursler.

It’s a huge cloud coming down from the ceiling; parts of the body are projected on it: eyes, ears and mouth. Voices and noises overlap.

“This piece really explores the idea that what’s going on around us, we’re all made up of dust,” said Holmquist-Wall. “We are just made up of the essence of everything.”

The last part of the exhibition leaves Earth completely to explore alternate universes and the extraterrestrial.

Images of UFOs and non-terrestrial creatures line the walls.

There is a piece, The Thanaton III through Paul Laffoley, on the wall that claims to be a portal to another world. All you have to do is place one hand on the past, one on the future, and look into the present eye.

Paul Laffoley. American, 1935-2015 The Thanaton III, 1989. Oil, acrylic, ink and hand-applied vinyl lettering on canvas; painted wood frame, 73 1/2 × 73 1/2 in. Private collection, courtesy of Kent Fine Art, New York, NY Photo: Kent Fine Art.

However, there is a sign next to this room warning you not to touch. Speed ​​doesn’t want anyone to travel interdimensionally or visit distant planets under their watch.

This is part of the exhibit that Holmquist-Wall finds most difficult to accept. The ghosts and spirits she can endure more easily, but the challenges of coming to terms with the UFO and alien experience remind her of the take-out food she hopes people will leave with.

“I cannot ignore someone else’s experience, whether it is an experience that they have personally had and that they are trying to articulate and draw or paint or d ‘express,’ said Holmquist-Wall. “Who are we, who are we to judge this?”

Supernatural America: The Paranormal in America Art will be on display at the Speed ​​Art Museum until January 2022.


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https://expo-monet.com/haunting-stories-and-otherworldly-experiences-are-on-display-at-the-speed-%e2%80%8b%e2%80%8bart-museum-89-3-wfpl-news-louisville/feed/ 0
The Crocker exhibit examines California’s little-known stories https://expo-monet.com/the-crocker-exhibit-examines-californias-little-known-stories/ https://expo-monet.com/the-crocker-exhibit-examines-californias-little-known-stories/#respond Thu, 28 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-crocker-exhibit-examines-californias-little-known-stories/ The Crocker Art Museum announces Towns, Trains, and Terrain: Early California Prints from the Pope Collection, an exhibition of over 80 works that showcase details of life in the Golden State through printmaking techniques including etching, etching and lithography, October 31 through January 30, 2022. Towns, Trains, and Terrain examines the history of California through […]]]>

The Crocker Art Museum announces Towns, Trains, and Terrain: Early California Prints from the Pope Collection, an exhibition of over 80 works that showcase details of life in the Golden State through printmaking techniques including etching, etching and lithography, October 31 through January 30, 2022.

Towns, Trains, and Terrain examines the history of California through rare historical maps, depictions of Gold Rush towns, urban scenes of San Francisco, and other aspects of daily life. Scenes of the city show urban development, aerial views, social gatherings, cartoons of well-known industrialists and the destruction caused by the earthquakes of 1865 and 1906. Trains play a central role in many works, which focus on both the literal construction of the railway and the idea of ​​a train as a link between people and industry. Through almost any artwork, from cartoons to cartography, visitors will see the evolution of the California landscape over several periods of growth and development.

The museum’s presentation will actively address the little-known tales of the immigrants and immigrant labor force that accompanied the boom in the Gold Rush, the influx of settlers to the region, and the forced relocation of Native American populations as well as increased demand and use of the land’s environmental resources.

“The work invites an examination of the realities of California history,” said associate curator Jayme Yahr. “We believe it is important to bring forward various accounts related to these historical images in order to thwart the often lauded view of Western expansion.”

Towns, trains and terrain will also illustrate printmaking activity in the 1800s. Featuring artists, designers and printmaking companies including Edward Jump, Currier & Ives, Charles Braddock Gifford, the Nahl brothers and Britton & Rey, the exhibition gives visitors a better understanding of the intersections of art, current affairs and popular culture and how information has been disseminated over time.

