exhibition design – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 23:44:49 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://expo-monet.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-63-120x120.png exhibition design – Expo Monet http://expo-monet.com/ 32 32 Assistant Professor, Scenic/Set/Production/Installation/Specialization Design job with OP JINDAL GLOBAL UNIVERSITY https://expo-monet.com/assistant-professor-scenic-set-production-installation-specialization-design-job-with-op-jindal-global-university/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 23:44:49 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/assistant-professor-scenic-set-production-installation-specialization-design-job-with-op-jindal-global-university/ The Jindal School of Art and Architecture (JSAA) at OP Jindal Global University invites applications for the position of assistant professor who are willing to take on teaching and research assignments and are willing to join no later than early August 2022. JSAA is looking for candidates who have completed their undergraduate coursework in a […]]]>

The Jindal School of Art and Architecture (JSAA) at OP Jindal Global University invites applications for the position of assistant professor who are willing to take on teaching and research assignments and are willing to join no later than early August 2022.

JSAA is looking for candidates who have completed their undergraduate coursework in a professionally accredited architectural program in India or their country of residence with a master’s degree or higher degrees focusing on set design, set design or film/stage production design.

Applicants should have expertise and research interests in dramaturgical spatial compositions in a theatrical or urban context, scenic design, installation and/or exhibition design, production and related courses related to narratives, textual-visual translations, in light, sound, costumes, movement, multimedia explorations, etc. Applicants are expected to teach and develop undergraduate studios and seminars, while demonstrating a keen interest in course development from a multi/interdisciplinary perspective and contributing to research.

Qualifications required

  1. Professionally accredited Bachelor of Architecture (or equivalent) and registration in India or their country of residence.
  2. Masters in Stage Design/Scenography/Scenic and/or Film Production Design/Exhibition Design, or Interior with a concentration in Stage Design/Scenography/Scenic or Film Production Design/Exhibition Design and Related Subjects
  3. Professional experience in exhibition/stage design/scenography/stage and/or film production (minimum 3 to 5 years)

Desired diplomas

  1. doctorate in the relevant field
  2. Prior education/industry experience is strongly preferred
  3. Flexible, integrative, collaborative and interdisciplinary approach to design education

How to register

Interested candidates can send their applications to HR@JGU.EDU.INas well as the following additional documents by the 9and April 2022.

  1. Cover letter
  2. Current Curriculum Vitae with the names of at least three professional/academic references and their contact details.
  3. A teaching statement (no more than 250 words)
  4. A research statement (no more than 250 words)
  5. Sample of a proposed studio course related to scenic/decorative/installation/exhibition design
  6. Sample of 2 offered seminar courses related to set/interior/installation design
  7. Scholarly Writing Sample
  8. Digital portfolio (maximum 50 pages, 30MB size limit) that includes professional and academic work (if applicable)

Please send all credentials above mentioning the following subject line:

“Application for Assistant Professor – SPECIALIZATION ARCHITECTURE W. SCENIC/SET/PRODUCTION/INSTALLATION/EXHIBITION DESIGN »

About the school

Jindal School of Art and Architecture is founded with the vision of becoming one of the leading schools for learning visual, material and built environments. The school is committed to developing an academic environment that is intellectually rigorous, interdisciplinary, innovative and creative. The school follows internationally accepted best practices of academia and is supported by a renowned faculty. We believe in research and innovation excellence that foster interdisciplinary research across all academic programs, empowering students and faculty to actively engage in solving the most pressing problems facing our world today.

About the University

OP Jindal Global University (JGU) is an Indian university offering world-class education, located in the National Capital Region, Delhi (Sonipat), India. JGU is a vibrant intellectual community of over 8,000 students, over 900 faculty, and over 500 staff representing 41 countries in twelve multidisciplinary schools: law, business, international affairs, public policy, liberal arts and journalism, art and architecture, banking and finance, environment and sustainability, psychology and counselling, languages ​​and literature and public health and human development. JGU is dedicated to promoting global learning through its global faculty, global programs, global collaborations, global research, and global programs. JGU is the youngest university to be ranked in the Top 3% Universities in the World and Top 150 Universities (Under 50) by Quacquarelli Symonds (QS) World Rankings 2021. JGU was ranked among the “Top 700 universities worldwide” in the QS World University Rankings 2021 and recognized as a “institution of eminenceby the Indian government.

Research:

JGU’s aspiration to become a world-class university is grounded in our commitment to promoting high-quality interdisciplinary research in a dynamic and plural environment, facilitated by a supportive governance and management structure, enabling policies and facilitating state-of-the-art infrastructure. . Pursuing a global research agenda is central to our goal of building a world-class institution of learning.

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Exhibition Design in 2022 – Design Week https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-2022-design-week/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 11:55:20 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-2022-design-week/ As part of our Design in 2022 series, Nissen Richards Director Pippa Nissen offers her perspective on what could happen in exhibit design over the next year. Through Henry Wong January 14, 2022 11:55 a.m. January 14, 2022 11:55 a.m. What do you think 2022 holds for exhibition design? Wonderful escape I suspect, as we […]]]>

As part of our Design in 2022 series, Nissen Richards Director Pippa Nissen offers her perspective on what could happen in exhibit design over the next year.

What do you think 2022 holds for exhibition design?

Wonderful escape I suspect, as we find ways to celebrate what it means to be alive and human. However, the cultural landscape has changed. We need to be more aware of who is represented and how our work impacts the planet. We cannot be lazy or careless. Exhibits should be smart, witty and make a statement. They must be worth leaving the house to connect us to the world and the spirit of the times.

