contemporary art – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 23:16:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://expo-monet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-63-120x120.png contemporary art – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ 32 32 Capture Photography Festival’s featured exhibition zooms in on family stories https://expo-monet.com/capture-photography-festivals-featured-exhibition-zooms-in-on-family-stories/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 23:16:44 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/capture-photography-festivals-featured-exhibition-zooms-in-on-family-stories/ The pandemic means many people are spending a lot more time with their loved ones. Over the past year, this has prompted Emmy Lee Wall, Executive Director of the Capture Photography Festival, to reflect on the role of the camera in recording personal stories and family narratives. “I think photography was really a tool through […]]]>

The pandemic means many people are spending a lot more time with their loved ones. Over the past year, this has prompted Emmy Lee Wall, Executive Director of the Capture Photography Festival, to reflect on the role of the camera in recording personal stories and family narratives.

“I think photography was really a tool through which family structures and family relationships were defined,” Wall said. Law by telephone. “If you think of people’s first experiences with photography, it’s usually with their family. Everyone is photographed at birth, usually by their parents or guardians, immediately.

She also points out that people’s idea of ​​what a “standard family” or “good family” looks like is often defined by a family portrait. In these images, she says, family members are sometimes dressed in their finery or presented with their most prized possessions.

“I think this interconnection between the definition of family and photography is really interesting,” says Wall.

This is what led her to curate Family Album, a featured exhibition at this year’s Capture Photography Festival. But it’s not just a recitation of typical family photographs. Far from there.

Local, national and international artists in the exhibition use photography as a tool to investigate their family histories.

Indian-born, New York-based photographer Cheryl Mukherji, for example, says in an interview in the Capture Photography Festival catalog that she decided to “subversively reinvent and recreate my mother’s wedding photographs.”

Over a period of five years, images were taken of her mother, who was then studying to become a surgeon, to attract a husband.

Mukherji hand-painted the images behind the self-portrait on the Lawthe cover. This represents the way Indian brides-to-be have often been shown: in front of works of art or with objects reflecting aspects of their personality.

Cheryl Mukherji Wanted beautiful girl loving home2021, (inkjet print, 52.07 x 36.83 cm) appeared on this week’s cover straight georgia.
Courtesy of the artist

In graduate school, Mukherji learned that a good portrait should capture the essence of a person. But in a YouTube interview, she says studio wedding photography wasn’t that at all: it was about projecting one person’s idea onto another person.

Wall compares the image on this week’s cover Law to an old fashioned personal ad. “It’s like the era version of posting on some sort of dating site,” she says.

One of the Vancouver artists in the exhibit, Rydel Cerezo, said in the catalog that he wanted to reflect on how his family members have changed physically during the pandemic. He readily admitted that his images “may lack social glamour, but the idea of ​​family in all its banality felt intimately fuller”.

“The examples of being photographed by one’s parents and the idea of ​​family presented through photography made me think of how family photographs have leaned more towards presenting ‘success’ in the age of Facebook,” Cerzo said. “During this time, it became apparent to me that family albums lived online and were usually presented in place of some sort of ‘realization’.”

Rydel Cerezo, Lola curly hairfrom the series Back of My Hand, digital scan 2020 from a 50.8 × 40.64 cm negative.
Courtesy of the artist

In Family Album, Italian-born artist Silvia Rosi explores her personal story through self-portraits of her appearing as her mother and father, whose roots go back to Togo.

“In my work, there is the idea of ​​showing my parents’ past but doing it in a different way from the images that one might find in a family album”, explains Rosi in the Capture catalog. “I wanted to activate a reverse process.”

She adds that her images do not reflect reality but rather “attempt to capture moments that are not always joyful but express the complexity of the individual”.

Dainesha Nugent-Palache, Red Earth of Saint Elizabeth (What is brought us here)2019, inkjet print, 152.4 x 103.35 cm.
Courtesy of the artist

Dainesha Nugent-Palache’s mother, based in Toronto, loved collecting fragile figurines, which made no sense to her as she grew up. In his still life photographs, the artist includes these objects, often in the background.

“When creating this work, I was thinking less about how photography constructs the idea of ​​a family and more about objects found in the domestic setting of a family home – in particular, the memories and stories associated with it. to these objects, and how they inform our family’s perception,” Nugent-Palache states in the catalog.

Wall says the images in the exhibit reflect the different dynamics that exist within families.

“These relationships are seen as positive by society, but can often be complicated or unfamiliar or changing and constrained,” Wall says.

Additionally, she adds that families can be both comforting and strained. “I think photography has become such an interesting tool for artists to explore things that are meant to be really familiar and close to us but are in many ways often unknowable.”

Vancouver artist Anna Kasko Stanley Park Gardens Cruise (archival transparencies overlaid on lightbox, 27.94 x 41.91 x 5.08) is from his 2021 Found Slides series.
Courtesy of the artist

Another of the local artists, Anna Kasko, presents family photos of a different kind in the exhibition. According to Wall, Kasko found an old box of slides and tried to find the owner so they could be returned. But the person didn’t want it, which seemed very interesting to Wall because they were documenting a family history.

Kasko ended up editing those slides, transposing one image onto another to create something entirely new.

“She presents it as light boxes,” Wall explains. “They’re actually quite small and shiny.”

Wall compares them to jewelry, inviting the viewer to come closer. For the curator, these images raise the question of whether the photograph really presents a truth.

“They were true,” says Wall. “But what happens when you put them on top of each other?” And what new reality can you draw from it as a viewer looking at this work and creating your own meaning? »

In the Capture catalog, Kasko says she creates a more universal experience by interfering with the original intent “to blur the specificity of the subject.”

“I invite the audience to look and through the image, literally and allegorically,” she says.

Birthe Piontek, Tie2015, archival pigment print, 30.48 x 30.48 cm
Courtesy of the artist and Jones Gallery

A third Vancouver-based artist, Birthe Piontek, pointed out in the catalog that “the relationship between photography and truth is very complicated.”

“Even if an image tries to deliver fact rather than fiction, it can only show one specific angle: that of the photographer,” Piontek said. “Many other angles are left out, including everything that existed outside of the frame when the image was taken. At best, a photograph can represent one version of the truth.”

The people and objects in her images were staged, she added, noting that it was done “to tell a story and express the emotions my family members and I felt at losing my mother. because of dementia”.