The exhibition is based on a recent donation of 200 prints and original works on paper from the Peter T. Pope Early California Collection. The acquisition places the museum’s collection of these early works on paper on par with those of the National Gallery of Art and the Fine Arts Museums in San Francisco.

“The Pope Collection seamlessly connects two of the museum’s main collecting areas: ancient California art and works on paper,” said Lial Jones, director and CEO of Crocker’s Mort and Marcy Friedman. “While we consider these engravings to be historic today, they were contemporary when they were made. They provide an excellent record of the visual history of the state and we are delighted that the Pope family has entrusted the Crocker to take care of them and share them with the public for generations to come.

“Growing up in a family that arrived in California in 1849 to provide wood for gold miners, these coins collected over many years by my grandfather have become a daily part of my life working in the offices where they have been. hung up for decades, ”said Maria Pope, daughter of Peter T. Pope. “But even though they were part of my family history, they tell the story of California – and the Crocker Art Museum is the perfect steward. Our family’s hope is that Californians can experience these works as intimately as we do and see the history of their great state through the sketches and photos of those who have chronicled a truly transformational time.

In addition to the artwork donated, Maria Pope provided funds to digitize the entire collection. When completed, this broad overview of California history will be readily available online for researchers, educators, students, and the general public, statewide and beyond.

Events and programs

• November 21: Conversations that count: monuments and statues

• December 12: Classical concert series: Geirprúõur Anna Guõmundsdóttir, cello, and Luis Ortiz, piano

• December 19: Conversations That Matter: Asian American Stories

For details on these programs and all upcoming Crocker events and activities, visit crockerart.org/calendar. The Crocker Art Museum is located at 216 O St. in Sacramento. For more information, call (916) 808-7000 or visit crockerart.org.


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Stories of the Art of Eternal War – Announcements https://expo-monet.com/stories-of-the-art-of-eternal-war-announcements/ https://expo-monet.com/stories-of-the-art-of-eternal-war-announcements/#respond Sun, 24 Oct 2021 04:17:33 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/stories-of-the-art-of-eternal-war-announcements/ The Taipei Fine Arts Museum (TFAM) is delighted to present Stories of the Art of an Eternal War: Modernism between Space and Home. Faced with renewed geopolitical interests in Taiwan, technological wars and planetary crises that demand new shared global visions, the exhibition is a historical cartography of provocative art from the legacies of the […]]]>

The Taipei Fine Arts Museum (TFAM) is delighted to present Stories of the Art of an Eternal War: Modernism between Space and Home.

Faced with renewed geopolitical interests in Taiwan, technological wars and planetary crises that demand new shared global visions, the exhibition is a historical cartography of provocative art from the legacies of the Cold War in the contemporary. Based on a research project by guest curators Kathleen Ditzig and Hsu Fang-Tze, it constellates the development of modern art in Taiwan within the framework of a global history and poses the urgent question: in an increasingly divided world , can art fill the gaps in history and geopolitics?

Art stories of an eternal war presents canonical modern artwork from TFAM’s permanent collection by Chen Chi-Kuan, Chen Ting-Shih, Chin Sung, Han Hsiang-Ning, Hsia Yan, Hsiao Chin, Lee Shi-Chi, Liu Kuo-Sung, Li Yuan-Chia, Long Chinsan, Shaih Lifa, Yang Yuyu and Yen Shui-Long.

The exhibition also features works by Cho Chung-Yung, Ma Shou-Hua, Ran In-Ting and Wang Da-Hong; historical material on loan from archives, libraries and museums in Taiwan and around the world; and contemporary works by Erika Tan (Singapore / United Kingdom), Sung Tieu (Vietnam / Germany), Maria Taniguchi (Philippines), Chen Yin-Ju (Taiwan), Prajakta Potnis (India), Aya Rodriguez-Izumi (Okinawa / United States), Doris Wong Wai Yin (Hong Kong), Yee I-Lann (Borneo), Writing FACTory (Taiwan) in collaboration with Joy Ho (Singapore) and Joanne Ho (Singapore).