We welcome the move to recyclable plinths – like Assemble used for the Charlotte Perriand exhibition at the Design Museum – with stacked cinder blocks to create artwork bases. These can be taken apart and used for another installation or to build something else, like a reconfigurable parts kit. Anything less seems inappropriate now.

The power to improve and transform digital and lighting will also be essential. Exhibits may be slightly jumbled around the edges, held up by pegs, or surrounded by keyed fittings, bolts, or industrial items. If the gesture is correct, it’s fine – as long as it looks good in a photo.

I also predict a return to clean, good quality designs. Perhaps as exhibition designers we should strive to be invisible, only creating an atmosphere, where nothing interferes with the moment of truth between the visitor and the object, painting or idea on display. .


Culture House

What was your favorite exhibition design project in 2021?

In Moscow for work recently, I had the incredible good fortune to see the newly opened House of Culture, designed and detailed by Renzo Piano. I loved the ambition of this building – to rethink what a museum or gallery should be and how exhibits could be better integrated into a series of flexible spaces, encouraging debate and creativity.

The museum is large and includes artist galleries, auditoriums and gardens overlooking the city and the river. I was really impressed with the human voice that comes through in the artwork in this machine-like environment. In a way, the fragility of the works came through more with the coherence of the approach to color, tones and construction materials of the gallery and the building.

The works then on display – by Ragnar Kjartansson – seemed really appropriate. An Icelandic performance artist, whose pieces range from extensive collections of paintings to video installations – expand and contract, reflecting the experimentation of the building itself.

Other highlights include the recently opened Munch Museum in Oslo, an exhibition of the work of photographer Thomas Demand at the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow, the exhibition on The French Dispatch by Wes Anderson at 180 Studios, as well as Tate Play at Tate Modern.

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Conclusion of the training on museum and heritage management https://expo-monet.com/conclusion-of-the-training-on-museum-and-heritage-management/ https://expo-monet.com/conclusion-of-the-training-on-museum-and-heritage-management/#respond Fri, 15 Oct 2021 11:29:11 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/conclusion-of-the-training-on-museum-and-heritage-management/ The training organized at the Banjul National Museum was sponsored by the Youth Empowerment Project (YEP) in partnership with the Austrian Embassy in Dakar which provided financial, technical and coordination support through the National Center for Arts and Culture (NCAC) and The Gambia Travel and Tourism Institute (ITTOG). Speaking on behalf of the Minister of […]]]>


The training organized at the Banjul National Museum was sponsored by the Youth Empowerment Project (YEP) in partnership with the Austrian Embassy in Dakar which provided financial, technical and coordination support through the National Center for Arts and Culture (NCAC) and The Gambia Travel and Tourism Institute (ITTOG).

Speaking on behalf of the Minister of Tourism and Culture, Hassoum Ceesay, Director General of the National Center for Arts and Culture congratulated the museum staff for their ability to carry out the training.

He gave an overview of the training; its benefit and importance to graduates while adding that the training of museum staff prior to this last took place in 2004, “over 17 years ago”.

DG Ceesay noted that museums play an essential role in tourism, cultural identity and heritage conservation, while noting that during the training, participants were trained in different areas, including museum conservation, exhibition design, guiding and oral history.

He reiterated that in recent times there has been a decline in museum education compared to recent years, “Therefore, what you have just concluded is a great opportunity for you.”

The Director General thanked all partners and the lead trainer for her willingness and dedication to travel to The Gambia to conduct the training.

Ngoneh Panneh, Program Manager, Tourism and Creative ITC, said ITC recognizes the value of museums as a great treasure of human civilization representing the essence of national history and culture that enables generations to continue to learn the history of the country, preserve the heritage and pay homage to those who sacrifice themselves to build a nation.

Beyond that, she said that museums are institutions of neutrality demonstrating the power of knowledge, and to bring together the collective memory of humanity because “they inspire people to be more creative and innovative, help to do advancing the whole of society through creativity, the promotion of peace, the creation of employment and an institution for the education of young people and children.

Looking at cross-sector synergies, Ms. Panneh highlighted the contributions of museums in the tourism sector in terms of attracting visitors to communities, sharing the country’s history, values ​​and culture, while continuing to support heritage to support employment and income generation.

So, “now you need to be more strategic, embrace the concept of sustainability, be innovative and build the capacity to incorporate interesting and yet relevant artefacts into your collection,” she told the graduates.

Ms. Panneh also took the opportunity to thank the partners – NCAC, ITTOG and the Austrian Embassy in Dakar, European Union for allowing ITC through YEP to provide funding for the program.

Mr. Cheikh Tejan Nyang, director of the ITTOG school thanked the trainees for being the first to participate in the program.

He noted that over the years several programs have been put in place to ensure the preservation of heritage; noting that “as a result of this the training program has been developed to ensure that you, the custodians of these heritage sites, are fully trained to be able to interpret the history and essence of existence heritage ”.

Mr. Nyang also thanked the partners for their confidence in coordinating the course.

Fatima Fall Nyang, principal trainer of the Research and Documentation Center, Senegal, thanked the partners for the opportunity given to her to train the participants.

She reminded them to use everything they learned about preservation, exhibition and documentation, among others.