Another artist, Meryl McMaster, said her Ancestral project was due to a search for family photographs. This was done in order for her to learn more about her native heritage (nêhiyaw [Plains Cree] Red Pheasant First Nation in Saskatchewan and Siksika Nation in Alberta).

These images lacked the level of detail she hoped to find, so she began collecting paintings and photographic portraits of 19th century Native women and men across the United States.

She focused on the works of photographers Edward S. Curtis and William Soule, as well as painter George Catlin, who documented traditional Aboriginal life in the belief that it would soon disappear.

“Their ideas and misrepresentations have spread to the public,” commented McMaster. “Actually, my ancestors were still very much alive, but not the way they were depicted in these pictures.”

Meryl McMaster, Ancestral 122008
Courtesy of the artist and the gallery Stephen Bulger and Pierre-François Ouellette contemporary art

She ended up putting these images on the bodies of herself and her father, which were covered in white pants like a screen.

“This process of playing with light and projection onto the body creates a surreal, ghostly quality to the images, with aspects of the subject past and present visible.”

Another artist, Toronto-based Anique Jordan, has an image on the show titled family scrapbook, which gave its name to the exhibition. She returned to her hometown of San Fernando, Trinidad, where her mother (like McMaster’s ancestors) did not have access to a camera.

According to Wall, Jordan wanted to put himself in a situation similar to what his mother went through growing up.

Anique Jordan, family scrapbook2015, chromogenic print, 55.88 x 76.2 cm.
Courtesy of the artist

“She went to places that were culturally, socially, and economically important within her family,” Wall says. “She photographed herself on these sites.”

Because photography is so accessible and relatable, Wall thinks it places a great responsibility on the festival to take great care in how images are presented to audiences.

Family Album is presented free of charge at the Pendulum Gallery, which is located in the lobby of the HSBC Canada building on West Georgia Street, across from the Vancouver Art Gallery.

“I really feel like photography is a medium of our time,” Wall says. “It’s such a common language. It’s everywhere. Everyone connects to it in one way or another.

Continued

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Melbourne Museum will open an immersive dinosaur attraction https://expo-monet.com/melbourne-museum-will-open-an-immersive-dinosaur-attraction/ Mon, 07 Mar 2022 01:03:44 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/melbourne-museum-will-open-an-immersive-dinosaur-attraction/ Opening on 12and In March, the Melbourne Museum’s new immersive attraction – Triceratops: The Fate of the Dinosaurs – will feature one of the most complete Triceratops fossils in the world, giving the public the opportunity to come face-to-face with the fossil of 1 000 kg 67 million years old. Discovered in 2014 in Montana, […]]]>

Opening on 12and In March, the Melbourne Museum’s new immersive attraction – Triceratops: The Fate of the Dinosaurs – will feature one of the most complete Triceratops fossils in the world, giving the public the opportunity to come face-to-face with the fossil of 1 000 kg 67 million years old.

Discovered in 2014 in Montana, USA, Horridus was recovered from under 3.5 meters of sandstone. Since arriving in Melbourne in 2021, a team of paleontologists, curators and collections managers from Museums Victoria have been working to prepare the fossil for display.

Measuring six to seven meters from tip to tail and standing over two meters tall, the fossil – named Horridus after the species of Triceratops to which it belongs – is larger than an adult African elephant.

Horridus is one of the most important paleontological discoveries in the world. At 266 bones, it is the best preserved Triceratops skeleton in the world and the most complete real dinosaur skeleton in any Australian museum.

Chief Executive and Director of Museums Victoria, Lynley Crosswell, says: “It is not uncommon for museums to collect dinosaur fossils. It is however exceptional for a museum to have a specimen of the quality and significance of this fossil, we look forward to the public experiencing Horridus.

The Melbourne Museum’s immersive exhibition takes visitors on a journey through time to explore the landscape and complex ecosystems it once housed during the Cretaceous period.

The exhibit showcases the environments where the Triceratops roamed, the creatures Horridus experienced, and what became of the Cretaceous survivors. Dinosaur fans will also learn about the process of fossilization and how paleontology helps us understand vast stretches of time.

In addition to the captivating exhibit, the acquisition of Horridus positions Victoria as a leader in paleontological science, providing economic and educational benefits beyond the exhibit.

Victorian Creative Industries Minister Danny Pearson notes that “Horridus and its incredible story will be a huge drawcard for the Melbourne museum, inspiring wonder, curiosity and delight in dinosaur fans of all ages for generations. future.

“The museum is constantly changing and that’s one of the reasons why Victorians love it so much. We are proud to offer an awe-inspiring attraction that will be a crowd pleaser and lead to a new understanding of our natural history.

This exhibition is part of a $36.2 million investment provided by the Victorian Government in the Victorian Budget 2021-22 to support the creation of new immersive family experiences at the Melbourne Museum, including Triceratops: Fate of the Dinosaurs.

For tickets and more information on Triceratops: Fate of the Dinosaurs, visit melbournemuseumtriceratops.com.

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December 3, 2018 – Melbourne’s largest solar panel will be installed at the Melbourne Museum

July 18, 2018 – Key objects announced for the world premiere of the Nelson Mandela exhibition at the Melbourne Museum

June 26, 2017 – Magic Memories will provide a personalized imaging experience at the Melbourne Museum

December 19, 2015 – The Melbourne Museum to host the world premiere of ‘Jurassic World: The Exhibition’

July 18, 2014 – Record number of educational visitors to the Melbourne Museum

April 10, 2011 – Opening of the Tutankhamun exhibition at the Melbourne Museum

November 2, 2010 – Melbourne Museum secures King Tut

July 12, 2010 – Melbourne museum attendance exceeds two million

September 18, 2021 – Four architectural firms shortlisted to design Melbourne’s new NGV Contemporary

January 7, 2021 – NGV to Receive $20 Million Grant for New Contemporary Art Gallery