Addressing the complexity of a global history, the exhibition is organized around three themes: “Cosmotechnics after the space race”, “The global maid” and “The aesthetic networks of the free world”. Focusing on how the 1969 moon landing inspired modern artists, “Cosmotechnics after the Space Race” brings together works that not only celebrated the moon landing, but also recorded a philosophical and perspective shift in it. Chinese modern art. Presented in dialogue and thus pointing to a lasting cosmic imagination, the installation of Chen Yin-Ju Extrastellar assessments (2016) poses a speculative historiography of the 1960s.

“Global Domestic” features crystals engraved with works of modern Taiwanese artists, material on the international circulation of Taiwanese crafts, and works of art that extrapolate the modern home as the facade of an ideological homeland. Yee I-Lann’s The Tinukad Sequence 02 (2021), a large bamboo carpet woven by indigenous weavers of Sabah and Maria Taniguchi Untitled (celestial engines) (2012), a video that celebrates the scintillating modern form of the jeepney, discursively raises compelling questions about the insidious neo-colonialism of modern art and design. Doris Wong Wai Yin Being dead will be our only shared identity (2016), made up of portraits of a mother wearing a gas mask, extends this investigation to domesticity. The vast installation of Erika Tan Barang-Barang (2021) speculatively imagines a meeting between four female artists: Dora Gordine, Georgetta Chen, Kim Lim and her mother, Fay Tan and reflects on the enduring historical entanglements between the objects we inherit and the art stories we write.

As the free face of China, the Republic of China in Taiwan represented one of the ideological front lines of the Cold War. “Aesthetic Networks of the Free World” reviews Taiwan’s modern artists and their development of an international language of modern Chinese art as they navigate the networks of countries aligned with the United States. Shown alongside, the installation of Prajakta Potnis Cooking debate (2014-) captures a persistent anxiety that has emerged from these networks. Installation by American-Okinawan artist Aya Rodriguez-Izumi Echoes of the last battle (2017–), inspired by an illustrated book by his father, and installations by Sung Tieu, Exposure to Havana syndrome, brain anatomy, coronal plane (Sample 1-12) (2021) and Songs for Unattended Objects (2018), reveal the psychic traces of the wars of the twentieth century.

Commissioned for the exhibition, New Earth No. 3069, by Joy Ho, Joanna Ho and Writing FACTory is a web-based graphic novel that chronicles an interstellar colonization expedition into a future without nations and led by a mega-corporation. A veiled account of the duplicate history of our contemporary world order, history imagines an alternative universe for modern art from the exhibition.


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“Afro-Atlantic Stories” traces art across an ocean at the Houston Museum of Fine Arts https://expo-monet.com/afro-atlantic-stories-traces-art-across-an-ocean-at-the-houston-museum-of-fine-arts/ https://expo-monet.com/afro-atlantic-stories-traces-art-across-an-ocean-at-the-houston-museum-of-fine-arts/#respond Fri, 22 Oct 2021 09:05:20 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/afro-atlantic-stories-traces-art-across-an-ocean-at-the-houston-museum-of-fine-arts/ Clearly, the visual arts reward those who are able to see works in person, as opposed to those who do their best with books – or, worse, the types of thumbnail images prevalent online. But the two pieces that create a gateway to “Afro-Atlantic Histories,” a new exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts in […]]]>

Clearly, the visual arts reward those who are able to see works in person, as opposed to those who do their best with books – or, worse, the types of thumbnail images prevalent online. But the two pieces that create a gateway to “Afro-Atlantic Histories,” a new exhibit at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, underscore the need to come together, and both also caught my eye online: “Os lui touros” (The Two Bulls), a tapestry from 300 years ago, and “Éramos as cinzas e agora somos o fogo” (We were the ashes and now we are fire) by Brazilian artist Maxwell Alexandre, from 2018.