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Mather & Cie | exhibition design partner for Inverness Castle https://expo-monet.com/mather-cie-exhibition-design-partner-for-inverness-castle/ https://expo-monet.com/mather-cie-exhibition-design-partner-for-inverness-castle/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/mather-cie-exhibition-design-partner-for-inverness-castle/ Mather & Cie, one of the leading consultants in tourist attractions and exhibition design, was announced by the Highland Council as the successful exhibition designer for the project to transform Inverness Castle into a world-class tourist attraction. Since its establishment in 1995, the company has worked on the design of many popular and successful exhibitions, […]]]>


Mather & Cie, one of the leading consultants in tourist attractions and exhibition design, was announced by the Highland Council as the successful exhibition designer for the project to transform Inverness Castle into a world-class tourist attraction.

Since its establishment in 1995, the company has worked on the design of many popular and successful exhibitions, tourist attractions, tours and museums around the world. With 25 years of experience in the industry, Mather & Co is able to come up with new and innovative ways to tell stories, engage visitors and attract new audiences.

Previous projects include Downton Abbey: the exhibition; The ultimate ride to the Silverstone experience; The experience of the Royal Mint; and the R&A World of Golf Museum in St Andrews.

Chris Mather, CEO, Mather & Co; Fiona Hampton, Director, Inverness Castle; Sarah Clarke, Managing Director, Mather & Co. inside the entrance to Inverness Castle. Image credit: Ewen Weatherspoon

Transform Inverness Castle

Mather & Co will bring this rich experience to the transformation of Inverness Castle and to the development of the “Spirit of the Highlands” project. Their approach will take into account the entire visitor experience, including what people see and interact with before, during and after their visit. The project will ensure that everyone who visits the castle has a memorable time and will want to visit it again in the future.

Celebrating and interpreting “the spirit of the highlands” in 100 stories will be the central theme of the visitor experience. The tender invited the successful company to develop and explore this theme in imaginative and unexpected ways, encouraging people to visit other places around the Highlands.

“The appointment of Mather & Co as exhibition designers for the project is an important step in the transformation of Inverness Castle”, states Fergus ewing MSP, co-chair of the Inverness Castle Delivery Group.

“Their vast experience across a diverse range of tourist attractions across the world will be a welcome contribution to the development of the castle as a gateway to Highland tourism, as well as a place that locals and visitors alike will have. looking forward to visiting again and again. “

Chris mather, CEO of Mather & Co, adds: “We are delighted to be part of the project team and start by creating a first class and compelling attraction – showcasing the rich heritage of the Highlands and Islands and the castle itself. -same “

Inverness Castle Project
Image credit LDN Architects srl

A world-class tourist attraction for the Highlands

High Life Highland is the managing agent of the Highland Council in the project to transform Inverness Castle into a tourist attraction for the Highlands. The transformation of Inverness Castle is supported by an investment of £ 15million from the Scottish government and £ 3million from the UK government as part of the Inverness and Highlands area agreement.

The project aims to create a gateway for Highland tourism, helping to revitalize tourism across the region and provide investment to the industry as it recovers from the pandemic. It will support economic growth throughout the Highland region, creating a long-lasting must-see attraction celebrating the spirit of the Highlands.

The Inverness and Highland City Region Agreement is a joint initiative supported by an investment of up to £ 315million from the UK and Scottish governments, the Highland Council, Highlands and Islands Enterprise and the University of the Highlands and Islands, aimed at to stimulate sustainable regional economic growth.

Mather & Co is a experienced multidisciplinary design consultancy based in Chesire, UK. It offers a flexible and adaptable service, adapted to the needs of each client.

Top image credits LDN Architects srl


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Design in 2021 – what will exhibition design look like? https://expo-monet.com/design-in-2021-what-will-exhibition-design-look-like/ https://expo-monet.com/design-in-2021-what-will-exhibition-design-look-like/#respond Tue, 05 Jan 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/design-in-2021-what-will-exhibition-design-look-like/ Through Molly long January 5, 2021 12h53 January 15, 2021 9:02 What do you think 2021 will hold for exhibition design? What a roller coaster year 2020 for exhibition design! With many museums closed for much of the year and needing to put staff on leave, many short and long term projects have postponed openings. […]]]>


What do you think 2021 will hold for exhibition design?

What a roller coaster year 2020 for exhibition design! With many museums closed for much of the year and needing to put staff on leave, many short and long term projects have postponed openings. As a result, many institutions and design agencies have taken the time to completely rethink the future – and on many levels. The pandemic has impacted in so many different ways, from budgets and deadlines to new sensitivities and perspectives and the more practical issues of visitor travel, including the implications of touch and the importance of travel lanes.

As we move forward now, I think the appetite for exhibitions will follow different paths. On the one hand, we’ll see some really exciting installations that come and go in a flash. Inexpensive exhibitions to set up and embodying creative and free-thinking solutions, making maximum use of light and the audiovisual sector.

On the other hand, we will see beautifully designed, clean, and material-rich displays that are highly regarded. I think the exhibits will become immensely popular as we come out of the pandemic. I predict an explosion of creativity too. People are so hungry for exciting ‘real’ things that embody value and craftsmanship, as well as new and empowering designs, especially after the lack of experiential 3D cultivation in our home-confined, life-based existence. the screen of recent times. I also believe that there will be a significantly increased engagement in exhibition design for sustainable materials and more flexible, modular and reusable designs.

I can’t wait to see what will happen in 2021.

What is your favorite example of exhibition design from 2020 and why?

The year was thus divided between the pre-containment exposures in January and February and what followed.

