Exhibition histories – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 15:06:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://expo-monet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-63-120x120.png Exhibition histories – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ 32 32 Audio and photography exhibit to illuminate untold stories in the Limerick Gallery https://expo-monet.com/audio-and-photography-exhibit-to-illuminate-untold-stories-in-the-limerick-gallery/ Wed, 05 Oct 2022 15:06:30 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/audio-and-photography-exhibit-to-illuminate-untold-stories-in-the-limerick-gallery/ THE GAFF, a resource for community and voluntary arts in Limerick, will open a new exhibition of works called Tiny Little Histories. Tiny Little Histories is about promoting untold or little-known historical stories in an audio and photographic exhibition and will be on view at the Limerick City Gallery of Art from 6 October. The […]]]>

THE GAFF, a resource for community and voluntary arts in Limerick, will open a new exhibition of works called Tiny Little Histories.

Tiny Little Histories is about promoting untold or little-known historical stories in an audio and photographic exhibition and will be on view at the Limerick City Gallery of Art from 6 October.

The project was piloted in 2021, during the Covid pandemic, through online gatherings and small in-person gatherings to help artists create work throughout Covid.

Exhibition curator Maeve McGrath said: “We didn’t have a lot of funding so we started with five tiny little stories that told stories of castles, paintings and even little things that happened. on Bedford Row in Limerick City.”

The group then secured funding from the Arts Council and Limerick City and County Council to develop the idea and create an exhibition.

“We now have ten audio artists, talking about 10 little-known stories that will be accompanied by the work of artist photographer Seán O’Riordan,” added Maeve.

The band then tapped British artist Lowri Evans and Maeve to bring this exhibit into the public domain.

Among the audio artists featured is Eoin O’Kelly, RTE Lyric producer and producer of Audio Digging For Fire, who explores memories of the youth takeover of a house in 1980s Limerick.

Hearsay Audio Prize winner Niamh O’Brien explores Kildimo-Pallaskenry GAA being banned from sport for five years in 1950s Ireland and Hearsay Audio Festival founder Diarmuid McIntyre follows the story of the Palatine Colony in Kilfinane.

Other rarely heard stories feature Metallica’s visit to Liscannor, the role the island baths played in the 1950s/60s in the lives of local children and the peacocks that roamed Newcastle West.

After this installation, the stories will be stored online as long-term accessible arts and community resources.

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‘Unlike Learning Other Stories’: Stz’uminus Youth Collaborate on New Exhibit in British Columbia – BC https://expo-monet.com/unlike-learning-other-stories-stzuminus-youth-collaborate-on-new-exhibit-in-british-columbia-bc/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 20:02:37 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/unlike-learning-other-stories-stzuminus-youth-collaborate-on-new-exhibit-in-british-columbia-bc/ Isaiah Harris invites British Columbians to join him on a journey through time. The 20-year-old Stz’uminus First Nation storyteller is one of many contributors to a new multimedia exhibit at the Cowichan Community Center that delves into more than 150 years of colonial history. “Learning this story is different from learning other stories,” Harris explained. […]]]>

Isaiah Harris invites British Columbians to join him on a journey through time.

The 20-year-old Stz’uminus First Nation storyteller is one of many contributors to a new multimedia exhibit at the Cowichan Community Center that delves into more than 150 years of colonial history.

“Learning this story is different from learning other stories,” Harris explained.

“Every place in the world has its own unique story to tell, but in the case of Vancouver Island, colonization … happened not even that long ago. We are talking about 150, 200 years ago.

Read more:

Paid day off to reflect on truth and reconciliation? There’s a way to donate those winnings

The exhibition is called Game-It, which means “truth”, and its posters are accompanied by the phrase: “Reconciliation, the journey of our generation”. Visitors have the choice of free admission or an immersive three-hour guided session.

The story continues under the ad

The exhibit is told from the perspective of Quw’utsu’n elders and presented by Social Planning Cowichan and the Quw’utsun’ Cultural Connections Society. Harris said it was a “great opportunity” to learn about the history of the lands they occupy.

“Not many people here even know that story,” he told Global News. “I wish growing up I would have known a bit more about the history of our local First Nations and our history here on Vancouver Island.”


Click to play the video:







Young Indigenous leaders raise their voices on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation


Young Indigenous leaders raise their voices on National Day for Truth and Reconciliation

Harris has been fascinated by history for many years. He said he grew up hearing the oral and creation histories of his nation, but was also enchanted by European medieval history as a teenager.

He learned about West Coast historical figures in a land and language class at Ladysmith High School, he added, and as an adult he decided that he had a role to play in sharing these stories.

The story continues under the ad

“Learning more about the history of Vancouver Island made me really excited to focus on Indigenous storytelling,” he explained.

“I really hope people will also be drawn to these stories because they find them so fascinating.”

Read more:

Intergenerational survivors on healing through the power of powwows

Harris is now involved in the film world and was interviewed in the documentary film Orca Cove Media Tzouhalem, which examines the life of Cowichan Chief Tzouhalem. He also narrated the film, directed by Leslie Bland and Harold Joe, and screened in March.

“Thanks to this crazy course of events, I was able to be part of the Tzouhalem documentary, the story that I knew so well and was so excited about,” Harris said.

“I’ve absorbed as much of the projects I’ve been involved in as much as possible because I feel like if I was a little younger I could have really benefited from learning more about Indigenous filmmakers, but there’s no There was no opportunity for me to learn these things.

“Step into this world has done a lot for me as a storyteller and just gives me the confidence to know there is a place for Indigenous stories.”

The story continues under the ad

The public can visit the Game-It exhibition from now until October 6th. The exhibition opened on September 6.

© 2022 Global News, a division of Corus Entertainment Inc.