July 28, 2018 – MoMA at NGV Expo attracts over 100,000 visitors in first month

April 1, 2018 – The NGV Triennale breaks records with one million visitors

July 10, 2017 – NGV’s Van Gogh reaches record 420,000 visitors


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Hot spring shows include Alberto Giacometti in Cleveland, “Afro-Atlantic Histories” at the NGA, Winslow Homer at the Met, and Cézanne in Chicago. https://expo-monet.com/hot-spring-shows-include-alberto-giacometti-in-cleveland-afro-atlantic-histories-at-the-nga-winslow-homer-at-the-met-and-cezanne-in-chicago/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 11:03:35 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/hot-spring-shows-include-alberto-giacometti-in-cleveland-afro-atlantic-histories-at-the-nga-winslow-homer-at-the-met-and-cezanne-in-chicago/ Most of these shows took years to plan. The expertise, scholarship, and logistics behind each of them would amaze you even in ordinary times. It is all the more impressive considering the obstacles, uncertainty and grief that so many Conservatives and their colleagues have had to negotiate in recent times. Hats off to the museum […]]]>

Most of these shows took years to plan. The expertise, scholarship, and logistics behind each of them would amaze you even in ordinary times. It is all the more impressive considering the obstacles, uncertainty and grief that so many Conservatives and their colleagues have had to negotiate in recent times. Hats off to the museum workers!

Here are 10 shows I’m passionate about – but honestly, there are so many more. Go to the websites of your favorite museums and see what they have in store for you.

Arguably the most acclaimed of the second generation of Abstract Expressionists, Mitchell rose to prominence in 1950s New York, before spending more than four decades in France. This retrospective, co-organized by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, will open in Baltimore with 70 works borrowed from public and private collections in the United States and Europe.

Joan Mitchell March 6-August. 14 at the Baltimore Museum of Art. artbma.org.

This is an ambitious Cleveland preview of the modern sculptor’s famous post-war work, comprising 60 sculptures, paintings and drawings. Giacometti is best known for his slender sculptures, the fruit of fiercely focused attention over long periods of time. Identified with post-war existentialism as Meursault, the fictional protagonist of Albert Camus’ “The Stranger,” they seem to have been whittled down to a dense core by the space around them. The show will tour Houston, Seattle and Kansas City.

Alberto Giacometti: towards the ultimate figure From March 12 to June 12 at the Cleveland Museum of Art. clevelandart.org.

Security guards become conservative

Who spends more time in galleries than security guards? what they or they to like? What would be they or they do you want us to see? The Baltimore Museum of Art asked 17 of its agents to choose an exhibition of works from the collection. In collaboration with renowned art historian and curator Lowery Stokes Sims, the rangers not only chose the pieces, but also contributed research, design, didactics, content for the accompanying catalog and public programs. They are also paid for the extra work.

keep the art From March 27 to July 10 at the Baltimore Museum of Art. artbma.org.

Time after time, lately more concerned with anticipating criticism and checking identity boxes than creating a coherent exhibition of a powerful new art, the Whitney Biennial, organized this year by David Breslin and Adrienne Edwards, nonetheless remains the most followed survey of contemporary art in America. However successful it may be overall, this year’s iteration, like most of its predecessors, is sure to introduce us to some fascinating new talent.

Whitney Biennial 2022: ……………. April 6-Sept. 5 at the Whitney Museum of American Art. whitney.org.

“Afro-Atlantic Stories”

This exhibition of more than 130 works of art dealing with the complex experiences and stories of the African diaspora, from the 17th century to the present day, arrives at the National Gallery of Art after a stay in Sao Paolo, Brazil, in 2018. It will include the art of Njideka Akunyili Crosby, the late David C. Driskell and Zanele Muholi, as well as historical paintings, sculptures and photographs not only from Africa, but also from Europe, the Americas and the Caribbean.

Afro-Atlantic Stories From April 10 to July 17 at the National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.

This exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art will be the largest exhibition devoted to Homer, one of America’s most popular artists, in 25 years. Focused on the theme of conflict, it will present an overview of the career of the great 19th century artist in 90 oil paintings and watercolors.

Winslow Homer: Cross Currents From April 11 to July 31 at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. metmuseum.org.

Six feet high and seven feet wide, Henri Matisse’s “The Red Studio” (1911) caused perplexity when it first appeared. It is now one of the anchor masterpieces of the Museum of Modern Art in New York. MoMA will make the painting, which depicts six of Matisse’s paintings, three of his sculptures and a decorative ceramic plate scattered around his studio, the centerpiece of an exhibit exploring the circumstances of the work’s creation.

Matisse: The Red Studio May 1-Sept. 10 at the Museum of Modern Art. moma.org.

Four major museums curated this exhibit, dedicated to one of America’s most acclaimed and influential post-war painters, before deciding to cancel everything before it opened at the National Gallery in 2020. Their reasons were confusing, but it seems they wanted to be sensitive to some viewers’ imagined reactions and possibly some dreaded protests. (For a time, Guston, an outspoken opponent of racism, painted and drew stupid figures with Ku Klux Klan hoods to signify stupidity, evil, and psychic mud). The rearranged schedule means the show will kick off in Boston rather than the nation’s capital, where it will open in February 2023.

Philippe Guston Now May 1-Sept. 11 at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. mfa.org.

This exhibition will attempt to demonstrate not only how important Cézanne – the artist’s ultimate artist – was in his time, but also how relevant he remains. It is certainly a case worth making. With 90 oil paintings, 40 drawings and watercolors, and two comprehensive sketchbooks, the exhibition is billed as the first major Cézanne retrospective in 25 years and the first in Chicago in 70 years. It should be a knockout.

VSstarzanne May 15-Sept. 5 at the Art Institute of Chicago. artic.edu.

Adams, 84, captured some of the most beautiful and clear landscapes in the history of American photography. Known for his aesthetic of modesty and compassion and his strong advocate for the environment, he believes in the ability of art to change us for the better. Adams is getting the full retrospective treatment at the National Gallery of Art, which will feature 175 of his photographs taken between 1965 and 2015.

American Silence: The Photographs of Robert Adams May 29-Oct. 2 at the National Gallery of Art. nga.gov.