Earlier this year, I just managed to see a big exhibition called Sense Me at the Trapholt Museum of Modern Art in Kolding, Denmark. It was a wonderful sensory journey, with textured curtains in which you could walk around and experience effects; a responsive digital box that you can walk in and create moving images and a room full of curved wooden trees that emit sounds with a disorienting and distorting mirror, as well as a cloud that you can gaze into at the top of a ladder (photo above). It was a brilliant and immersive experience that seemed all the more impressive as nothing like it was possible for the rest of the year and beyond.

We are currently designing an exhibition on touch at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, which opens this month and whose subject matter will have an entirely different resonance after Covid, which was completely unforeseen during the conception of the exhibition.


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The five biggest exhibition design stories of 2020 https://expo-monet.com/the-five-biggest-exhibition-design-stories-of-2020/ https://expo-monet.com/the-five-biggest-exhibition-design-stories-of-2020/#respond Fri, 18 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/the-five-biggest-exhibition-design-stories-of-2020/ In a year when many cultural institutions were closed, exhibition designers had to adapt and often bring the museum experience into our own homes. Through Henri wong December 18, 2020 11:27 a.m. December 18, 2020 12:58 Non-Pavilion, a VR installation at the V&A for last year’s London Design Festival How would the hard-hit exhibition industry […]]]>


In a year when many cultural institutions were closed, exhibition designers had to adapt and often bring the museum experience into our own homes.

Non-Pavilion, a VR installation at the V&A for last year’s London Design Festival

How would the hard-hit exhibition industry return after the first lockdown? The Design Museum‘s flagship exhibit, Electronic: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers, was set up before the lockdown and its organizers revealed to Design Week how it was adjusted accordingly. In addition to the obligatory masks and hand sanitizer stations, the capacity of the bikes had been doubled so that people did not have to take public transport and the capacity was cut in half (the museum had to open late to fill a lack of ticket sales).

Beyond the immediate changes, we wondered how exhibition design could evolve in the long term. Nissen Richards studio director Pippa Nissen told Design Week Covid could start a ‘digital revolution’ in exhibition spaces with the rise of augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR). She also noted that there might be a shift towards an (even more) more organized experience, driven by how people might experience confined spaces differently. Future exhibits could be about “experiencing someone’s pre-designed experience” with less choice on the part of the visitor.

Materials would be another focus. “We can’t waste so much anymore,” Nissen said. Not only should the materials be more durable, but they should be more adaptable (to change social distancing rules and future plans). It was a trend echoed at Milan’s Salone Del Mobile – which we attended the preview just before the lockdown and its possible postponement – where the focus was on reusable exhibition displays.


The Chemical Brothers experiment, designed by Smith & Lyall

When it finally opened, Design Week saw a relatively quiet preview of the Design Museum’s successful exhibition on the history of electronic music. A transfer from Paris, Electronic: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers took turn-of-the-century visitors and ‘mad sound scientists’ to the Chicago house scene and also to Manchester where the graphic work of Ben Kelly and Peter Saville for the Haçienda club is displayed.

Perhaps most striking in the exhibit was the three lights and sounds installation which would have been particularly well received by all visitors missing the city’s closed club scene. Kraftwerk’s 3D experience was akin to a high-level music video, displaying music from the band’s eight albums. Architecture 1024’s large-scale moving light display was set to the soundtrack of French DJ Laurent Garnier.

The final room belonged to Got to Keep On, a 2019 play by the Chemical Brothers and showmakers Smith & Lyall. The room featured strobe light and smoke effects and shape-shifting 3D visuals. It summed up what Smith & Lyall called the “transformative power of music, art and design”.


Courtesy of the Trustees of the British Museum

As in many sectors, museums and galleries have focused this year on digital. When people couldn’t go out, the best way to reach them was at home. In the spring, the British Museum launched what it called one of the “most comprehensive online museum collections databases” in the world. Some 4 million objects have been made available for viewing online. The curation, however, has not been abolished. Themes were launched in conjunction with the exhibits, such as Love and Identity, which sought to provide an organized experience for people, told us Michael Tame, head of the museum’s digital program.

Across the industry, efforts have been made to improve online accessibility during the lockdown. For example, the Royal Academy has created a 38-minute online tour of its Picasso and Paper exhibition. It wasn’t unprecedented – Google once helped institutions like the National Gallery in London and the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York to create virtual tours – but there was now a bigger push.

AR Acute Art Platform – interviewed by Design Week at the start of the year – has also expanded its offer with a new application that puts the user in the position of exhibition curator. Designed in-house, the app uses phone cameras to place facilities in people’s homes. He was accompanied by a few renowned collaborators: Jeff Koons, Marina Abramovic and Ai Weiwei.


Paramount by Konstantin Grcic for Toy Poodle. Photo: Hiroshi Yoda.

Man’s best friend was the focus of a design-led exhibition at Japan House in London this summer. “The human engineering approach is a vision of creating the environment that uses the human body as a criterion,” explained Hara Kenya, chief creative advisor at Japan House. “However, look at a small dog next to its owner and you begin to see the potential for a new type of architecture.”

16 architects and designers from around the world produced work for the playful exhibition, attracting Japanese architect Kengo Kuma. Among the collection of beds, toys and activities was a poodle-specific piece by German industrial designer Konstantin Grcic. Paramount was a mirrored structure that aimed to appeal to the breed known to love its own reflection.