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Made in his Accra studio, Basil Kincaid’s quilts connect black quilt histories, including his own family https://expo-monet.com/made-in-his-accra-studio-basil-kincaids-quilts-connect-black-quilt-histories-including-his-own-family/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 16:17:47 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/made-in-his-accra-studio-basil-kincaids-quilts-connect-black-quilt-histories-including-his-own-family/ Artist and quilter Basil Kincaid is aiming high, not only with his recent habit of jumping as a form of body training, but also with the ambition of his mixed-media quilting works currently making their New York debut at the artist solo exhibition “River, Frog and Crescent Moon” at Venus Over Manhattan. The Upper East […]]]>

Artist and quilter Basil Kincaid is aiming high, not only with his recent habit of jumping as a form of body training, but also with the ambition of his mixed-media quilting works currently making their New York debut at the artist solo exhibition “River, Frog and Crescent Moon” at Venus Over Manhattan. The Upper East Side gallery’s seven large-scale quilts feature densely woven, story-rich surfaces that combine the subliminal with the everyday. twisted bodies with large phalluses span dreamlike, flowing landscapes; geometric patterns provide mind-bending backdrops. Overall, the vivid hues – mostly textiles that Kincaid collects from those close to her – remain lingering.

Basil Kincaid in his studio. Photograph courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan, New York.

“Some of the mythology in the work takes everyday elements in life and assigns additional meaning,” he says. “It could be seen simply as a leap or a metaphor for taking a leap of faith or reaching a new height.” The bouncy silhouette of the series’ only vertical quilt, Frog (2022), is autobiographical, capturing both his recent hobby and the limits of his studio practice. This year alone, the 36-year-old has been featured in group shows at Kunsthalle Krems in Austria, the Smithsonian American Art Museum in DC, Laumeier Sculpture Park in St. curator Legacy Russell, “The New Bend”, and another solo exhibition in Miami with the Mindy Solomon Gallery.

Melanin Activation: Harvesting the Sun, 2020-2022, Basil Kincaid Quilt;  92 x 92 x 1 in (233.7 x 233.7 x 2.5 cm).  Courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan, New York.
Melanin Activation: Sun Harvest, 2020-2022, Basil Kincaid. Photograph courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan, New York.

Moving to Accra in 2014 as part of an Arts Connect International residency as a painter was a turning point in Kincaid’s life and career. After years of working as a college art teacher, he had felt the need to open a new chapter in his own practice – and the residency allowed him to choose an international destination for a nine-month stay. Kincaid chose Ghana to see the dungeons built for slaves on the coast during the slave trade. There he started to do quilting for the first time, “because I felt close to my family history“, he says. “After an upbringing focused on the Western canon in school, I wanted to know what my lineage produced.” Using his “muscle memory” to bend over the paper to draw while a 10 year old was helpful in spotting and weaving horizontally on the floor. Today, the artist’s work espouses local Ghanaian fiber traditions, such as kente fabric, with traditional black American techniques, “to look at their relationships through the materials and the act of weaving,” he explains.

Praise around the seed, 2022, Basil Kincaid.  Embroidery and hand-woven cotton fiber on canvas;  67 x 88 x 1 in (170.2 x 223.5 x 2.5 cm).  Courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan, New York.
Praise around the Seed, 2022, Basil Kincaid. Photograph courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan, New York.

Coming from a family with a long history of quilting, Kincaid recalls watching his grandmother and friends doing needlework on his grandparents’ farm in Arkansas with “a distant curiosity.” . Today, the spiritual element of her practice is heavy “because I can feel her energy with me.” Revisiting the family line also gave Kincaid a fresh look at art history. Her grandmother’s intuitive quilts, similar to the southern tradition of Gee’s Bend, serve as inspiration. “These patterns she created are the pinnacle of abstraction, but no one thought of them that way,” Kincaid says. Her own work is committed to giving the quilt the artistic lineage it deserves.

The Frog, 2022, Basil Kincaid.  Quilt;  128 x 69 x 6 in (325.1 x 175.3 x 15.2 cm).  Courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan.
Frog, 2022, Basil Kincaid. Photograph courtesy of the artist and Venus Over Manhattan.

Quilting in his Accra studio where all the works for his new show come from, the act is bigger than himself, a meditation that weaves together the efforts of generations of famous and forgotten black quilters. Sewing emotionally charged fabrics together with intuition is key to letting your subconscious mind lead the way. “If I had to filter my ideas through my cognitive mind, who knows if I would have started quilting,” admits Kincaid.

“River, Frog and Crescent Moon” on view at Venus Over Manhattan through October 8, 2022, at 120 East 65th Street, New York, New York 10065.

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The exhibition explores the intersecting histories of art, crafts, feminism and textiles | New https://expo-monet.com/the-exhibition-explores-the-intersecting-histories-of-art-crafts-feminism-and-textiles-new/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 16:31:21 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-exhibition-explores-the-intersecting-histories-of-art-crafts-feminism-and-textiles-new/ Prairie Interlace: weaving, modernisms and a larger frame, 1960 – 2000 is an ambitious exhibition project that opened on September 9 in the Nickle Galleries, part of the UCalgary Libraries and Cultural Resources. Prairie Tracery examines the explosion of innovative textile art on the Canadian prairies during the second half of the 20th century. Although […]]]>

Prairie Interlace: weaving, modernisms and a larger frame, 1960 – 2000 is an ambitious exhibition project that opened on September 9 in the Nickle Galleries, part of the UCalgary Libraries and Cultural Resources. Prairie Tracery examines the explosion of innovative textile art on the Canadian prairies during the second half of the 20th century. Although largely ignored in the history of arts and crafts on the Prairies, it was a time of intense energy and creativity.