Familiar with digital versions of images, I was nevertheless not prepared for the scope and scale of these two works, which do not weigh so much on the viewer as they invite slow and spatial contemplation. Each slows down time, prompting the viewer to stop for a moment before entering this challenging and wonderful exhibition that spans centuries of art depicting the African Diaspora resulting from the slave trade in North and South America. Both of these pieces are brimming with small visual details that feed into a larger whole. They would look imposing without the fact that they are so inviting. For two works of such a large size, both alert visitors that certain smaller details carry significant weight.

Throughout this exhibition, small touches attract attention. Alexander’s work includes 16 connected panels that depict various black experiences spanning a territory ranging from spiritual expression and solitary comfort to oppression and public unrest. Towards the end of the exhibition, Barkley L. Hendricks’ “George Jules Taylor”, a 1972 painting, offers a striking portrait with attention to smallness even when the canvas is imposing.

Hendricks’ very large painting captures his subject barefoot and clad in a cape, his feet suggesting a dance movement. The luminous oil figure is contrasted with a flat acrylic background, giving the piece a shine when the light is on.

“Afro-Atlantic Histories” has taken a fascinating path to Houston. The exhibition has its roots in an exhibition three years ago at the Museu de Arte in São Paulo, Brazil. Curator Adriano Pedrosa has selected more than 450 works from two galleries. Kanitra Fletcher of the MFAH attempted to take the show’s spirit of Pedrosa and reinvent it for Houston, where it is making its first North American appearance.

Pedrosa’s exhibit goes through “Afro-Atlantic Historiest,” but the exhibit has been modified to appeal to a more selectively regional audience. Fletcher worked with Pedrosa and MFAH Curator Alison de Lima Greene on “Afro-Atlantic Histories” before accepting a new job in Washington, DC, as Senior Curator of African-American and African-American Art. diasporic at the National Gallery. The exhibition will travel to the National Gallery next year after it closes here.

When: From Wednesday to Sunday until January 17

Or: Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 1001 Bissonnet

Details: $ 12 to $ 19; 713-639-7300, mfah.org


From cards to portraits

The arrangement of “Afro-Atlantic Histories” is brilliant for the way it skips the timeline in favor of the theme. “Maps and Margins” introduces visitors to the exhibition.

Pedrosa created a large-scale exhibition in Brazil to capture the extent of the slave trade on the culture of the Americas. For its North American tour, the exhibition remains linked to its origin while refocusing on this continent. A close connection between the two exhibitions is the use of “histórias”, a Portuguese term which, according to Pedrosa, does not have a clear English translation. “It encompasses fiction and non-fiction,” he says. “It can be personal or political, historical or fictional, micro or macro. “

Fletcher was involved in transferring this concept to a North American audience. “We wanted to redesign it for audiences in Houston but also across North America,” says Fletcher, “representing artists who bring different perspectives to a long history.”

Fletcher highlights “Plan and Sections of a Slave Ship” by James Phillips Cornwall, a cold, clinical drawing of a ship’s interior space that would be a motif throughout many works from start to finish of the exhibition. A self-portrait photograph of Nona Faustina places the nude artist on a block of wood to piece together auctions that took place in New York City centuries ago. Among the points that the photographer wishes to convey: The North was, at least for a time, as complicit as the South in the slave trade.

Gary Tinterow, director of the MFAH, describes the exhibition’s journey as “painful but enlightening”.

Fletcher calls the “Maps and Margins” section “fundamental,” but even then, this part of the gallery isn’t simply presented as the start of a timeline. “Scourged Back”, a photograph from the 1830s, serves as a point of reference, a germ: the tiny image is majestically manifested in works that will be produced more than a century later via photography or sculpture manipulated like Gordon ” , a vacuum-formed plastic piece by Arthur Jafa that reproduces the subject’s protruding triangular arm in a piece that decrypts the three-dimensional wounds of the flogging. The progression along this wall creates a devastating atmosphere. A small but striking 1980s sculpture by Houston-based Melvin Edwards, “Palmares”, also feeds into the theme, its twisted pieces of metal reminiscent of the scars marked by hatching on the back of the man identified only as “Gordon” .