Japanese architect Kazuyo Sejima was inspired by the characteristics of his subject himself. Mimicking the fluffy coat of the Bichon Frize, he created a “cotton candy cocoon” where the breed could relax in comfort and style.


The V&A Alice in Wonderland exhibit was scheduled to open this summer. When the exhibit was postponed until next year, the museum turned to London-based game studio Preloaded to create VR sets for those who wish to visit the fantastic world of Lewis Carroll.

While the original plan was to have a 4-minute experience at the exhibit itself, that ambition grew during lockdown to become a home-based virtual reality experience. The studio also developed a centerpiece for the exhibition preview in October. The experience took people to the Queen of Hearts Garden and the Hall of Doors, incorporating visual tricks – such as the change of scale – throughout. The world consisted of vivid hand-drawn visuals, with illustrations by Icelandic artist Kristjana S. Williams.

Virtual reality opens up possibilities for the exhibition experience, Preloaded associate creative director Jon Caplin told us. “Not being held back by the physical world means you can completely change the environment, in color and scale,” he added, while noting that it could be experienced in the comfort of people’s bedrooms. . In an age of social distancing, this could be a useful avenue for museums and galleries to explore – although that of course means investing in a VR headset, added Caplin.


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Exhibition design in the post-covid era https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-the-post-covid-era/ https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-the-post-covid-era/#respond Tue, 01 Dec 2020 08:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/exhibition-design-in-the-post-covid-era/ Being in a closed art gallery could make anyone paranoid during a pandemic. Visitors who brave the risk of leaving their homes may still doubt whether they are in a crowded space, people standing too close to them, or be skeptical of air circulation in museums. The spectrum of control exercised by people who frequent […]]]>


Being in a closed art gallery could make anyone paranoid during a pandemic. Visitors who brave the risk of leaving their homes may still doubt whether they are in a crowded space, people standing too close to them, or be skeptical of air circulation in museums. The spectrum of control exercised by people who frequent an indoor art museum varies greatly from the experience of visiting an outdoor botanical garden. How to give visitors more space to enjoy the works in complete safety? The field of exhibit design is expanding to meet these evolving challenges that will likely persist well beyond a vaccine solution against COVID-19.

Exhibits take years to prepare. While some exhibitions dealing with permanent collectibles have more flexibility, other exhibitions with works on loan from private collectors or other artistic institutions are more complicated. They require extensive agreements, insurance, and usually a courier to get them back and forth between spaces. When COVID restrictions started hitting museums last spring, it turned the exhibition programs of most museums upside down. Not only have they had to rethink, postpone or cancel entire exhibitions, but they have also had to rethink their current galleries to allow for greater social distancing.

When many museums only allow 25% capacity, how visitors interact with the space becomes increasingly important. Avoiding bottlenecks and consolidations is a major concern. What does this mean for interpretation and museum experience? Visitors are likely to see fewer labels. The text on the wall can bring groups of people together to read it. It will take more work from guests to educate themselves with brochures or visit the website for more background on the artwork before their visit. Videos and other materials that enhance the visitor experience will become simpler, shorter, or only available online.

Exhibition design will likely continue to evolve into a “less is more” approach. More artwork will be removed from checklists to leave extra space between objects and viewers. The galleries will therefore appear larger and more open. Based on neuroscience research from Peabody Essex Museum of Art, we know that visitors tend to spend much more time viewing individual works of art earlier in the exhibits than at the end. Less work and more space will allow visitors to better pace themselves and enjoy the rooms without being overwhelmed or crowded.

A debated point in the design of an exhibition is whether there should be one way to experience an art exhibition if there is to be multiple routes. Most museums’ post-pandemic protocols have a “one-way, one-way” system to guide human trafficking. Some believe that this is a less efficient way to deal with crowds and that the more people in and out of a space, the better it is for visitors. However, studies from the Peabody Essex Museum have also found that when museum visitors see an exit sign, they tend to spend less time interested in art and have a sense of urgency to leave.

COVID-19 will undoubtedly affect the way museums are built and renovated for decades to come. It will be highly preferable to have flexible gallery spaces where walls can be removed or auditoriums with seating that can be reconfigured. Bringing the outdoors into artistic institutions, a push that began long before the pandemic, will become a priority. Outdoor cafes and illuminated glass corridors will gradually become the new standard for museums around the world. Gift shops might even become mini-museums themselves, where touching is a thing of the past, and where you navigate to shop.

Condensing an exhibition’s message with fewer works of art, text, and interpretive elements can allow visitors a safe museum experience, but it offers a more diluted way of interacting with the art. Less accessible information and little or no tactile elements also make visits less rich and less memorable. While it is important to consider how to create the adaptable viewing experience possible, it is equally important to ensure that we don’t lose valuable content and to continue to find new ways of connecting people and the world. ‘art.


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Game On’s neon-filled exhibit design pays homage to ’80s video games https://expo-monet.com/game-ons-neon-filled-exhibit-design-pays-homage-to-80s-video-games/ https://expo-monet.com/game-ons-neon-filled-exhibit-design-pays-homage-to-80s-video-games/#respond Fri, 23 Oct 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/game-ons-neon-filled-exhibit-design-pays-homage-to-80s-video-games/ Spanish firm Smart & Green Design has reimagined the traveling Barbican Game On exhibition for an old underground cistern in Madrid, using more than 150 LED arches to evoke the neon colors of the 1980s. The retrospective, said to be the largest international exhibition to explore the history of video games, covers more than 400 […]]]>


Spanish firm Smart & Green Design has reimagined the traveling Barbican Game On exhibition for an old underground cistern in Madrid, using more than 150 LED arches to evoke the neon colors of the 1980s.