A cooperation between Nickle Galleries and MacKenzie Art Gallery from Regina, Prairie Tracery is a traveling exhibition based on public and private collections from across Canada, including 60 works by 48 artists. Working on the prairies, they challenged traditional approaches to weaving and embraced new techniques, materials, shapes and scales.

Looking back a generation, the transformation of weaving, crocheting and tapestry into contemporary forms of artistic expression is nothing short of breathtaking,” says Timothy Long, Chief Curator, MacKenzie Art Gallery and Co-curator of the exhibition.

What we appreciate about the land, culture, history, art and politics is beautifully woven into every fiber of these works.

The exhibition addresses several themes: new directions in weaving including experiences with and beyond the loom, the relationship between textiles and architecture, the influence of the prairie landscape, as well as the relationship between gender and textiles and the impact of feminism.

Inese Birstins, Mindscape, 1978, collection of the Surrey Art Gallery, gift of Bruce Ambrose.

Photo: Cameron Heryet, courtesy Surrey Art Gallery.

“One of the most important contributions of this project, beyond the striking exposition and significant scholarship, is the community we are building,” says Dr. Michele Hardy, PhD, curator, Nickle Galleries and co-curator of the exhibition. “We are grateful to connect generations of artists, artist groups and guilds, scholars and collectors by sharing their inspiring stories.

Featured are a number of monumental works created for architectural settings, including that of Kaija Sanelma Harris rising sun1985 (created for the TD Bank Tower designed by Mies van der Rohe in Toronto) and Marge Yuzicappi Untitled Tapestry1970 (created for the Dr. John Archer Library designed by Minoru Yamasaki at the University of Regina).

Other textiles featured include a life-size woven tree stump, textiles featured at Expo ’67, a series of Aboriginal hooked rugs and Metis artists, and an iconic feminist crochet sculpture that challenged the representation of women in art.

Prairie Tracery artists include settlers, immigrants, natives and Metis artists as well as influential visitors. These include Mariette Rousseau Vermette, a Quebec weaver renowned for her large-scale commissions, who taught at the Banff Centre, and American artist Ann Hamilton, who studied at Banff.

Other influential artists include Ann Newdigate, Pirkko Karvonen and Margaret Harrison. Hailing from South Africa, Newdigate’s fine painterly tapestries explore identity and relationships. Karvonen, who immigrated from Finland, was inspired by the prairie landscape, its colors and textures. Harrison is a M based in SaskatchewaneThis artist has transformed rug hooking into a vehicle for self-expression and advocacy.

The exhibition runs through December 17 at the Nickle Galleries, with additional programming including artist talks and exhibition tours. Details are available on the Nickle Galleries website.

Prairie Tracery is organized by Dr. Michele Hardy, PhD, of Nickle Galleries, Timothy Long of MacKenzie Art Gallery and Dr Julia Krueger, PhD, independent curator. The exhibition will show in three other galleries in Western Canada over the next few months: the Mann Art Gallery in Prince Albert, SK. (Spring 2023), Art Gallery of Southwestern Manitoba in Brandon, Man. (summer 2023) and MacKenzie Art Gallery in Regina, Sask. (Fall 2023).

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The Oldham Stories Festival returns with an impressive line-up https://expo-monet.com/the-oldham-stories-festival-returns-with-an-impressive-line-up/ Mon, 05 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-oldham-stories-festival-returns-with-an-impressive-line-up/ The Oldham Stories Festival and Heritage Open Days are back this year with an impressive range of events for the people of Oldham. The exciting lineup includes everything from guided tours of the streets, including a ghost tour near the end of September, to the lives and works of our borough’s inventors, artists, and influencers. […]]]>

The Oldham Stories Festival and Heritage Open Days are back this year with an impressive range of events for the people of Oldham.

The exciting lineup includes everything from guided tours of the streets, including a ghost tour near the end of September, to the lives and works of our borough’s inventors, artists, and influencers.

The Oldham Storytelling Festival begins on September 9 and ends on October 1, with most being free to the public, although some events must be booked in advance.

Reservations can be made by calling 0161 770 4654 or emailing archives@oldham.gov.uk

Let’s take a look at some of the notable events to put on the calendar.

friday september 9

Oldham Parish Church, 10am-2pm

The church, which was built in 1830 and is a Grade II listed building, invites members of the public to take a look at its crypts, vaults and display of Oldhamers killed in the Spanish Civil War.

If you can’t get there on Friday, it reopens the next day at the same time.

St. Chad Church, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.

This monument has been a place of worship since 1215 AD and even has its own depiction of “The Last Supper” by Leonardo da Vinci.

The church will be open to everyone from Friday to Sunday.

Oldham Lyceum, 11am-12pm

Take a guided tour of one of Oldham’s most iconic buildings.

You need to book in advance for this one.

Guided Walk with Hollywood Canal Society, 1 p.m.

Have you ever wondered about the history of the Hollywood Canal?

Meet outside the cafe at Daisy Nook Country Park to learn all about the historically significant role this canal has played.

If you miss it, you can also attend the Saturday march at the same time.

Saturday September 10

Ferranti Invention Collections, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

There will be a walk-in session at Oldham Local Studies and Archives for locals to learn more about one of the most important electrical engineering companies of the 20th century.

Oldham Microscopy and Natural History Society, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

This open house showcases the wonderful invention of the microscope and highlights the important contribution of Northwestern inventors.

There is also a chance to see flies, mushrooms and other items in the natural history collection at Gallery Oldham.

Booking is essential for this one as tours start from 10.30am at the Gallery Oldham.

Visit of the clock rooms of St. Thomas Church, from 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Celebrate the 150th anniversary of St Thomas’ Church in Moorside with this unique tour of its tower, bells and clocks.

Guided walk on Union Street, 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Union Street is one of Oldham’s most famous streets – so get to know it all by meeting at the Peace Garden to take part in this guided walk.