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Troy Montes-Michie on Mining Stories of Violence Using Collage – ARTnews.com https://expo-monet.com/troy-montes-michie-on-mining-stories-of-violence-using-collage-artnews-com/ Wed, 16 Feb 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/troy-montes-michie-on-mining-stories-of-violence-using-collage-artnews-com/ There is a long line of artists working with collage, although it can sometimes seem that all roads lead to the early experimentations of Cubist artists which were later refined by members of the Dada movement, who began to recycle and recombining materials in response to absurdity. of the First World War. “Revolted by the […]]]>

There is a long line of artists working with collage, although it can sometimes seem that all roads lead to the early experimentations of Cubist artists which were later refined by members of the Dada movement, who began to recycle and recombining materials in response to absurdity. of the First World War. “Revolted by the butchery of the 1914 World War, we in Zurich dedicated ourselves to the arts,” wrote Hans Arp. “While the cannons rumbled in the distance, we sang, painted, made collages and wrote poems with all our might.” Latent throughout was a kind of violence that was sort of a reflection of the carnage that surrounded these artists.

About a century later, artist Troy Montes-Michie began searching for a less violent form of collage, which could, in its own unusual way, be generative. He began to reflect on his childhood in El Paso, Texas, where he was born in 1985, and the real proximity of this border town to Mexico. “There was such an overlap with Mexico, and I always remember feeling that at a young age, that there was this division,” he said in a recent Zoom interview. “I could see Mexico, the river and the bridges. It’s literally right there, less than a mile away. As he matured as an artist, he began to think of a collage as a way to reflect this lived experience. “For me, the cut is not about violence, but more about reflecting on our own contours,” he continued.

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The fruits of Montes-Michie’s experiments were memorably seen at the 2019 Whitney Biennial, in works such as Los Atravesados ​​/ The skin of the earth is seamless (2019), in which photographs of reclining men in striped clothing are cropped so that they appear cross-hatched, their images receding and emerging from the background. (Its title refers to Gloria Anzaldúa’s 1987 book Borderlands/La Fronteraa formative text for Montes-Michie.) Works from the same series as Los Atravesados are now included in the artist’s first major survey.

Titled “Rock of Eye,” the exhibit opens Wednesday at the California African American Museum, which curated it in collaboration with the Rivers Institute for Contemporary Art & Thought in New Orleans, where the New York-based artist was a research resident (albeit a virtual one, given the pandemic). The name of this exhibit refers to a tailoring term used to refer to when a garment is cut without careful measurement – ​​an apt name, given that Montes-Michie considers her own process to be “intuitive”.

“It wasn’t always like this,” he said, “but I think now that I’ve been in this medium for so long, I kind of know what needs to happen with my process.”

Many of Montes-Michie’s collages use images of black men found in magazines from bygone eras. In some of his early works, images of naked men that appear to be taken from pornographic publications were mixed and matched to a point where the human form borders on abstraction. These images were produced by photographers who “objectified men of color, bodies of color,” Montes-Michie said. In the hands of the artist, the characters in the images are made more complex by elisions and additions that make them double and seem slightly imperceptible.

Dense collage featuring an array of images whose images are hatched to a point where they are abstract.  In the center is an orange circle.

Troy Montes-Michie, Foreground as background2018.
Courtesy of the artist and Company Gallery, New York

By the time of the 2016 US presidential election, Montes-Michie’s methods began to change. In response to Donald Trump’s rhetoric, he began to think back to his own family history. He spoke to his stepfather, who claimed that the zoot suit – a high-waisted form of dress popularized primarily by African Americans, Mexican Americans, Filipino Americans and Native Americans Italian at the beginning of the 20th century – originated in Mexico. Puzzled by this misunderstanding, Montes-Michie delved into the archives to try to unravel the lineage of the zoot costume and discovered that it came from Harlem. “I didn’t know that was the first American costume,” Montes-Michie said. “I didn’t know it was worn by men of color, and also by women.”

Vintage photograph of a black man in a field.  He looks down and wears a white undershirt and high-waisted black striped pants.  Surrounding the photograph is an abstract pattern.

Troy Montes-Michie, Untitled (stripes)2019
Courtesy of the artist and Company Gallery, New York

His research confronted him with a long history of racism in the United States. In 1943, a series of riots began when a member of the Los Angeles City Council attempted to ban suits, allegedly in response to fabric shortages resulting from World War II. But the ban was implicitly, if not explicitly, racist, given that the zoot costume was considered by many to be a “badge of delinquency” for the groups that wore it, such as the Los Angeles Times written that year. White military men began attacking Mexican Americans and Filipino Americans in the streets, making national headlines in the process in what was dubbed the Zoot Suit Riots.

The resulting work Montes-Michie did on the zoot suits, now on display at CAAM, took him deep into the holdings of the New York Public Library and far beyond, and brought him into contact with the camouflage theory, on which the soldiers relied. blur the senses of enemies. “It’s supposed to cause confusion,” he said. “I sort of equated it to the confusion of white Americans watching these insiders who are just trying to create a new identity.”

Blending images that Montes-Michie found, he also began to rely on stitching techniques he learned himself. In some cases, fabrics are even affixed to the works. Stitches look like sutures that repair a healing wound. For example, in Untitled (Feeling Blue), a 2020 collage included in the CAAM show, two naked men’s bodies merge in such a way that one of their legs emerges from the back of the other. They are crossed by vertical lines of zigzag thread, its fibers neatly tied together, just like these two figures.

“I don’t view the Troy collages as sites of violence, even though they do charge historical violence. That’s not the job they do,” said Andrea Andersson, the founder of the Rivers Institute who organized the Montes-Michie survey with New Orleans space curator Jordan Amirkhani and Taylor. Renee Aldridge, curator at CAAM. “The work they do is also about building a relationship, and part of that is sometimes an entirely formal relationship – just pure beauty.”

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Special Edition: Underrecognized Art Histories https://expo-monet.com/special-edition-underrecognized-art-histories/ Tue, 25 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/special-edition-underrecognized-art-histories/ Our work at Hyperallergic means that we often come across stories of under-recognized art stories that tell a story we don’t often hear, whether it’s a little-recognized art movement outside of a city or region or type of work that is largely invisible to art lovers as institutions have been slow to adopt the work […]]]>

Our work at Hyperallergic means that we often come across stories of under-recognized art stories that tell a story we don’t often hear, whether it’s a little-recognized art movement outside of a city or region or type of work that is largely invisible to art lovers as institutions have been slow to adopt the work due to various factors. While we often research and publish under-recognized art stories, we decided to compile many of these unique stories in a special edition of Hyperallergic to bring them to light. To understand contemporary art, it is necessary to investigate the connections sometimes invisible to those who are unaware of the backstories.