The retrospective, said to be the largest international exhibition to explore the history of video games, covers more than 400 collectible objects and designs spanning the birth of technology from the 1960s to the present day.

Visitors to the exhibition can play 150 video games

Along with that, 150 original video games can be played as part of the show, including early games like Space Invaders and Tetris, classics like Rock Band, Pokemon and The Sims as well as newer games like Fifa and Wii Sports.

After visiting more than 30 countries, including China, the United States and Australia, the exhibition came to Madrid between November 2019 and May 2020 thanks to the Arts and Culture Foundation. Foundation channel.

Illuminated signs in the scenography of the Smart & Green Design video game exhibition
LEDs are arranged in colored arcs

Game On’s revamped setup, which earned Smart & Green Design the public vote at this year’s Dezeen Awards in the exhibition design category, relied heavily on multicolored LED tubes hung throughout the space. ‘exposure.

Placed in an otherwise dimly lit interior, these recalled the vector graphics of early video games such as Battle Zone, in which simple lines and curves on a black background were used to create the illusion of three-dimensional spaces.

LEDs were arranged in color-coded arches and tunnels to create the impression of architectural elements, demarcating 15 distinct sections and guiding visitors through the exhibition.

“The design follows simple geometries and repetitions as some of the most famous video games have done.” Smart and green designThe founder of Fernando Muñoz told Dezeen.

“These lines created perspectives and the illusion of 3D space, although all of the elements are two-dimensional.”

Each section was also marked with a neon sign proclaiming its theme, which hung in mid-air in a snap from the floating score numbers often found in the top corner of a game’s screen.

Neon signs in the Game On exhibit design by Smart & Green Design
Neon signs read the names of the different sections

The main challenge for the studio was to balance the buzz and excitement of an arcade with the kind of calm, contemplative spaces needed to accommodate the archival objects, sketches, and stories behind them. .

To this end, Muñoz has developed two distinct spatial typologies.

While the stations for playing the games were placed inside the existing 7.5-meter-high brick arches of the cistern, each lit by an LED frame, the remaining exhibits were housed in “light tunnels”, perpendicular to the arches.

LED arches in video game exhibition design from Smart & Green Design
Stations for playing video games are integrated into the existing brick arches of the cistern

“We designed several tunnels using rectangular wooden frames with built-in lights,” Muñoz said.

“The rhythm of these structures created the feeling of being inside a separate space and they also contain walls or showcases to show the contents.”

The layout of the Game On exhibition design by Smart & Green Design
Light tunnels extend perpendicular to existing brick arches (marked in black above)

To achieve these walls, the studio opted for soundproofing panels, which have the double advantage of muffling noise from the outdoor play space and of being easier to reuse for future exhibitions.

“We try not to use heavy resources like MDF or drywall, which cannot be reused without generating waste and requires a lot of energy for both assembly and disassembly,” Muñoz said.

“We try to create lightweight systems that are easily assembled and stored and with standardized dimensions so that they can be reused and adapted to any space or design.”

LED Frames in Video Game Exhibition Design from Smart & Green Design
The walls are integrated into the light tunnels to house the information

In order to compensate for the high gray energy of the LEDs, Muñoz designed the lighting system in a modular way, with tubes of half a meter, one meter or two meters long, so that they can be stored effectively and reused over and over again in different constellations.

It’s part of the studio’s larger strategy to try to reduce the amount of waste produced by temporary facilities.

Light tunnels in the Game On exhibition design by Smart & Green Design
The walls are made of sound absorbing panels

“The exhibition industry is responsible for a huge amount of waste due to the ephemeral state of its products,” Muñoz explained.

“We believe that through design and long-term collaborative strategies with exhibition organizers, waste can be reduced. We have designed our own carbon calculator and custom protocols to interact with administration and coordinators from the world of exhibitions. “

LED Frames in Video Game Exhibition Design from Smart & Green Design
The exhibition was visible until May 2020

Besides Game On, other exhibition projects short-listed for the Dezeen Awards 2020 include a memorial filled with artifacts that belonged to victims of gun violence and an installation at Fondazione Prada with 1,400 porcelain plates hanging from the walls of a golden coin.

Although the recipients of the public vote have already been determined, the winners of the official Dezeen Awards, judged by a panel of experts including Norman Foster, Michelle Ogundehin and Konstantin Grcic, will not be announced until the end of November.

The Game On exhibition took place from November 29, 2019 to May 31, 2020 at Castellana 214 in Madrid. Check out the Dezeen Events Guide for an up-to-date list of architecture and design events happening around the world.