Excavations of the Roman Fort, Castleshaw, 2 p.m.

Want to know more about the two Roman forts and the latest excavations in 2014, 2016 and 2017?

Meet at the Waterworks Road car park, next to the Castleshaw Outdoor Education Centre.

monday september 12

Cemetery records – 2-3:30 p.m.

To find out more about the Oldham Cemetery Archives, go to Oldham Local Studies and Archives on Union Street.

Illustrated conference on the pre-Victorian Sholver, 7 p.m.

There will be an illustrated lecture hosted by Moorside and District Historical Society at St Thomas’ Church, Glebe Lane.

tuesday september 13

Oldham Edge Walk, 10.30am-12pm

Take a hike down memory lane on the Oldham Edge Walk.

Meet at the White House, Henshaw Street, to participate.

Amazing Inventions: Len Gabriels, 2-3 p.m.

Discover the life of Len Gabriels who invented the hang glider in his garage.

It’s at Oldham Local Studies and Archives, 84 Union Street, and booking is essential.

The Tudor Bed: That’s Authenticity, Saddleworth, 7:30 p.m.

Attend this lecture by Adam Bowett hosted by the Saddleworth Historical Society on the discovery of the royal Tudor bed.

Go to the Saddleworth Museum High Street in Uppermill for this one.

Thursday September 15

Visit the War Graves at Greenacres Cemetery from 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.

A guided tour around the First World War graves in the cemetery.

Meet at the entrance to the cemetery.

Saturday September 17

The Old Road through Oldham, 11am-12.30pm

Join Jeremy Sutcliffe for a walk along an ancient medieval road.

Meet at Oldham Loucal Studies and Archives on Union Street and book in advance.

Sunday September 18

Tours of George Street Chapel, 11 a.m., 12 p.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m.

Join a tour of this Grade II listed chapel, built in 1815 by parishioners, many of whom worked as hatters and in the local mills.

You will need to book in advance for this tour.

monday september 19

Oldham Coliseum tours, 11 a.m. and 2 p.m.

Take a guided tour through this unique theatrical space that is said to be haunted.

It’s on Fairbottom Street, and booking is essential.

Transforming Oldham Library, 2-3 p.m.

Come and see this presentation from Tilbury Douglas, the entrepreneurs involved in the transformation of the Espace Education library, Galerie Oldham.

Thursday September 22

Oldham Railway Walk: Mumps at Alexandra Park 10.30am-12pm

Enjoy this walk led by Stephen Darlington, exploring Oldham’s railway history.

You must also book for this one and the meeting takes place at the local Oldham Studies and Archives.

friday september 23

Holy Trinity Church, Waterhead, Heritage Weekend.

Come get dressed and enjoy guided tours with quizzes and various family activities at this Waterhead church.

The festivities start on Friday and will run all weekend.

Swaminarayan Temple, Copster Hill Road, 10am-12pm

Do not miss the opportunity to come and see the interior of this Hindu temple.

If you miss it, it is also open on Saturday October 1st.

tuesday september 27

Clem Beckett: Motorcycle Legend and War Hero, 1 p.m.

Enjoy a talk from Rob Hargreaves who wrote a book about Oldham motorcycling legend Clem Beckett.

The conference will take place at Performance Space, Oldham Library.

Thursday, September 29

Ghost walk in Oldham town center

Towards the end of September, join this spooky walk and learn about ghostly happenings in Oldham.

Head to the Old Museum, Greaves Street, to participate.

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10 of New York’s Oldest Libraries and Their Forgotten Histories https://expo-monet.com/10-of-new-yorks-oldest-libraries-and-their-forgotten-histories/ Fri, 26 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/10-of-new-yorks-oldest-libraries-and-their-forgotten-histories/ Courtesy of Morgan Library and Museum. New York City’s libraries are renowned for their elegant architecture, extensive collections of classic and contemporary works, and quiet places to study within the bustling city. However, many of the city’s more than 200 libraries were originally built as former residences, courthouses, club gathering spaces, and even prisons. Reading […]]]>
Courtesy of Morgan Library and Museum.

New York City’s libraries are renowned for their elegant architecture, extensive collections of classic and contemporary works, and quiet places to study within the bustling city. However, many of the city’s more than 200 libraries were originally built as former residences, courthouses, club gathering spaces, and even prisons. Reading in the New York Society Library, you may learn in the former master bedroom of the opulent Rogers family. At the Grolier Club, you can even scan books on the shelf that leads to a secret door opening onto a spiral staircase. Read on to discover the secret histories of 10 of New York’s oldest libraries!

1. The New York Society Library (1754)

The Whitridge Room of the New York Society Library
The Whitridge Room of the New York Society Library. Courtesy of the New York Society Library,

The New York Society Library, founded in 1754, was New York’s first library open to the public. Originally built for the well-to-do Rogers family, the library opened in a hall of Old City Hall with an open membership system. Until the founding of the public library system in 1895, the library of the New York Society was called “the library of the city”. Although the library is widely considered the oldest in the city, the physical location of the New York Society Library changed several times until it moved to its current location, 53 East 79th St., in 1937.

It is believed that the Rogers family lived in the current building, a large historic Italianate townhouse built in 1917, until 1935. Most of the reading rooms have since been refurbished. For example, the Whitridge Room was the former master bedroom and the Hornblower Room was the former maids quarters. Today, the library hosts many events for children, teens, and adults, such as lectures, writing classes, and reading groups.

Next: #2 The library of Société Générale
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reenact the past through oral histories, drama and music https://expo-monet.com/reenact-the-past-through-oral-histories-drama-and-music/ Sun, 21 Aug 2022 20:02:24 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/reenact-the-past-through-oral-histories-drama-and-music/ Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that this article contains images of deceased persons. Amy Elwood, a Wangkumara/Adnyamathanha elder and cultural repository of knowledge and grandmother to one of us (Lorina Barker), inspired a series of creative works about her experience of being away from the country. In 1938, 130 Aborigines, including Amy’s […]]]>

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are advised that this article contains images of deceased persons.