Many of these stories, such as alternative spaces in Los Angeles, may be familiar to many, but we have chosen to include them here to highlight their importance. In the case of LA’s alternative spaces, I frequently encounter people outside of Southern California (and sometimes Californians) who don’t realize the significance of what this city’s artistic innovators have actually created as a foundation that has contributed to the global success of the city. art scene today. In other cases, like the Cass Corridor, I was surprised to learn that people outside the Detroit area rarely know about the movement that has influenced many contemporary artists, writers, and curators in the area and beyond. of the.

A number of stories focus on individuals, like Rafael França, Sam Tchakalian, PHASE 2, Frances Gearhart, Renluka Maharaj and Suchitra Mattai, some of whom have had business careers, museum exhibits and fame, or the still do, but we thought they would benefit from wider exposure of their work to Hyperallergic readers. We also invited artist and writer Daniel Temkin to write about a programming language that might be the least NFT-compatible digital art possible – although given how this market is changing, I can foresee a time when that will also be a victim of financialization.

Our choices are, of course, subjective, and we urge our readers to take note of any stories we might consider for future editions of this series. We hope you enjoy this edition in the spirit it was intended, which is the start of an ongoing conversation about art history and what is included, or excluded, and why.

  • Jordan Karney Chaim examines the influence of alternative spaces of Los Angeles and how they encourage the artists who today are the bold names in contemporary art.
  • Sarah Rose Sharpwho lives in Detroit, writes about the Corridor Cass movement that has influenced generations of artists from this city.
  • Artist Daniel Temkin writes about the open, community and collaborative approach “esolangswhich point to other little-discussed digital art story threads.
  • Writer John Seed tells the story of the Bay Area artist and teacher Sam Tchakalianwho is best known for his abstractions which introduced squeegee-like techniques into his paintings long before others popularized this visual language.
  • Padder Sadaf written about two Indo-Caribbean artists (Renluka Maharaj and Suchitra Mattai) in Colorado who situate female subjects in their art, based on ancestors, living relatives, and deities.
  • Learned Serouj Aprahamian shares the latest poems illustrated by STAGE 2an artist perhaps best known as the first to create a 3D sculpture based on his graffiti work, which once stood in front of the Javits Center in Manhattan until it was suddenly removed and destroyed under bizarre circumstances.
  • Ela Bittencourt considers the innovation of the Brazilian video artist Raphael Francewhose art is intimately linked to the early history of AIDS in the United States and in his country of origin.
  • Anne Wallentine written on the print studio of Frances Gearhartwhich was a hub of the Southern California Arts and Crafts movement.

We would also like to thank the Sam Francis Foundation for supporting articles that delve into California art history, a subject we have long covered in various ways over the years.

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Exhibition Design in 2022 – Design Week https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-2022-design-week/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 11:55:20 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-2022-design-week/ As part of our Design in 2022 series, Nissen Richards Director Pippa Nissen offers her perspective on what could happen in exhibit design over the next year. Through Henry Wong January 14, 2022 11:55 a.m. January 14, 2022 11:55 a.m. What do you think 2022 holds for exhibition design? Wonderful escape I suspect, as we […]]]>

As part of our Design in 2022 series, Nissen Richards Director Pippa Nissen offers her perspective on what could happen in exhibit design over the next year.

What do you think 2022 holds for exhibition design?

Wonderful escape I suspect, as we find ways to celebrate what it means to be alive and human. However, the cultural landscape has changed. We need to be more aware of who is represented and how our work impacts the planet. We cannot be lazy or careless. Exhibits should be smart, witty and make a statement. They must be worth leaving the house to connect us to the world and the spirit of the times.

We welcome the move to recyclable plinths – like Assemble used for the Charlotte Perriand exhibition at the Design Museum – with stacked cinder blocks to create artwork bases. These can be taken apart and used for another installation or to build something else, like a reconfigurable parts kit. Anything less seems inappropriate now.

The power to improve and transform digital and lighting will also be essential. Exhibits may be slightly jumbled around the edges, held up by pegs, or surrounded by keyed fittings, bolts, or industrial items. If the gesture is correct, it’s fine – as long as it looks good in a photo.

I also predict a return to clean, good quality designs. Perhaps as exhibition designers we should strive to be invisible, only creating an atmosphere, where nothing interferes with the moment of truth between the visitor and the object, painting or idea on display. .


Culture House

What was your favorite exhibition design project in 2021?

In Moscow for work recently, I had the incredible good fortune to see the newly opened House of Culture, designed and detailed by Renzo Piano. I loved the ambition of this building – to rethink what a museum or gallery should be and how exhibits could be better integrated into a series of flexible spaces, encouraging debate and creativity.

The museum is large and includes artist galleries, auditoriums and gardens overlooking the city and the river. I was really impressed with the human voice that comes through in the artwork in this machine-like environment. In a way, the fragility of the works came through more with the coherence of the approach to color, tones and construction materials of the gallery and the building.

The works then on display – by Ragnar Kjartansson – seemed really appropriate. An Icelandic performance artist, whose pieces range from extensive collections of paintings to video installations – expand and contract, reflecting the experimentation of the building itself.

Other highlights include the recently opened Munch Museum in Oslo, an exhibition of the work of photographer Thomas Demand at the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, the exhibition on The French Dispatch by Wes Anderson at 180 Studios, as well as Tate Play at Tate Modern.

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For Dineo Seshee Bopape, dirt, wind and water bear stories of slavery – ARTnews.com https://expo-monet.com/for-dineo-seshee-bopape-dirt-wind-and-water-bear-stories-of-slavery-artnews-com/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 23:38:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/for-dineo-seshee-bopape-dirt-wind-and-water-bear-stories-of-slavery-artnews-com/ “It is difficult for a person to see the entire elephant,” Dineo Seshee Bopape explained on a tour, talking about the animal figurines found in wood and plastic strewn throughout his exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. Referring to the fact that a human may understand a large […]]]>

“It is difficult for a person to see the entire elephant,” Dineo Seshee Bopape explained on a tour, talking about the animal figurines found in wood and plastic strewn throughout his exhibit at the Institute of Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond. Referring to the fact that a human may understand a large animal differently than what, say, an eagle or an ant might, Bopape’s commentary could also describe how a viewer might experience his installation, which requires him to crouch down to inspect these bird and mammal figurines placed on earthen blankets and piles of bricks, or gaze at the floor-to-ceiling walls covered with a thin layer of mud. The rest of the show immerses the spectator in subdued blue lighting and a sensory topography of video and sound projections.