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Twelve warning urban tales. Exhibition design / Taller de Casqueria https://expo-monet.com/twelve-warning-urban-tales-exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria/ https://expo-monet.com/twelve-warning-urban-tales-exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria/#respond Fri, 11 Sep 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/twelve-warning-urban-tales-exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria/ Twelve warning urban tales. Exhibition design / Taller de Casqueria © Galerna exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria/5f5843feb35765e32a000540-twelve-cautionary-urban-tales-exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria-photo” title=”© Galerna” width=”125″/>+ 22 To share To share Facebook Twitter Pinterest WhatsApp Mail Or https://www.archdaily.com/947387/twelve-cautionary-urban-tales-exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned: 650 m² Year Year of completion of this architecture project Year: 2020 Photographs Photographs: Galerna Manufacturers Brands with products used […]]]>


Twelve warning urban tales. Exhibition design / Taller de Casqueria

© Galernaexhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria/5f5843feb35765e32a000540-twelve-cautionary-urban-tales-exhibition-design-taller-de-casqueria-photo” title=”© Galerna” width=”125″/>© Galerna© Galerna© Galerna+ 22


  • Zoned Area of ​​this architectural project Zoned:
    650 m²

  • Year Year of completion of this architecture project

    Year:

    2020


  • Photographs Photographs: Galerna

  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project

    Manufacturers: RJ brackets, Textilfy


  • Principal architect:

    Elena Fuertes, Ramón Martínez, lvaro Molins, Jorge Sobejano

© Galerna
© Galerna

Text description provided by the architects. The exhibition Twelve Warning Urban Tales, based on Superstudio’s Twelve Warning Tales for Christmas, aims to “rethink our role in the construction of the city”, in the words of Ethel Baraona, curator of the exhibition. . Through twelve installations that focus on different aspects of society and its relationship with the urban environment, Twelve Warning Urban Tales explores utopias and dystopias about the future of the city.

© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna

The exhibition route takes up the first idea of ​​the city as a limit: the physical and legal framework in which citizenship is born. The proposal defines a space within the Matadero Madrid exhibition space in which the interventions are located. Consequently, an intermediate space appears which is not an exterior properly speaking, but not an interior: a prolonged threshold that surrounds the exhibition. A semi-dark transition space, which allows the visitor to understand the exhibition from the outside and to look for alternative ways to approach it. A staircase placed in this threshold allows visitors to rise above the wall and have a distant view of the entire exhibition.

© Galerna
© Galerna
Development plan
Development plan
© Galerna
© Galerna

Inside the perimeter, the exhibition space is structured by a regular grid distorted by the proposed boundary. This structure in the form of a game board assigns a cell to each intervention and guides the movement of visitors through the exhibition, opening up different paths. The grid also serves as a support structure for each of the installations as well as for the graphic material, which takes the form of larger banners, flags and textiles. The materiality of the perimeter mixes and blurs the reflections of the interventions in a continuous background.

© Galerna
© Galerna
Elevation
Elevation
© Galerna
© Galerna

Twelve uplifting urban narratives construct an image of the city based on different projections of the future to come, prompting visitors to create their own narrative.

© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna
© Galerna



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“It could spark a revolution”: the design of the post-COVID exhibition https://expo-monet.com/it-could-spark-a-revolution-the-design-of-the-post-covid-exhibition/ https://expo-monet.com/it-could-spark-a-revolution-the-design-of-the-post-covid-exhibition/#respond Tue, 14 Jul 2020 07:00:00 +0000 https://expo-monet.com/it-could-spark-a-revolution-the-design-of-the-post-covid-exhibition/ As museums and galleries begin to open, we take a look at how the exhibition design has been adapted to immediate needs and how it could change forever. Through Henri wong July 14, 2020 3:52 p.m. July 16, 2020 10:39 a.m. The Design Museum was scheduled to host Kraftwerk and The Chemical Brothers on April […]]]>


As museums and galleries begin to open, we take a look at how the exhibition design has been adapted to immediate needs and how it could change forever.

The Design Museum was scheduled to host Kraftwerk and The Chemical Brothers on April 1. The coronavirus outbreak put an end to that but not before the creation of Electronic: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers. The last temporary exhibition at the Musée de Londres is a transfer from the Musée de la Musique-Philarmonie de Paris, initially organized by Jean-Yves LeLoup. According to the Design Museum, it will transport visitors through “the people, art, design, technology and photography that have shaped the electronic music landscape” by evoking the experience of being in a club.

Nightclubs and exhibitions trying to evoke nightclubs are not a viable concept in an age of social distancing. But when the museum partially reopens on July 31 with the exhibit, it is hoped that new measures will keep visitors and staff safe (and provide peace of mind). This will in part be achieved through a new “Safe and Sound” policy which details how the museum complies with government guidelines. All visitors will wear masks, the capacity of bicycle parking has been doubled to make it easier for people to cycle to the site and there will be hand disinfection stations.

Core, by 1024 Architecture at the Parisian edition of Electronic

The museum also aims to halve the number of visitors to the exhibit at any given time. This goal, while safer for visitors and staff, clearly poses problems for ticket sales. To cover the potential shortfall, the venue opens later in the evening, until 9 p.m. each day. To keep pace, all tours can now only last an hour and a half. The Design Museum’s director of hearings, Joséphine Chanter, says the delay is “largely self-regulated.”

The scenography of the exhibition was modified during the confinement to reflect these new needs. All interactive screens, those using iPads for example, have been removed. Any touchscreen that would be used by hundreds of people a day is no longer a possibility. Visitors will also need to bring their own headphones for the sound elements of the exhibition. (This development is reminiscent of trends in aircraft inflight entertainment systems, where the use of personal devices is likely to increase.) There is also now a one-way system throughout the exhibit; there will be no spaces where people can pass each other. This will be aided by ground graphics that encourage social distancing, designed by London-based Studio LP.


A “quieter pace”

Virtual studio of composer Jean-Michel Jarre

The museum’s chief curator, Justin McGuirk, told Design Week that the lockdown gave the team an opportunity to “think” about how the guidelines would affect the show. “Spatially, a key factor has been creating more space around objects,” he says. This means that some experiences and some items have been removed. An “interactive battery experience” has been removed, for example.