Amy Elwood, a Wangkumara/Adnyamathanha elder and cultural repository of knowledge and grandmother to one of us (Lorina Barker), inspired a series of creative works about her experience of being away from the country.

In 1938, 130 Aborigines, including Amy’s family and other Wangkumara families, were forcibly removed from the country at Tibooburra to Brewarrina Aboriginal Station – the old mission.

The community was transported 500 kilometers east to the Baaka Barwon rivers on the back of three gubbies (government) trucks.

In 2006, Lorina had a conversation with her grandmother about her life experiences and memories. This was turned into a poem called An Ode to My Grandmother, a short film called Tibooburra: My Grandmother’s Country, and a traveling multimedia exhibit called Looking Through Windows.

This thread also inspired an immersive theatrical performance Trucked Off and the song An Ode to My Grandmother.



Read more: Friday Essay: Stories Written in the Country – A Journey Through Adnyamathanha Yarta


Learn from elders

Oral history is the recorded account of memories of a person’s past for historical and research purposes. Indigenous oral history is more than a methodology. It is a living history, practiced for thousands of millennia, intrinsically linked to the way of life and culture of indigenous peoples.

As Indigenous people, we experience it every day: it’s part of who we are, where we come from and who we relate to. It also determines our interconnected relationship and responsibilities to our lands, rivers, seas, skies, and to all living and inanimate things in the natural and spiritual worlds.

In these works, Amy Elwood is able to share her memories and stories and those of her family.

On mission, life was hard and orderly. The Wangkumara were not able to speak their language or practice their culture; The elders worried for the country and many died of broken hearts.

Bell signaling at Old Brewarrina Mission, photo by Julie Collins, Brewarrina, 2018.
Julie Collins

With each development in history, artists and musicians have had to go through a process of decolonization to work within an Indigenous cultural framework. We have been invited by Wangkumara elders Gwen Barker, Rick Elwood, Rebecca McKellar and Louise Elwood to cultural creation spaces online and on Country where knowledge has been transferred in new forms.

With each successive workshop and performance, we learned more from the Elders through thread and storytelling. The creative process, from poem to final performance, developed over many years.

Tell a story

An immersive theatrical work, Trucked Off began with the poem. In immersive theatre, the audience is not a passive spectator, it is part of the story.

In Trucked Off, audiences follow the Tibooburra families, walking in their shoes, reliving Tibooburra’s journey to Brewarrina in the far north west of New South Wales.

Upon arrival at the mission, the old Brewarrina station, mission manager and staff explain to the public how their lives will be governed by the ringing of a bell. The number of rings indicates how they will react: whether they have to congregate to work, get rations, or, for the children, go to school or see the nurse for ‘care’.

Penalties are severe for non-compliance.

A group of 12 people in period costume with a dog posing on a green lawn.
Actors of the Trucked Off performance, photo by David Elkins, Armidale 2018.
David Elkin

The Wangkumara alumni, including Lorina’s mother, Aunt Gwen Barker, participate as actors in Trucked Off, making their story their own and telling their story.

The storyline is dynamic, incorporating themes of grief, loss, and trauma that reverberate through generations, reflecting the ongoing impact of colonization.

It is a theater of ‘telling the truth’, embodied and experiential, increasing people’s understanding and memory of this living history.

The audience is an integral part of the show.
Ray Bud Kelly Junior, Author provided

stories in song

Another work inspired by the poem was an opera song. In the Western tradition, the composer has the final say on the music, but this process required a new way of working involving the community and elders of Wangkumara.

The process ensured that cultural protocols were followed and that permissions were sought to tell the story and find the correct sound. Wangkumara elders were able to give us a detailed insight into the story and emotion behind the poem.

The musical sections were plotted and the Elders wanted the song to have an uplifting ending. It demonstrated the courage and resilience of the people, their connection to the country and the tracks of Mura (Songlines), even after their abduction. The song ends with a triumphant fanfare and the lyrics “Country knows you”.

While the poem is in English, the Elders added Wangkumara words into the song, including the word Ngamadja, which means “mother”. Wiradjuri soprano Georgina Hall discussed with the elders the many meanings of the words and the exact way to pronounce them when recording the song.

The language and story of the abduction finds a new home in classical music and song.

The use of oral histories and archival documents in these creative works allows family, community, artists and musicians as well as the public to walk in the footsteps of our elders.

We speak their words and experience for a moment what it was like to be pulled out of the country, transported, locked up and locked up on a mission. The original poem, production, and accompanying music also help debunk the takedown, and not only build audience empathy and understanding, but also serve as a call to action.



Read more: Friday Essay: ‘I can’t wait to have my kids home’: Collecting love letters written for the children of Noongar


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Discover the queer stories of labor movements https://expo-monet.com/discover-the-queer-stories-of-labor-movements/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 20:05:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/discover-the-queer-stories-of-labor-movements/ We live in a disorienting period of resistance to communism in the United States. Despite the fall of the Soviet Union, a “specter” still hovers in the capitalist unconscious, dripping in socially regressive political and media debates that aim to distract ordinary people from operating practices in full view. The far-right’s targeted attacks on homosexuality […]]]>

We live in a disorienting period of resistance to communism in the United States. Despite the fall of the Soviet Union, a “specter” still hovers in the capitalist unconscious, dripping in socially regressive political and media debates that aim to distract ordinary people from operating practices in full view. The far-right’s targeted attacks on homosexuality also have an ideological bent – ​​without heteropatriarchal structures like marriage and the nuclear family, how could the working class maintain the institutions of capital?