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Soil is a common element in Bopape’s work, serving here as the literal terrain for a miniature landscape as well as an allusion to broader concerns with geography and territory. Water is also at the heart of this work. It appears in the ground drawings on paper of crested and falling waves that Bopape has created over the past two years, enlargements of these projected onto a long wall of the first gallery. Water is once again the center of attention in the second gallery, where images shot on 8mm film, presented at ground level, represent the artist’s shadow projected onto the foaming breakers on the shore of the Rappahannock River in Virginia. Bopape uses these elements to channel larger stories. She met descendants of slave laborers who worked on one of the plantations that once dotted the riverbank and created small oblong clay sculptures bearing the imprints of their hands, suggesting how bodies and substances could jointly bear such a past. . (An extension of this project can be seen at Prospect.5 in New Orleans.)

A close-up image of a sculpture shows a group of clay objects resting on a pile of bricks.  The pieces of clay were cut by the pressure of the fingers.

View of “Dineo Seshee Bopape: Ile aye, moya, there, ndokh… harmonic conversions… mm”, 2021–22, at ICA at VCU, showing The role, 2021.
Photo David Hunter Hale

During the lockdown of his hometown of Johannesburg, Bopape turned to less material means to address how the environment might bear the imprint of violent stories. She collaborated with musician Tlokwe Sehume to mix vocal and instrumental tracks with sounds of the wind that she recorded before the pandemic at sites in West Africa that were at the heart of slavery and the human trade. people, including ports on the coasts of Senegal and Ghana.

These sounds permeate the show, contributing to a cacophony of discursive components that amounts to a public memorial. The subject – those who are dehumanized and lost in the slave trade – slowly emerges, through a mural text that indicates the places where Bopape gathered the ground, sights and sounds that blend into the spectacle, and through a new one. by Bayo Akomolafe in an accompanying booklet. . Akomolafe speaks of a spirit appearing and dancing amid the capture and transport of people from West Africa to North America; like the Bopape exhibition, it is not a manual telling of slavery but living with its own codes of survival.

That this exhibit is shown in Richmond is significant: the city was home to one of the largest auction houses for the sale of slaves. Former capital of Confederation, it is currently in the process of reinventing its commemorations at the grassroots. The central site of the bronze monument to Confederate General Robert E. Lee has been recovered as a memorial to victims of police violence and a staging area for the Black Lives Matter movement.

The spacious white walls of a museum are very different from the outer roundabout where the Lee monument resided. Yet, as the wall text notes, the two share greatness and bear the memory of “the wealth created by forced labor”; museums are, after all, the heirs of a colonial project. The horizontal constellation that Bopape creates on the ICA floor, and his repositioning of the floor on the walls, reorient this space in a way that resembles the salvage of the Lee roundabout, now marked with small gardens, baskets of basketball and memorials to specific people. Sitting under the enormous pedestal and (recently retired) bronze general on horseback, these additions are on a human scale and scale. The two acts induce a recasting of the conventions of looking and remembering.

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Virginia Museum shines a light on untold stories and perspectives https://expo-monet.com/virginia-museum-shines-a-light-on-untold-stories-and-perspectives/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 19:15:09 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/virginia-museum-shines-a-light-on-untold-stories-and-perspectives/ As the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University (ICA at VCU) enters its fifth year, it provides a platform for under-represented perspectives articulated in a range of media. Like many leaders of cultural and educational institutions across the southern United States working on the legacy of historical trauma, CIA Director Dominic Willsdon explores […]]]>


As the Institute for Contemporary Art at Virginia Commonwealth University (ICA at VCU) enters its fifth year, it provides a platform for under-represented perspectives articulated in a range of media. Like many leaders of cultural and educational institutions across the southern United States working on the legacy of historical trauma, CIA Director Dominic Willsdon explores how to articulate a break with the past without denying history. The museum’s current and upcoming programming convincingly demonstrates how institutions can look back while moving forward.

Disable it by New York-based multidisciplinary composer and artist Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste (until June 12) is an immersive sound exhibit that uses frequencies that fall just below human audibility. The exhibition, which is shared between the ICA and the neighboring 1708 gallery, continues Toussaint-Baptiste’s research into what he calls “hyper-audible” object environments, using a car’s audio system as most recognizable bass transmitter. He composes his work as a musical arrangement to analyze how the bass affects cities and their inhabitants. The artist works in a minimal black aesthetic intended to symbolize the shared black experience, creating low frequencies and vibrations that function as sonic representations of minimalism. Disable it presents a new iteration of his work Get down, which refers to the painting by Kazimir Malevich from 1915 Black square.

Detailed view of Jeremy Toussaint-Baptiste, Get Low (The Fall / The Drop) (2021) at the Institute of Contemporary Art of VCU Photo by David Hale

Later this month, the ICA opens an exhibition featuring two Latin American artists who tackle injustice through figuration. Aquí Me Quedo / Here I stay (January 28-June 19), guest curator by Miguel A. López (TEOR / éTica), stages a dialogue between Costa Rican artist Sila Chanto (1969-2015) and Dominican artist Belkis Ramírez (1957-2019) . Both worked with printmaking, particularly large-scale woodcuts, to criticize misogynistic violence and male control of the patriarchal societies in which they both lived. Chanto’s printmaking techniques incorporated supernatural images that addressed marginalization and belonging, as well as the fragile nature of life. Ramírez’s prints typically combine figuration and abstract drawings to explore the vulnerability of the body, gender stereotypes, and sexual harassment of women.

A very different approach to figuration is at the origin of the first solo exhibition of the Ghanaian artist Gideon Appah, Forgotten, Nudes, Landscapes, which opens at the ICA on February 11 with a mix of newly commissioned works and pieces dating back to 2019. Appah’s paintings draw on Ghana’s National Archives of Popular Culture Images, in particularly those of the 1960s and 1970s, reflecting a sense of national memory and pride in the first decades following the country’s independence. The artist applies thick acrylic paint in the middle of glued layers of materials such as photographs, posters and prints. The dynamism of the scenes he creates gives his subjects a distinctive character. Although his work is undoubtedly figurative, through loose brushstrokes and homogeneous blends he creates areas of tremendous abstract force.