Comfort, party, rebellion

A collection of portraits representing blacks from different countries at different times constitutes the last gallery of the exhibition.

He pulls a thread that connects various regional panels sewn together: various nations across the Americas. “Afro-Atlantic Histories” certainly aims to showcase various ways in which African cultures were taken from their native land and sunk into a faraway place, where they served for later purposes – comfort, rebellion, celebration – as they were absorbed into other cultures. The exhibition is full of what Fletcher calls “echoes” – small elements that cross time and national borders to resonate the same in very different contexts. “There are elements that connect the pieces throughout,” she says.

In this way, the exhibit makes two great land masses separated by the equator (and many Caribbean islands as well) feel interconnected by a macabre trade that – over the centuries – has changed Western cultures in inestimable ways.

The painting “Skylark” particularly caught my attention as I worked through this exhibition. The hopeful explosions of color applied through the centuries were certainly touching. But “Skylark” is a strangely haunting work. Lynette Yiadom-Boakye’s play features a black man, his neck surrounded by a feathered collar. Painting stands out among his business, which often sports splashes of bright color. “Skylark” works with brown in the same way that Rothko Chapel canvases work with purple: the colors blend into something that looks like black, then reappear depending on the light. The figure in the painting is surrounded by ostentatious decor but framed with such sobriety that its glamor requires careful attention and perfect light.

Two small strokes of white paint break up the dark tone of the paint, each representing the stark white sclera of the character’s eyes.

Here, the celebration of blackness or brown requires a long, hard look. The whiteness of the eyes is imposing but also a distraction – as if Yiadom-Boakye asks the viewer to come closer to see the variety of shades in the painting. Observe what has been too often invisible.

andrew.dansby@chron.com


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Anarchist illustrator turns to radical stories to fight fascism https://expo-monet.com/anarchist-illustrator-turns-to-radical-stories-to-fight-fascism/ Tue, 19 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/anarchist-illustrator-turns-to-radical-stories-to-fight-fascism/ anarchist illustrator NO bonzo produces decentralized media in a highly bureaucratic cultural landscape. Their illustrations, murals, and literature are emerging in unexpected places, from the streets of Portland, Oregon, to the ends of Reddit and Twitter, addressing work relationships and identity in the workplace and on the streets. Growth and care are central themes manifested […]]]>


anarchist illustrator NO bonzo produces decentralized media in a highly bureaucratic cultural landscape. Their illustrations, murals, and literature are emerging in unexpected places, from the streets of Portland, Oregon, to the ends of Reddit and Twitter, addressing work relationships and identity in the workplace and on the streets.

Growth and care are central themes manifested in bodies made of leaves, workers plowing the land and black block protesters breaking police lines. Each work of art sends a clear and bold message with bright images on black backgrounds. Detailed depictions of families and comrades appear energetic but intimate, sometimes juxtaposed with wrecked police cars and shattered Nazi outfits.

NO Bonzo, “Talk to the plants, not the cops” (2015)

Channel the monochrome drawings of political cartoons from the early 20th century and wood engravings, Bonzo draws on radical traditions with elements of graffiti, union symbols, queer erotica, and ordinary people living under police and border surveillance. Printmaking allows the artist to reproduce and distribute his art quickly and across a wide range of media (eg, posters, banners, clothing, and stickers), reflecting a desire to shatter what they call ” the small fiefdoms of privatized technical knowledge ”.

“Art placed in its own sphere as an institution separate from everyday life was and continues to be an attack on the creative mind – the creation’s alienation from life,” Bonzo told Hyperallergic. “A lot of times when you tell people about their attraction to anarchism, they identify subcultures within punk or hip-hop. These spaces are incredibly rich and saturated with expression, much of which won’t necessarily be identified as art or end up in a gallery or museum.