Maybe because communism was never fully realized Around the world, artists and conservatives have struggled to fully express the influence of sexuality and gender on left-wing politics. Pratt Manhattan’s last exhibition, The labor of love, the fag of labor, is working to change that. Comprised of artworks and ephemera from the labor movements of the past century, the expansive group exhibition saliently examines the tensions that still exist between revolutionary and identity politics.

Installation view of The labor of love, the fag of labor (courtesy Pratt Manhattan Gallery)

Curator Olga Kopenkina conceptualizes many vectors of homosexuality in political theory and practice. Representative works of early 20th-century historical socialists are interwoven with film and agitprop by contemporary Russian and Eastern European artists, complemented by interactive artwork and literary exhibits. In two large galleries, photos, prints and sculptures appear in the foreground, while more intimate and pornographic material inhabits a darker back room.

Visible from the 14th Street window, copies of the Dyke Action Machine poster series American Lesbians: Don’t Sell Yourselves (1998) urge passers-by to reject rainbow capitalism, covering a mural painted by Pratt student Eliette Mitchell. The green and gray background of the mural brings out the red, white and blue palette of the posters, transforming the aesthetic of the American heart into a rejection of capitalist values. Alongside this is a photo of gay Catholics on a picket line, published in The Ladder: A Lesbian Critique by the Daughters of Bilitis, is placed alongside a poster of Peter Hujar’s iconic Gay Liberation Front photograph, evoking the current struggle between trans-exclusive radical feminism and the non-traditional queer family.

Dealing with these disparities upstream allows The labor of love to integrate conceptually more difficult works. On an opposite wall, non-binary South African photographer Zanele Muholi’s stunning nude self-portrait in a mining helmet, inspired by the 2012 Marikana massacre, brings the heavy history of mining work into the present. While the photography of social reformers like Lewis Hine showed white miners blackened by coal dust, Muholi’s obsidian skin visualizes the increasingly racialized dynamics of the industry.

Zanele Muholi, “Thulani II, Parktown” (2015) (courtesy the artist, Yancey Richardson, New York, and Stevenson Cape Town/Johannesburg)

Entire sections of the gallery show how contemporary artists pay homage to queer seniors. The yes! The Association’s striking dedication to the late poet Audre Lorde, which spans the height of one wall, details how she discovered her own homosexuality in the workplace. Photographs of a Connecticut electronics factory, where Lorde had her first lesbian encounter with a colleague at age 18, are displayed alongside a black and white GPS map of the site and printed pages detailing the experience of his autobiography, Zami: a new spelling of my name.

An entire corner of the gallery also honors the memory of late queer theorist Harry Hay, who co-founded the Mattachine Society and Radical Faeries after being expelled from the Communist Party USA in the 1940s because of his sexual orientation. A display case contains photos and prints of his many manifestos and pamphlets, such as “Radical Commonality” and “The Homosexual’s Responsibility to the Community.” On the adjacent walls, Russian artist Yevgeniy Fiks recounts the contradictions of Hay’s experience as a communist and gay man on sanded wooden stencils. Fiks’ scribbled handwriting is barely noticeable on the smooth surface, alluding to the subversive nature of his politics and sexuality in a purely capitalist state.

Yevgeniy Fiks, “Toward a Portfolio of Woodcuts (Harry Hay)” (2013) (courtesy the artist)

Kopenkina shows that Russian culture is not monolithic by including works by queer contemporaries. Hagra’s Visual Novel Evening with the Bros (2017) allows viewers to choose their own adventure in a story of mutually supportive male and transmale cisgender workers, one of whom is an affinity-affirming trio. In a colorful installation by German Lavrovsky, pink beanbags flank an asexual 3D silicone baby dangling from a harness, which visitors are encouraged to handle and kiss. Kopenkina places this alongside a video of Angela Beallor discussing the meaning of queer parenthood, adapted from the banned Soviet play I want a baby.

The exhibition takes a light-hearted look at more sensitive issues, such as the persecution of homosexuality in Estonia. Jaanus Samma’s four-part film series, Not Fit for the Job: A President’s Story (2015), shows scenes of men peeing in their mouths and making identification prints with their genitals. Kopenkina cleverly projects the films next to a table with recordings of Samma’s criminal trial. This curatorial choice indicates how Joseph Stalin’s decision in 1934 to recriminalize homosexuality may have limited the Soviets’ ability to exit capitalism, as it reversed some of the social gains made by abolishing the penal code of the Russian Empire. .

German Lavrovsky, “Reborn” (2020) (courtesy the artist)

Since the show’s 2017 iteration in Connecticut, the international left has evolved significantly, especially in countries in Latin America and Asia. As such, the Euro-American and Russian accent leaves me wondering about similar stories in Venezuela, Cuba, India, and China, among other countries, as well as Communist uprisings during African decolonization. Likewise, while Harry Hay worked with Indigenous movements in the 20th century and helped popularize the Two-Spirit movement, it would be interesting to see how queer Indigenous artists approached communism’s relationship with pre-capitalist society. Given the heavy propaganda campaigns against these countries and communities, even from more liberal sources like Mother Jones and AlJazeerait seems more necessary than ever.

As Martin Niemöller once wrote, “They first came for the Communists…” Indeed, the Nazi suppression of the German Communist Party coincided with the destruction of the research institute and trans clinic of Magnus Hirschfeld, who nearly erased those resistance records. Since bodily autonomy and workers’ rights remain subject to constant and often intertwined rules threatens, The labor of love reminds us of what is still at stake.

The labor of love, the fag of labor continues at the Pratt Manhattan Gallery (144 West 14th Street, Union Square, Manhattan) through August 20. The exhibition was curated by Olga Kopenkina.