Working between abstraction and figuration to present marginalized perspectives, ICA’s list of current and upcoming exhibitions – from Toussaint-Baptiste’s minimalist vision on audibility in urban spaces, to Chanto’s courageous images of injustice and Ramírez, and Appah’s renderings of his country’s history – emphasizes the imperative issues.


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The art of the Ulster Museum at the heart of the autumn / winter program https://expo-monet.com/the-art-of-the-ulster-museum-at-the-heart-of-the-autumn-winter-program/ Fri, 03 Dec 2021 15:14:03 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-art-of-the-ulster-museum-at-the-heart-of-the-autumn-winter-program/ NI National Museums has announced an exciting art program for fall and winter. The diverse range of exhibitions showcase local and international artists and explore deep and provocative themes such as identity, loss, isolation and love. Art serves an important purpose, reminding us that we share a universal human experience, evoking deep emotions and allowing […]]]>


NI National Museums has announced an exciting art program for fall and winter.

The diverse range of exhibitions showcase local and international artists and explore deep and provocative themes such as identity, loss, isolation and love.

Art serves an important purpose, reminding us that we share a universal human experience, evoking deep emotions and allowing us to make connections and feel less alone.

Exhibits include: Mysterious Irish Muse by Tissot: New Acquisitions; Silent testimony; Thought of blue sky; New art, new themes, new acquisitions; Mainie Jellett (1897-1944): Translation and rotation and; Royal Academy of Ulster 140 e Annual exhibition.

Hannah Crowdy, curator of National Museums NI, said: “Through our collections, we hope to inspire and educate new audiences, including those who don’t typically visit an art exhibit.

“Everyone is invited to come and visit our space to see first-hand just how diverse and varied the exhibitions are, perhaps allowing people to discover a new appreciation for Impressionism or contemporary art. “

Exhibition at the museum until 2 sd January 2022, the focal point of Tissot’s mysterious Irish Muse: New Acquisitions is “Quiet” by James (Jacques) Joseph Tissot. A new museum acquisition, Quiet represents Kathleen Kelly, Tissot’s mistress, muse and the inspiration for some of his most famous paintings.

Quiet is exhibited with paintings by Cotes, Lavery and Orpen, which contrast the role of societal beauties and the experience of young women who lived a more fragile existence on the outskirts of mainstream society.



The museum also exhibits Silent Testimony, which is returning as part of National Museums NI’s 100 Years Forward program, marking the centenary of the partition and creation of Northern Ireland. The exhibition, which will run until January 2022, features large-scale portraits of internationally renowned artist Colin Davidson.

Each portrait powerfully portrays the personal experiences of the eighteen people who suffered loss during the unrest.

Colin Davidson said, “The silent testimony reveals the individual and collective suffering of these eighteen people in a way words cannot. All ostensibly have different identities but are bound by a unique and shared experience of loss. When creating the portraits, I wanted to convey each one first as a human being who had suffered from the conflict in Northern Ireland and silently articulate that experience.

“The shared trauma of these eighteen people remains a powerful reminder of our common humanity. “

French photographer Bernard Lesaing first came to Northern Ireland in 1975 and 1976, taking moving and insightful images of the country at the height of the conflict. He returned more than 40 years later to a very different political landscape. He again based his work on the people he met and their stories, capturing not only striking images but also collecting 21 personal testimonies. This fascinating look at Northern Ireland’s journey, through conflict to more peaceful times, is explored in the Faces and Places exhibition.

Thought of blue sky; New Art, New Themes, New Acquisitions is an exhibition that presents Blue Sky Thinking, 2019, by Patrick Goddard, a piece depicting 180 ring-necked parakeets created from recycled lead.

Acquired by National Museums NI 2020, with help from a grant from the Art Fund, the play addresses themes of migration, identity and the climate emergency, deliberately drawing on current discourse on human migration and border control, as well as the artist’s ecological concerns.

Blue Sky Thinking is on display with works from the Ulster Museum of International Significance Sculpture Collection, including Birdman by Elisabeth Frink, HOME by Willie Doherty and Silent Echoes, a sound sculpture by Bill Fontana.

Another artist on display is Mainie Jellet – she has been seen as the driving force that brought abstract art to Ireland and the exhibition explores her journey to this point and beyond, celebrating its impact and the placement of women. at the center of Irish modernism. Mainie Jellett (1897-1944): Translation and Rotation will be on display from October 29 to May 2022.

Jellet’s process is revealed throughout the exhibition, with highly regarded works included, alongside paintings and drawings on public display for the first time, showcasing the richness and richness of his short but prolific career and sharing the “Three revolutions” of his artistic practice.

The highly anticipated 140th Annual Royal Ulster Academy Exhibition runs from 29 October to 9 January 2022 and is a highlight of Belfast’s calendar of events.

Founded in 1879, the Royal Ulster Academy of Arts (RUA) is the largest and oldest organization of practicing visual artists in Northern Ireland. Its annual exhibition is a unique platform for renowned artists and emerging talents to present their works at the Ulster Museum.

Now in his 140 e year, the exhibition includes around 250 examples of painting, drawing, sculpture, photography and video. Some works explore topical themes such as isolation, social distancing, and survival in these strange times. Others share deep messages with hope, humor, passion and integrity.

Hannah Crowdy said: “The RUA exhibit is always a highlight for visitors, showcasing an incredibly diverse range of art and content. We are delighted to welcome the exhibition again, now in its 140 e year, and offer our space to local artists, known and less known, to give their talent a platform and an audience.

“We hope that visitors will enjoy all of the Ulster Museum exhibits over the coming months, and that our fall / winter art exhibition program will leave them inspired, with a new appreciation for the power that art has. to spark emotion and conversation. “

Entrance to the Ulster Museum is free.