NO Bonzo, “The worker must have bread but she must also have roses” (2019)

With PM Press, Bonzo posted on Zine of May 1st of the fire every day! – which depicts animals dancing around a campfire of riot gear – plus one antifascist coloring book and illustrated reissues by Pierre Kropotkine Mutual aid: a factor of evolution (1902) and The Great French Revolution (1893). Bonzo complements the Russian historian’s words with images of riots and pantries, adapting stories of community organizing to today’s abolitionist movement.

Influenced by DIY art communities, Bonzo asserts that shared values ​​create a common aesthetic. This can be seen, they claim, not only on the walls of punk houses or stick-and-poke tattoos, but in the organization against racism and dispossession. In this way, their work is internationalist, expressing solidarity with all those who oppose capitalism and the far right in the world.

“Having public spaces that feature strong visible art exhibits and projects that explicitly state anti-racism as a value, that totally reject transphobia, that celebrate and value dignity and compassion – these can be the signs and signals for scenes or communities that operate to disrupt the fascist organization, ”they said.

Bonzo postulates that abolition is not the destruction of society but its rebirth. In the spirit of the end author David Graeber, their art portrays the world as “something that we make, and that we might as well do differently”.

NO Bonzo, “All Our Mothers Killed Fascists” (2016)
NO Bonzo, “Trumpet Call” (2020)

A selection of NO Bonzo’s work can be found on their website, Etsy shop, and PM Press.

The last

Why are so many online shows calling?

The problem with most of the online shows I’ve seen recently is that they don’t really work as if they were online i.e. exist in a digital space – with all the visual presentation possibilities that this technology implies. Like many of my colleagues, I am inundated with offers to watch shows …


Modernist Jewish immigrants who dreamed of a better future in Brazil

As Jewish artists fled WWII, some settled in Brazil, where their resilience and desire for renewal shaped their art that looked with hope to the future.


Figgis’s reflections on bourgeois decadence seem particularly astute in a time of widespread inequality.


From a sea lion in Monterey swimming near an N-95 mask to a polar bear in Norway, cuddling on a small iceberg for the night.


How can you stay close to your loved ones who are on the other side of the political spectrum?


Maybe museums can’t be museums until we in the community tell them that they are.



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Independent film: the stories of these Maine locations are worthy of horror movies https://expo-monet.com/independent-film-the-stories-of-these-maine-locations-are-worthy-of-horror-movies/ Mon, 18 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/independent-film-the-stories-of-these-maine-locations-are-worthy-of-horror-movies/ The horrors that have occurred on the island of Malaga make it a favorite location for a horror film. Photo courtesy of Peter Roberts Maine is scary. Stephen King knows it. Anyone who wakes up to the first blizzard of the year with a broken snowblower knows this. And filmmakers know it – even though […]]]>

The horrors that have occurred on the island of Malaga make it a favorite location for a horror film. Photo courtesy of Peter Roberts

Maine is scary. Stephen King knows it. Anyone who wakes up to the first blizzard of the year with a broken snowblower knows this. And filmmakers know it – even though Maine’s baffling refusal to pass film inducements means that most “Maine” horror movies and TV shows are shot for less elsewhere. But how scary can Maine be? Well, here are some picks for the most inviting real-world locations in Maine for a brave film crew to bring to cinematic life. Or death. All story ideas are freely given – here is Maine finally getting the in-person horror film legacy it deserves. (Also, I’m up for a “story by” credit and some background dots.)

Malaga island (off Phippsburg)

Suggested title: “Malaga” has the correct pronoun (bad = “bad”) and sounds threateningly correct

The pitch: A small island in Maine with an ugly history plays host to a story of buried secrets, where the past is never as dead as some would like to claim.

Maine Horror: The history of the island of Malaga is one of Maine’s most powerful true stories about epic injustice. The eviction and displacement of Métis residents from the island in the early 20th century by the government of Maine involved the white supremacy of the thugs, the questionable involvement of the residents in an infamously cruel mental institution, and even the exhumation of the graves of the islanders. Modern-day horror has come a long way in the genre’s ability to tackle real-world racial issues in a way that goes beyond using real-world horrors for exploitation. . A black filmmaker like Jordan Peele (“Get Out”), Nia DaCosta (the remake of “Candyman”), Barry Jenkins (“The Underground Railroad”) or Misha Green of “Lovecraft Country” might find the right nuanced supernatural version of one of Maine’s most horrific legacies of racial injustice – and how it is bleeding in 21st century America.