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An anti-memorial project bears witness to the unspoken stories of partition https://expo-monet.com/an-anti-memorial-project-bears-witness-to-the-unspoken-stories-of-partition/ Mon, 15 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/an-anti-memorial-project-bears-witness-to-the-unspoken-stories-of-partition/ Chicago-based Indian artist Pritika Chowdhry’s latest project, “Unbearable Memories, Unspeakable Histories,” hints at the painful and silenced narratives that have been left out of the score’s dominant discourses. Even after 75 years of one of the world’s worst human tragedies, memories of the score still cause nights of dreaded anxiety in people, it still causes […]]]>

Chicago-based Indian artist Pritika Chowdhry’s latest project, “Unbearable Memories, Unspeakable Histories,” hints at the painful and silenced narratives that have been left out of the score’s dominant discourses.

Even after 75 years of one of the world’s worst human tragedies, memories of the score still cause nights of dreaded anxiety in people, it still causes a sense of longing in the hearts of those who have left their ancestral homes, lost their family members and an inheritance that belonged to them.

To understand the tragedy and pay homage to the millions who were part of it, Chicago-based Indian artist Pritika Chowdhry has created an “anti-memorial” exhibition, the tenth in The Partition Anti-Memorial Project since she started with Queering Mother India in 2007.

In the Partition Anti-Memorial project, his anti-memorials are quietly provocative, temporary, and incorporate visceral materials and soundscapes. Chowdhry emphasizes that his goal is not to “speak for women” and his experiential art installations invite viewers to witness, providing a space for mourning, remembrance and repair.

His latest project, “Unbearable Memories, Unspeakable Histories,” at the South Asia Institute in Chicago, alludes to the painful and silenced narratives that have been left out of the score’s dominant discourses.

Chowdhry spoke to Firstpost via email, discussing his current exhibition, the inspiration behind the Partition Memorial Project, and his journey since 2007 as an artist and individual.

Excerpts from the interview:

Creating art consistently on a single theme for over 15 years cannot be without a lasting impact on the creator, that too on one of the most emotionally and physically violent events of the 20th century. Who was the Pritika who started the anti-memorial project in 2007, what motivated her in the first place, and where has this journey taken you as an artist and an individual?

Big question! What brought me to the score was September 11, 2001 and the Gujarat riots in 2002. That’s when I started asking my mother questions about the score.

I started actively researching the history of the Hindu-Muslim communal riots in India, which of course led me very quickly to the 1947 score. By the time I did my first art project on the score in 2007 titled Queering Mother IndiaI had a much better understanding of my own family history from Partition. Over the years I have learned how embedded the score is in the daily politics and lived experience of the Indian subcontinent.

I did What the body remembers in 2008, and silent waters in 2009, which dealt with the gendered experience of the Score. Shortly after, I did Remember the crooked line which views maps and cartography as 20th century partition technologies, and includes other countries that have been partitioned. My projects under the Partition Anti-Memorial Project have now explored themes such as monuments in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh, the English language as a tool of colonization, the 1971 war and its many ramifications, the Jallianwala massacre Bagh and the year 1919 in world history and a deep dive into the creation of the Radcliffe line.

Thus, as an artist, my artistic practice has broadened not only my understanding of the score, but also of world history and current affairs. I have particularly emphasized the transnational links between geopolitical events in different countries, in my artistic projects.

As an individual, my artistic practice has had a profound effect on me. By researching and making art to commemorate such violent events, I have learned to channel my personal outrage into gestures of reparation, which is how I think about my art projects.

Also read: Prime Minister Narendra Modi pays tribute to those who lost their lives during the partition

Browsing through images from your latest project, you are working with several different mediums at the same time. Is there any meaning or relevance to what you choose as medium and material for a specific artwork?

Yes, I am very careful about the materials I choose for a particular project. The Partition Anti-Memorial project includes ten different projects and each of them is made of a different material.

For example, in Broken column, I use latex and silicone to make casts of small sections of important monuments in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. I chose latex and silicone for their skin qualities. The casts in this project are translucent when backlit and have a fragile tactility that conveys to the viewer that these panels are like the skin of the monument. The latex captures every detail of the wall, ornament, door or text, every grain of dirt, every last stain of tobacco. It’s like taking a handprint of the monument in a very bodily way.

Unbearable Memories Unspeakable Histories The Antimemorial Project bears witness to the unspoken stories of the Partition

Chowdhry’s experiential art installations invite viewers to witness, providing a space for mourning, remembrance and repair.

As another example, in Memory leaks, I used authentic copper dharapatras and havankunds which are used in Hindu temples to pour milk and water over the deities and to make the sacred fire. And then I engraved the name and year of a communal riot on each dharapatra and placed scraps of partially burnt Urdu newspapers and books in the havankunds.

It is this concept of material referentiality in the visual arts that essentially means that each material incorporated into a work of art brings its own history, symbolism and cultural specificity into the work of art, so it must be conceptually aligned on the purpose of the artwork.

Read: India@75: Stories of sacrifice, pain and courage in the struggle for freedom come to life in these 10 books

Could you tell me a bit about some of the artworks, the thinking behind them and how they came about?

Sure, let me tell you a bit about Silent Waters: The Countless anti-memorial.

silent waters is an art installation of 101 larger than life ceramic feet glazed black inside and out. The legs are filled with salt water which adds an element of durability to the installation. Water often drips from the ceramic feet onto the floor of the gallery, and the water also evaporates during exposure, leaving behind a crystalline residue of salt inside and out feet.

The feet represent the caravans of people crossing the new border in 1947. This installation is an anti-memorial that recognizes and commemorates the largest migration in world history – the population exchange of the partition of India in 1947 .