Advance reservations are recommended for all exhibitions at the Ulster Museum. Tickets can be booked at www.nmni.com


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Adelaide Festival Center unveils plans for interactive children’s gallery https://expo-monet.com/adelaide-festival-center-unveils-plans-for-interactive-childrens-gallery/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 23:53:47 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/adelaide-festival-center-unveils-plans-for-interactive-childrens-gallery/ Adelaide Festival Center today announced plans to open a new interactive children’s gallery – Children’s Artspace – which will be part of an international network of similar children’s galleries. The gallery will connect with similar institutions around the world and even exchange digital exhibitions and workshops with places such as the Hamada Children’s Art Museum […]]]>


Adelaide Festival Center today announced plans to open a new interactive children’s gallery – Children’s Artspace – which will be part of an international network of similar children’s galleries. The gallery will connect with similar institutions around the world and even exchange digital exhibitions and workshops with places such as the Hamada Children’s Art Museum in Japan and the Children’s Art Museum in New York. It is also currently in discussion with the International Children’s Art Museum in Oslo, Norway, and children’s museums in Australia.

The new space will be dedicated to children of all ages, students and their families, to share great ideas and engage in the art created by and for the children of South Australia. Opening on the 19the In February of next year, it will become a regular attraction at the Artspace venue of the Adelaide Festival Center, complementing the other arts events on offer.

Welcoming a new exhibition each school term, the gallery will present interactive workshops, performances and creative experiences for children and families as part of the CentrED programs, On Stage Adelaide Festival Center and the new Families At Adelaide Festival program. Center, starting next year.

Adelaide Festival Center General Manager and Artistic Director Douglas Gautier notes “Adelaide Festival Center has one of the most comprehensive education and learning programs among international arts centers and is the proud presenter of DreamBIG Children’s Festival – the creation of Children’s Artspace is therefore a logical extension of these activities.

“He was also inspired by similar international organizations and their remarkable achievements and creative impact. We are therefore very happy to be part of a global network of like-minded galleries in Japan, the United States and Norway. It has so much potential for international exchange and cultural engagement.

“We are also delighted to partner on this project with the Adelaide Central School of Art and the new Children’s Artspace will interface with the new Festival Plaza and be a major public attraction. I would like to thank the private donors and corporate partners who have made this possible.

Children’s Artspace will be launched as part of a special Family Day celebration on the 19the February in conjunction with the reopening of the Festival Theater, including the Festival Plaza areas. Family Day will feature free events, activities and workshops, as well as Adelaide’s very first children’s markets, where movers and shakers can create and sell their own wares. Young exhibitors (and their loyal adult assistants) can register now here.

The Executive Director of the Children’s Museum of the Arts, New York City, USA, Seth Cameron, said he was excited by “The Children’s Museum of the Arts is delighted to welcome Children’s Artspace to the dialogue on children’s art , and we look forward to many successful collaborations between our organizations and among child artists around the world. “

Many local schools have already registered to be part of next year’s four exhibitions. Students will be mentored by specially selected local artists and graduates of the Adelaide Central School of Art, with which Children’s Artspace has a partnership.

Ruby Chew is one of the local artists who worked with Grades 3-7 students at Hackham West School and Keller Road Primary School to create new artwork for the opening exhibit, titled Kaleidoscope: Playing With Color.

The exhibition will include paintings and sculptures used to create a large mural and will encourage children to play with color and texture through expression, new skills and fun.

Adelaide Central School of Art Executive Director Penny Griggs said: “As a national leader in visual arts education, Adelaide Central School of Art is delighted to partner with Adelaide Festival Center to Connect Baccalaureate in Visual Arts graduates with schools in South Australia to undertake these special artists. residential homes.

“I am particularly looking forward to seeing the result of the residencies on display in the new Children’s Artspace and giving students the opportunity to share their work with the diverse audiences of the Adelaide Festival Center.”

Supported by the Adelaide Festival Center Foundation, Children’s Artspace will be hosted by Alice Dilger of Adelaide Festival Center who noted “with exhibits created by and for children in South Australia, Children’s Artspace will encourage creativity and expression while providing a safe place to discuss big topics children face in these difficult times.

Adelaide Festival Center Foundation is raising funds for the Children’s Artspace project which will ensure the next generation of South Australians the opportunity to participate, be inspired and fall in love with the arts.

Public donations can be made via this link: www.adelaidefestivalcentre.com.au/support-us/childrens-artspace/

More information on www.adelaidefestivalcentre.com.au/whats-on/childrens-artspace/

Image top and center: Hamada Children’s Museum of Art in Japan – Provided by Hamada Children’s Museum of Art; image above: Ruby Chew with Hackham West elementary school students C-Jay, Shi Shi and Paige

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September 29, 2021 – Adelaide Festival Center 20th anniversary inSPACE program unveiled

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March 25, 2021 – Adelaide Festival Center announces its fall 2021 season

February 10, 2021 – Adelaide Festival Center’s main performance space will close for up to seven months from mid-July

December 30, 2020 – Record-breaking vote sees new stars celebrated on Adelaide Festival Center’s Walk of Fame

November 19, 2020 – South Australia’s COVID-19 breaker sees Adelaide Festival Center cancel all performances

October 20, 2020 – The OzAsia Talks at Adelaide Festival Center focus on cultural engagement between Australia and Asia

October 14, 2020 – Adelaide Festival Center reports 77 shows canceled during coronavirus shutdown

August 12, 2020 – Adelaide Festival Center welcomes audiences to the new Her Majesty’s Theater

June 20, 2020 – Adelaide Festival Center trust announces new nominations

March 18, 2020 – The Adelaide Festival Center and the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Center announce the closure of their venues

November 23, 2021 – Australian premiere for TixTrack ticketing with NSW Art Gallery implementation

November 5, 2021 – The Art Gallery of Western Australia delivers Perth’s largest rooftop terrace

October 12, 2021 – Bendigo Art Gallery Selected to Participate in Victorian Government’s Vaccinated Economy Trial

October 4, 2021 – City of Newcastle agrees to support expansion of Newcastle Art Gallery with additional funding

July 23, 2021 – Fixed rate loan sets path for Newcastle Art Gallery expansion

January 7, 2021 – NGV to receive $ 20 million grant for new contemporary art gallery

January 29, 2020 – Dedication ceremony for the new art gallery at Arthur Boyd’s property in Riversdale

August 31, 2019 – Business case published for the National Aboriginal Art Gallery in Alice Springs

March 27, 2019 – Federal government pledges $ 10 million to new Rockhampton art gallery


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