McGuirk hopes the changes won’t take anything away from the experience, but may make it “smoother.” “I actually think one of the possible opportunities is that it creates a slightly quieter experience for the visitor,” he says. They could, he said, reduce clutter and “pinch points” where visitors crowd around the work. “It might sound more intimate and exclusive.”

MR 808, the interactive drum, which will no longer be present

When the museum reopens, Electronic will be the only major London exhibit to open for the first time, according to McGuirk. There will likely be a period of trial and error as institutions determine what works and what does not. “I don’t suppose we have to rethink exhibits forever,” McGuirk believes, but that this is an interesting “test bed” for new ideas. “Museums will watch each other closely to see what works and what doesn’t,” he says.

Only Electronic will be open when the Design Museum reopens. In October there will be a Margaret Calvert retrospective on the first floor around the balcony galleries. A one-way route will probably be set up for the Calvert exhibition. Beazley Designs on the Year opens later in the year, a showcase for innovative design concepts. The exhibit was designed in containment and uses scaffolding to showcase the projects. Each object is given a 1.5m grid, which means visitors will be aware of the distance throughout. “Social distancing is built into the design,” adds McGuirk.


Find a “linear route”

National Trust Sutton Hoo exhibit, designed by Nissen Richards Studio

Nissen Richards studio manager Pippa Nissen told Design Week she had worked on “design in” solutions for temporary exhibitions to show clear routes as well as reconfigure permanent spaces with clear routes. signposted. Nissen has been working on a referral solution for The Wallace Collection, when the London art venue opens on July 15. She describes “adapting a museum to be able to open” a “ridiculously fun” process.

Finding a ‘linear route’ in a space is handy for smoother and socially distanced journeys, but it’s also about ‘making people feel good’. “As you step into each space, you can assess your own experience,” she says, which means “clear visibility” is crucial. While this type of “spatial configuration” needs to be put in place immediately, Nissen believes that some of it may “spill over” into longer-term exhibition design.

Orientation may not be the only design element affected. COVID could “launch a digital revolution” at exhibitions. The move away from iPads and “low-tech interactives” will see the role of “gesture-controlled interactives” increase, according to Nissen. This would likely include augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR), and the ability of technology to alter the spaces around visitors. While the lockdown has made it clear how technology makes cultural institutions available in our own rooms, the ability to transform grandiose venues has been a theme in exhibition design for some time, as we have seen. at the London Design Festival last year.

non-flag-resized
Non-Pavilion, a VR installation by Studio Micat, There Project and Proud Studio at the V&A for last year’s London Design Festival

“Information layers”

It’s not just about what happens in a place, but how the whole experience can change. Nissen suggests that the change could push towards “information layers” where the onus is on the visitor to take control. “Maybe you collect things that you dig into later,” she says. Objects can still be displayed “clearly and beautifully”, but there may be less information presented in the exhibition itself. This would of course call for social distancing and shorter visit times, if the current lockdown measures continue.

There will likely be a shift towards even more organized experiences. By creating linear routes through familiar spaces, people can encounter spaces differently. But for temporary exhibitions, there will be fewer built-in choices. This is echoed by the electronics of the Design Museum – the times when visitors had a choice throughout the exhibition have been removed. “It’s going to be a lot more about having someone’s pre-designed experience than spaces that are too full of choice,” suggests Nissen.


A shift towards sustainability

History of the Norwegian Book, at the National Library in Oslo

Like all areas of design grappling with a virus that lives on surfaces, materials will be a high priority going forward. The Nissen team re-examines longer term projects and ensures that any material used is “very durable” as it will need to be cleaned often and thoroughly and not be affected. There is an opportunity to be ‘playful’ with this aspect of design if used with care, like wood and metals. They can be used visually, for example, and placed out of reach.

All the time spent at home, in virtual meetings, and staring at computer screens, will result in a thirst for materials that show signs of life, Nissen suspects. Whether it’s a metal with an interesting patina or recycled plastics – where you can see it’s recycled. Nissen Richards likes Richlite, a kind of “compacted paper” that can be cleaned and printed to give it visual texture. “Anything other than Forex,” she adds.

There could be a broader shift towards sustainability in exhibition design, says Nissen. The studio is working on two or three projects with some clients and discussing how these incorporate more sustainable features. Designs that can be built and then adapted for different exhibitions, rather than just changing them up every time. The idea of ​​reusing sets in this way was a frequent topic at this year’s canceled Salone del Mobile premiere, where designers discussed possible ways to make festivals more sustainable.

“We can’t waste so much anymore,” says Nissen. One such idea could be to use the center of a room as an “anchor point” to which a modular design part could be attached, with the ability to be positioned in different ways. By moving the model 90 degrees, you can transform the space, from individual rooms to longer hallways, for example. Color, graphics and layers will also play an important role in adapting spaces, adds Nissen.

Thinking both short and long term will be a requirement for designers in the months and years to come. As Nissen notes, “there’s a rule one week and another the next.” The guiding grids that Nissen is working on right now might look “old school” next month. The only thing that seems certain is a need for adaptation.


Electronics: From Kraftwerk to The Chemical Brothers opens on July 13, 2020 at the Design Museum, 224 – 238 Kensington High Street London W8 6AG. Tickets start at £ 16. Please visit website for details.


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