The underlying idea is that water has a ritual and ceremonial role in the funeral rites of Hindu, Muslim, Bengali and Sikh communities. Therefore, in this installation, I nod towards the presence and role of water with a minimalist sound installation that includes the sounds of rain, running feet and a body falling into the water, and the soundscape plays on a loop.

Over the past 15 years and 10 projects, what is your best memory? Also, what is your creation closest to your heart?

Unbearable Memories Unspeakable Histories The Antimemorial Project bears witness to the unspoken stories of the Partition

Each project completely owned me when I made it, and it would be really hard to choose a favorite! As for the best memory, I guess the trip to Dhaka and Lahore for the Broken column project to make casts of the monuments there. It was an amazing experience because they feel like Delhi and Kolkata, and it’s kind of surreal that these cities are so similar to Indian cities. I will always cherish the friendships and camaraderie of artists and ordinary people I met in Lahore and Dhaka. They were so kind, hospitable, curious, tolerant and, ultimately, familiar! It only strengthened my faith that the people of South Asia are one people in spirit, even though they are artificially divided by borders.

The subject of your works remains one of the most tragic chapters in the lives of many people in India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. How is it generally received by visitors to your exhibitions, what sort of emotions do your exhibitions arouse in people?

Politics in our three countries is quite polarized and communalized by politicians who have their own agendas. And the partition is such an important event, with such a complex history and so much bloodshed, that most people are simply disengaged or overwhelmed by it. It is difficult for the human heart to understand such violence, and I understand.

Unbearable Memories Unspeakable Histories The Antimemorial Project bears witness to the unspoken stories of the Partition

So what I try to do in my exhibitions is to educate, engage and generate empathy in visitors. Many of my works also invite the public to participate, as in Memory leaks, I invite viewers to simply pour water through a dharapatra or two. In Remember the crooked line, I invite viewers to sit down and play a game of chess or parchisi. And many do! And even if they don’t, I talk to them and find that the conversation itself opens a door to a new understanding of the traumatic event of the score, and also how we can repair and heal that trauma over time. time.

Do you plan to bring any of your projects to India? What are your plans for the future?

I would like! I was able to show a small part of the Partition Anti-Memorial project in Delhi and Lahore a few years ago. But I hope to bring the whole project to India soon. Shipping sculptural installations poses logistical challenges, but I hope to partner with like-minded institutions and exhibit the ten anti-memorials in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh.

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Family history ; visits in the past | Featured Columnists https://expo-monet.com/family-history-visits-in-the-past-featured-columnists/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/family-history-visits-in-the-past-featured-columnists/ At our family reunion in the Adirondacks, upstate New York last month, one of my brothers brought a folder of papers which turned into a highlight of our week together. . The papers included my mother’s diary for 1934 and 1935, the engagement period with the man she married, my father. The file also contained […]]]>

At our family reunion in the Adirondacks, upstate New York last month, one of my brothers brought a folder of papers which turned into a highlight of our week together. . The papers included my mother’s diary for 1934 and 1935, the engagement period with the man she married, my father. The file also contained the long letters she had written to my father during this period. When my brothers weren’t on the golf course, we would sit in the living room reading excerpts from the letters to each other, thinking about my mother’s comments. She seemed to love dancing to big band music almost as much as she loved highballs, someone remarked. Then there were those two other guys she talked about in the letters. Were they serious rivals for my mother’s attention?

At the end of the week, we agreed how much fun it was to look so closely at this part of the past, a part that held special significance for her children many years later. My youngest brother then filed more papers – photos and clippings about our uncles, aunts and grandparents – before announcing that he was compiling an extensive family history. It must be reserved for the younger generation, he said. None of us disagreed. We had just spent a pleasant week discovering our past. Why refuse this treatment to those who will come after us?

A week earlier, while visiting Southern California, I had spent a day with someone who had actually started writing family history. His parents, Leo and Angie Delarosa, arrived in Guam shortly after the war and became legends in the region. Leo Delarosa was one of the pioneers of the old administration of the Trust Territory. During his long years in the area, he had lived almost everywhere and the couple had touched the lives of just about everyone they met. In the eyes of all who knew them, Leo and Angie were the archetypal godparents. With their fascinating experiences in the Philippines during the war, why wouldn’t their daughter want to save it all for posterity?

These recent encounters have brought to mind others who wanted to create their own family history. A Palauan woman now residing in Guam who wanted to recapture her own family’s past. A former Peace Corps volunteer who served on an atoll in Chuuk and returned with his family years later to live among the same people. A few people here in Guam who had been captivated by their family’s experiences over the years.

Many people want to cling to what is precious to them. This is quite understandable. But how do you preserve their family’s past? Can all of these family stories be published as books, even with the boom in self-publishing these days? Is there enough space on the library shelves, or even in the cloud, to hold that many family stories?

I have to admit that I used to be a bit skeptical of such family histories, perhaps because I always thought we should prioritize broader accounts of the past – something like conventional histories that we all learned to read during our school days. Certainly, we need books that offer a wide range of past times.

But family history is also important. These days, when families don’t get together as often as they once did, how could we share family stories with each other? These old family celebrations where stories were told around the table are much less numerous today. The evening hours when the elders of the house entertained their children with stories of the good old days are now taken up with television, video games or texting on cell phones. It’s hardly a revelation when you hear how individualized our society has become these days. It’s as if everyone had decided to go their own way.

If family stories help us regain a sense of unity and strengthen our bonds with one another, then they serve an important purpose. Whether self-published, distributed digitally, or even written on palimpsest, they can be a blessing to those who come after us. These family stories can amuse and fascinate them, just as my mother’s letters did for her children ninety years after they were written.


Father Fran Hezel is a former director of the Micronesian Seminar pastoral-research institute. After serving as Jesuit Mission Superior in the Micronesian Islands for six years, he continued to lead the Micronesian Seminary until 2010.

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