Evergreen Ski Resort (Stoneham)

Proposed title: “The Pining” (because of the woods of Maine – you get it)

The pitch: A company’s plan to reopen a long-abandoned ski resort deep in the White Mountain National Forest inadvertently awakens – something – left behind in decades after the disastrous collapse of the plagued tourist trap to scandal.

The horror of Maine: an abandoned seaside resort? In the middle of nowhere (technically on the lonely Maine / New Hampshire border)? Does anyone else have the combined “The Shining” and “Friday The 13th” tingling tingles right now? Maine’s history of expanding and then retreating from some of our most remote and beautiful expanses has left many crumbling structures that the unwary can trip over, should they ever stray from the road. . In a slasher / supernatural thriller, a creepy and evocative location (with lodge interiors frozen in time from the 1970s) is half the battle. Plus, a place like this would have a lot of rusty, forgotten tools lying around.

Pocomoonshine Lake (Princeton)

Suggested Title: If you’re not going to be rushing to see a monster movie called “Pocomoonshine Lake,” you and I are very different people.

The pitch: A science team sent to investigate the worth of centuries of stories about a giant snake-like monster in this Washington County lake discovers something much, much worse.

Maine Horror: listen, if Scotland can have Nessie and Vermont can have Champ, then Maine can have Poco, that’s what I decide is the only name for this mythical (where is it?) Monster of Maine. One of the things that the refusal of various Maine governments to adopt tax incentives for film production in the state misses is the chance to truly show how amazingly glorious Maine can be on screen, and a Partly aquatic horror-adventure monster movie set in the big, dark north is exactly the sort of thing that could put Maine on the map, cinematically speaking.

A house in Flagstaff during the 1950 flood, which could be the basis of his own horror film. Photo courtesy of the Dead River Area Historical Society

Flagstaff (near Eustis)

The title: From the singer-songwriter of Maine Song of Slaid Cleaves about the location, “Below” is spellbinding. (The song itself is a bit casual for our purposes, but maybe it could play on the end credits.)

The Land: A team of illegal divers looking for a secret swamped with the entire city of Flagstaff, Maine discovers that something else was waiting for them.

Maine Horror: Flagstaff, Maine’s Wikipedia page begins with the phrase “a ghost town and an ancient town in Somerset County,” and that’s a good start. Flagstaff’s truth is even better / scarier because the old one The active town of Maine was intentionally flooded to make way for the construction of dams on the Dead River (also a good name) in 1950, leaving what remains of the place to hide deep in what is now Flagstaff Lake . Oh, and the place was originally founded by the infamous traitor Benedict Arnold, so maybe we’re working with some shady ghosts from the War of Independence as well.

All around you

Proposed title: “Le Dérangé”.

The pitch: After a company grabs the land opens a formerly protected forest for development, construction crews begin to experience a growing series of frightening events – marked by very large footprints.

Maine Horror: As Told All Over Maine International Cryptozoology Museum to the book “Bigfoot in Maine»By Portlander and Main Verte Bookstore owner Michelle Souliere, the Pacific Northwest cannot monopolize all of Sasquatch’s sightings. And while the whole of the Bigfoot horror genre has been pretty ugly overall (Bobcat Goldthwait is disturbing, “Blair Witch” -esque “Willow Creek” being the exception), the idea of ​​the possibly mythical anything only becomes a threat once it is pristine and the isolated habitat is disturbed (see title) introduces a lot of thematic weight. Logging, deforestation, man-made extinctions and greed harvesting a giant, furry comeuppance all have the telltale signs of a modern Maine horror classic.

Dennis Perkins is a freelance writer who lives in Auburn with his wife and cat.


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